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December 31, 1944 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-31

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:0

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, IDEC. 31, 1944

0 SUNDAY, DEC. 31, 1944

mwmw -.

.ussian

Forces

Smash

Into

Eastern

Budapest

-.

Meet Troops
Invading City,
From West
Liq idate Nazis
In Push To Vienna
By The Assodiated Press
LONDON, Dec. 30--Russian troops
smashed into the eastern part of
Budapest today for the first timef
and Soviet dispatches said they had
linked up on Danube islands in the
heart of the city with other units
invading the doomed Hungarian
capital from the west.
Release Soviet Forces
Simultaneously Soviet forces north
of the city completed the liquida-
tion of German-Hungarian units.
trapped in the Danube loop, Moscow
announced, releasing powerful for-
mations for the swelling offensive
which has swept to within 92 miles
of Vienna, Austrian capital.
The ferocity of the German stand
in Budapest's gutted streets and
squares was indicated byaspecial
Soviet announcement that Nazi
troops had "murdered Russian
troops who were carrying a white
flag during an atteipt to negotiate
a temporary truce in the city.".
Germans held As Long As Possible
Fighting over streets choked with
German dead and smashed tanks
anrd guns the Russians were bayon-
etting their way through walls of
German orrjered to hold out as long
as Possible in an effort to delay pow-
erful Russian thrusts through west-
ern Hungary and southern Slovakia
toward Bratislava and Vienna.
In the southern quarter of the
city the Russians overran Budapest's
vital dock sectors on and near Csepel
Island and the Germans now did not
even have a single airfield with which
to .supply their dying forces, Soviet
front dispatches said.
On the west side of Budapest, east
of the Danube, the Russians were
fighting through the fiat, most popu-
lous section of one of Europe's most
beautiful capitals, b;ut in the Buda-
section on the west side of the river
the going appeared to be more diffi-
cilt.

0 54
, oA n oGNARavenna Sea
Pi -C-n m TAL
Massa P 'Pistoia Pe aro
uc -~~P ' 8b Army .' FanD
ReggENC AModena
Sea LavORNo . es
ENO'. ..4 GNR
C'.'Tern,
GERMANS COUNTERATTACK IN ITALY-Arrows indicate action
on the Italian front (heavy lne). Germans continued counterattacks
along the Serchin River ner the west coast. enveloping the town of
Barga and forcing a Fifth ArIMy withdrawal. Eighth Army troops near
the east coast continued their drive toward Bologna. ,

Manchurian 'PATRIOTIC GESTURE':
Troops Used by Former Greek Minister Lands

Japs Continue
To Evacuate
North Burma,
CALCUTTA, Dec. 30.-UP)- The

Japs at Leyte
GEN. MAC ARTHUR'S HEAD-
QUARTERS, Philippines, Dec. 31,
Sunday-(P)-Gen. Douglas MacAr-
thur disclosed today, while a new,
Mindoro-bound convoy pressed on,
under Japanese attack to reinforce
his conquering forces, that the en-
emy had drawn troops from Man-
churia in an effort to stop him on
Leyte Island.
The American commander's com-
munique said Gen. Tomoyuki Yama-
shita had lost in the futile defense of
Leyte four army divisions and the
elements of two more, besides a naval
brigade and other special forces. 1
Total Japanese losses, including1
601 more killed in recent mopping
up operations, reached 116,770, the.
communique said.
MacArthur declared the campaign
ended Christmas Day when his
troops captured Palompon, the last
enemy port of escape.

1ew legency ot altos

i
1
1

FOREIGN STUDENTS CELBAE
New Year GtsVaried Reception
4/ - ---- a-

By The Associated Presst
GRAND RAPIDS, Dec. 30-Ap-
proval of the appointment of Arch-
bishop Damaskinos as regent to rule
var-torn Greece until elections areI
held was voiced here tonight by Ev-'
angelos Sekeris, former Minister ofI
Education of the Balkan nation.
"It was a patriotic gesture on the
part of King George to appoint thej
Archbishop in an effort to solidify
the nation," Sekeris declared.
Urges All-Faction Government
Sekeris, who fled from Greece with
other members' of the cabinet when
the invading Axis hordes swept
through the nation, urged, however,
that a Greek government, composed
of all factions involved, be quickly
formed to bring about peace and end
civil unrest.
"Greeks I am sure would rather
fight Germans than each other," he
exclaimed in his heavy accent. Given
to lapsing into rapid Greek, the tall,
heavy set minister uses his hands
to getnover a point when English
fails him.
Sekeris who now is bent on find-
ing a way back to Greece, feels Eng-
land is being maligned for her cur-
rent action in Greece by people who
may not know what the score is.
Sees Nothing Wrong With British
"I did not see in Churchill's action
any desire by the English other thai
to see Greece get a fair chance to
choose its own government.
"What England is doing is a good
thing, only she should not have to
do it alone-it is a problem for all
Allies," he continued, adding it
wouldn't be practical now for his
country to have a plebiscite with one
faction armed and the country in
an "unnormal" state.
Sekeris has been here almost three
years, having left Greece when King
Holiday Fatalities
Reach 40 to Date
P)-The nation's holiday fatali-
ties reached 40 last night as the first
24-hour period of the three-day
New Year's week-end neared a close.
Last year's complete holiday peri-
od cost 242 lives.

George moved his government at the

start of Germrany's invasion. He re- abandonment of important sectors
signed his post with the government of northern Burma by the Japanese
in exile during the summer of 1943. continued today with mounting evi-
Communist Influence Not Strong
"The great mass of Greeks are dence that the enemy does not plan
leftists, but ELAS as such does not to make a major stand north of
represent the mass-at least I don't Mandalay.
think it does," he said, adding, "be- In the past 48 hours British troops
fore the war communists have been have advanced nine miles east to-
represented in the government but ward the town of. Yeu, some 70 miles
their influence was not strong." northwest of Mandalay, and only
"The Greeks must form a peoples' suicide Japanese rearguards are con-
government-when that is done we testing the drive, dispatches to head-
have an army-a very fine army quarters' of Allied Land Forces
which I am sure would fight with Southeast Asia here said today.
pleasure against the war lords of The enemy is beginning to destroy
Germany and Japan." the railroad from Yeu south to
Declaring this civil war wouldn't Monywa which is prime evidence of
exist if allies were more in accord, an intention to continue the south-
Sekeris said "a meeting of the big ward retreat. This railway is the
three is imperative to decide policy backbone of the enemy's supply line
toward liberated countries, It is the north and west of Mandalay.
only way the Greek situation can be Front line reports emphasize that
cleared up and similar struggles else- the Japanese withdrawal is an order-
where forestalled." ly one, not a rout.
TON IGHT at 11:45 P.M.
NEW YEAR'S EVE SH I

By BETTY ROTH
The New Year, 1945, will be rung
in universally at midnight with a
gaiety born of the hope for a Happy
New Year.
In these United States at the
stroke of twelve whistles will blow,
church bells will resound and the
nostalgic strains of "Auld Lang
Syne" be heard through the nation.
For many students on this campus,
those'from other lands, the Ameri-
can celebration of the New Year will
be contrasted with the customs of
their native lands.
Students from the Far and Near
East, for example, explain that
there are two types of celebrations,
the old and traditional and the
new un4er the influence of Wes-
ternization.
In Nigeria, where only 11 per
cent of the population is Christian,

For The e Ya mu
We are well stocked
with CALENDARS, DESK PADS,
STATIONERY, and SUPPLIES.

the New Year is celebrated at har-1
vest time later in the year by thez
Moslems. Their New Year cQrre-t
sponds to the American Thanks-
giving.
On the New Year all boys who have
reached the age of 16 are initiated
into the ceremonial. Costumed and
wearing 'jujubes' (masks) and speak-
ing through bamboo reeds which
give their speech an other-worldly
tone, they represent dead souls re-
awakened for the New Year.
Garbed in this supernatural rai-
ment they chase the young :people.
of the town, carrying long-handled
whips to punish those whose run-
CIDSteel Pa'y
Raise Approved
Vinson Assured Steel I
Prices Will Not Rise
WASHINGTON, Dec. 3.- (A')-;
Stabilization Director Vinson tonight
approved the WLB - recommended
wage increases for CIO steel workers.
His decision was based, an an-
nouncement by the Office of Eco-
nomic Stabilization said, on assur-
ances from the Office of Price Ad-
ministration that steel price boosts
will not result from the pay adjust-
ment.
Vinson's decision was transmitted
to Chairman William H. Davis of
the War Labor Board in a letter
which said:
Receives OPA Report
"I have received a report from the
Office of Price Administration with
reference to the price consequences
of the steel wage increases author-
ized ly your directive order of Nqv.
25, covering the basic iron and steel
industry.
''The OPA states that for some
time increases in the prices of cer-
tain steel products have, in its opin-
ion, been required by law but that,
with the acquiescence of the steel
industry, it has delayed the consider-
ation of these increases until the
wage case was settled, so that, it
would be unnecessary to consider
steel prices more than once.
OPA Conclusions
"The OPA summarizes its conclu-
sions as follows:
Certain product price increases in
the iron and steel industry are now
necessitated by, the minimum re-
quiremnents of la~w.
'These increases will be made irre-
spective of the wage decision. It is
the judgment of the price adminis-
trator that after these price adjust-
ments are made the proposed wage
increases will not require any fur-
ther net rise in the general level of
iron and steel prices.'
"Accordingly, the wage increases
required by your directive order may
become effective'."
BUY WAR BONDS

ning skill is inadequate. The begin-
ning of the Western New Year is
celebrated by Christian Nigerianst
with church services.
Capt. Selim Dagpunar, asked how
the people of Turkey ring in thet
New Year, replied, "Like you."t
There was one important differ-
ence, however,- he ; ointed out.
Turks, being Moslems, drink no
intoxicating liquors. The New Year
is nevertheless a gay holiday. No;
one sleeps on the New Year. Even
invalids rise from their beds; for
they believe that if they are bed-
fast on the New Year's Day they
will remain so for the rest -of the
year. The same superstition makes
gaiety a requirement.
In Armenia, as in Turkey, the chil-
dren receive gifts and the young
people attend the New Year Ball.
Armenians wear their native cos-
tume, ankle - length richly-colored
purple and wine velure robes, yoked
with gold coins. Others go to the
ball masquerading as Faust's "Meph-
istopheles," the Joker and the like.
The lights are extinguished and
turned on again at midnight to indi-
cate the coming of the new year.
The Chinese New Year which
comes a month later is a noisy
celebration, with exploding fire-
crackers welcoming the New Year.
Children kowtow to their parents
and the older members of the fam-
ily. Greetings .are not exchanged
but hung on the door of the home,
the Chinese characters written on
bright red paper. No animal or
protein is to be eaten on the'New
Year.
T. C. Ku, a student, who arrived
here less than a year ago from China,
said that the more educated and
Westernized Chinese pay little atten-
tion to the traditional New Year.
The Latins, at least in Guatemala,
according to Alfredo Pinillos, do not
differ essentially from their North
American neighbors in their celebra-
tion. They too ring in the New Year
with church bells, exploding cannon
fire and firecrackers. Our own tra-
ditional eggnog is, however, replaced
by the fiery tamales and excellent
Guatemalan coffee. The favorite
custom is breaking an egg in a glass
to foretell what the New Year will
bring.

JUDY GARLAND
"MEET ME IN ST. LOUIS"

All Scats
60c, nc. Tax

Official Issuing Agency Here .- Bonds Issued, Day or Night
Shows Continuous from 1 P.M.

STARTS TODAY!

I

11

mi

CLASSIFIED
DIRECTORY

11II

4

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Coin purse containing $26 in
bills. Please return. Serviceman's
wife, baby. Reward. Phone 3819.
ROOMS
COMFORTABLE single room for
neat quiet man or girl willing to
help care for furnace. Walking dis-
tance from campus. 930 Dewey.
Phone 7319.

I

Everything reasonably

Driced.

WAHR'S /odr

s

i

..._. ._

TYPEWRITERS
Office and Portable Models
of all makes
'Bought,
Rented,
Repaired.
STATIONERY & SUPPLIES
0 , * o O ILL
314 South State St.

--NOW SHOWING
LOVE F L EW WITH TI E M
ACROSS PACIFIC 'SKIES!

ii

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li ___

lii

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New Year's Day Dinner
TIWO DOLLARS
(Choice of One)

t

Fresh Shri mp Cock/ail

O)vs/r Cocktail

,._ . /

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Michigan
WED., JAN. 10 - at 8:30
The Funniest Farce Comedy New
York Ever Sent on Tour .
458 Laughs
OIRECT FROM 65 WEEKS IN N.Y.
JOHN GOLDEN presents

Chilled Tomato Juice Fruit Clip
Chicken, Soup a hila imperial
C:ei A- ixcd Oli ad
WHOLE BROILED LIVE LOBSTER - DKAWN BUTTIR
ROAST YOUNG TOM TURKEY - DRESSING
CRANBERRY SAUCE
WHOLE FRIED CHICKEN - ROAST YOUNG DUCK
FILET MIGNON - FROG LEGS
Nlasbcd or I'rcnch Fried Pottlocs
Fresh Peas or Fresh Ca diYuoT e)r

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Fre'sh Ve'eeable Salad
1ot Mince or Pumpkin Pie

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