100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 15, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DEC. 15, 1944

i . ..._

Grand Rapids
School Pickets
Appeal for Aid

I.

PHILIPPINE REPORT: Ward Dispute
Jap Losses Heavily Outnumber Is Only Strike
Yanks in Leyte, Samar Battles in Detroit Area

i
I
i

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., Dec. 14.-
/P)-Striking public school mainte-
nance workers tonight received full
support of all Grand Rapids Ameri-
can Federation of Labor unions, Al
Groenink, manager of the Interna-
tional Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Ware-
housemen and Helpers (AFL), an-
nounced.
The strikers, members of the Build-
ing Employes Union (AFL), had ap-
pealed for help to both AFL and CIO
locals.
Both labor groups planned to vote
on the issue Thursday night. With
outside help in picketing, the custod-
ian group outlined a plan to stop
deliver of coal at schools Friday.
Meantime the Board of Education
retaliated by asserting there is en-
ough coal on hand to last through
the holidays.
The union called a strike last
Monday in an effort to gain wage
increases and for the past three days
paramount question in Grand Rap-
ids has been whether or not there is
a strike. Board of Education offices
are besieged with calls from parents
asking should they send children to
school.
John M. Brower, President of the
Board, today offered through State
Labor Mediator Walter Patterson to
take back 29 workers, whom he said
automatically quit when they failed
to show up for work, if they would
ask for reinstatement individually.
The offer was rejected by 45 union
members late Thursday.

GENERAL MACARTHUR'S HEAD-
QUARTERS, Philippines, Dec. 15--
(-)-The Japanese have lost 82,554
men in the campaigns on Leyte and
Samar Islands, headquarters an-
nounced today.
American casualties were 2,176
killed, 7,976 wounded and 257 miss-
ing, for a total of 10,409, Gen. Doug-
las MacArthur said.
It was estimated that at least 30,-
000 Japanese were killed or drowned
from ten convoys attempting to re-
inforce the enemy garrison on Leyz.
Japs Abandon Dead
The Japanese abandoned 33,801 of
their dead on the battlegrounds and
253 of their men were taken prison-
er by U. S. forces.
MacArthur estimated Japanese cas-
ualties not yet accounted for in
headquarters reports and casualties
to Nipponese within their own lines
numbered 18,500.
Headquarters also reported that the
Throop Gives
First Lecture

E

s7 to t s+ ,c , # e -i i f t i e' A- C I

U. S. 77th Division had advanced one '00 )1I IrIi cUU nt uix i
mile north of Ormoc, main port of Settled; Work Resumed
western Leyte Island which was tak-
en from the Japanese last Sunday By The Associated Press
as a consequence of the December 7 DETROIT, Dec. 14.- With the
landings by American forces in the Fruehauf Trailer Co. strike ending
rear of the enemy's Yamashita line. Thursday and the Bohn Aluminum
Japs Hold Out I & Bras Corp. walkout ending Friday,
The 77th is driving up the Ormoc I the only major labor dispute remain-
corridor, in the rear of the main body ing in the Detroit area was the Mont-
of Japanese still holding out on the gomery Ward & Co. strike.
island. At Saginaw, however, some 3,000
The 32nd U. S. Infantry Division employes of the Schust Baking Divi-
is exerting pressure on the enemy sion. Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co., struck
from the upper or northern end. in protest against what unionists
The Japanese casualties for the described as refusal of the company
Philippine invasion are by far the to grant a $25 Christmas bonus.
greatest of any thus far in the three Two Stores Picket
years of islan dwarfare in the Paci- Employes of four Montgomery
fic. Ward stores, two in Detroit, one in
,.ar-orn-and-,he -other in _oya

By KENNETH L. DIXON
Associated Press War Correspondent
IN GERMANY, Dec. 6-As seen.
from a ditch, the two tall trees made
a perfect picture frame through
which the column slowly advanced.
The men walked upward along a
gradually rising ridge, entering the
picture one by one. Each drab, mud-
dy outline held the scene a moment as
it topped the crest.. It seemed sus-
pended there against the gray, smoky
sky just before it stumbled on.
Sharp through the rumbling un-
dertones of the frontline fighting
came the whispering, warning siz-
zle of mortar after mortar, each
seeming to shriek "ssshhh! ssshhh!
--bidding the war be still until it
spoke. And as each whooshing
whistle died, somehow a split sec-
ond's synthetic silence was wrought
as each ear and eye and nerve
awaited the coming blast.
Through it all the doughboys walk-
ed slowly grim, strained-ten paces
apart.

Sometimes when a shell landed too
close they hit the dirt, but mostly
they just kept moving. Twice men
were hit. The column paused briefly.
Then it flowed forward again with
sticky reluctance, like heavy motor
oil on a cold morning.
The dead of the company up
ahead still lay where they had fal-
len. The pathway was narrow and
mines were thick on both sides.
Heavy-footed doughboys stepped
carefully over the -bodies of men
they'd swapped cigarettes with just
a few hours before.
Some turned their eyes aside. Some
stared, fearful and with magnetized
fascination, at the torn bodies.
Strangely there seemed to be no
wounded on the slope. Only the
walking and the dead.
There was a complete absence
of human sound. No one shouted
orders, cried out or talked. They
just pushed on toward an invisible
enemy. Their job was to concen-

trate powerfully on putting one foot
ahead of the other regardless of
what happened.
Watching them do it made you
begin to tremble and you weren't sure
why. These men displayed no hero-
ics, no hate, no enthusiasms, no cru-
sading zeal.
There seemed to be nothing what-
soever to help spur them on. But they
marched. Their steps seemed to
drum into your brain. These men
didn't want to go forward. That was
heartbreakingly clear in every line
of their flinching forms.
It was even more clear that they
would not stop short of that inferno
beyond them.
With the resignation of the
damned, their forward motion had
become grimly irresistible. And
you knew that if they fell others
would follow and they too would
keep on going.
Reluctant heroes-Len paces
apart.

SEES MOVING 'PICKET FENCE:

_

Reporter Describes Front Line Battle

i

Next highest on the list is Saipan,
where 26,277 Japanese were killed
and 2,068 taken prisoner. The U. S.
casualties there were 3,049 dead,
13,054 woundedand 368 missing, the
highest of any island invasion.
The U. S. advance north of Ormoc
reported today further closes the jaws
of a vise on enemy force trapped in
the corridor.
May Polly Move!
From Kitchen?

Dearborn and the other in Royal
Oak, continued to maintain picket
lines in front of the buildings while
leaders of their union were in Wash-
ington attending a War Labor Board
hearing into the dispute.
The Fruehauf strike, which affec-
ted 1,300 workers, had held up pro-
duction of truck trailers used to
transport war materials. The work-
crs, members of Local 99, United
Automobile Workers (CIO), had re-
jected three previous appeals to end
their week-end walkout before they
voted to return to their jobs.
Bohn's Employes Return
The 500 employes in Bohn's No. 3
plant will return to work Friday,
officials of the company and union

V

4 MONTH INTENSIVE
Course for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUAi
A thorough, intensive course-start-
ing February, ,July, October.
Registration now open.
Regular day and evening school
throughout the year. Catalog,
A SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
PREFERRED BY COLLEGE MEN AND WOMEN
THE GREGG COLLEGE
President, John Robert Gregg, S.C.D.
Director. Paul M. Pair. M.A,
Deft 8 N. Mlkgau Ave Tet STAt 18,81 Chcago 2,

Prof. Palmer A. Throop, in deliver-
'ing the opening French lecture of the
series yesterday, discussed the tech-
nique used by the Papacy to popu-
larize the Crusades in the 13th cen-
tury.
Enthusiasm was waning, Prof.
Throop said, due to failure of prev-
ious expeditions, and the public was
unwilling to throw itself into a simi-
lar venture. People , did not care to
give ip the comforts of their life at
home, he stated, undergoing the
difficulties and dangers of a long
journey.
To combat the excuses they offered,
the Papacy was forced to use its most
persuasive methods. The Crusades
were preached not only in the chur-
ches, but in public squares, and even
at the_ tournaments. Each Crusader
was given a cross which he wore on
the right shoulder, and absolution
for sins was offered in advance to
anyone who would join the move-
ment.

I

WASITNGTON.flDec.14-(11")- Al

Vermont lady whose house stands announced. The workers, who staged
'right smack on an international a one-day walkout, voted Wednes-
day to return but a company inven-
boundary-half in Canada and half tory held up resumption of produc-

in this country-has a problem overj
her pet parrot.
Is it okay, she asked the U.S. Public
Health Service today, to move Polly
from the kitchen, which is in Canada,
into the living room, which is in the
United States- without violating
quarantine regulations.
(Before a parrot can be brought
into this country, it must be exam-
ined to see if it is free of psittacosis,
a bird disease which is communicable
to man.)

I --

tion.
Emil A. Willman, president of
Local 87, United Dairy & Bakery
Workers (CIO), said at Saginaw that
the Loose-Wiles Company agreed
tentatively, a year ago, to pay a
Christmas bonus if it were financially
able.
BUY WAR BONDS

t
f
T

i
i
I
i
f

°9 k/ant a INCOAT
(op Ch ri tmaSPl

-

"
i
i
I

i

'i

Editor's Note: Contributions to this col- commissioned a second lieutenant in
unin should be addressed to the Military the R.O.T.C. upon his graduation
editor, The 'Michigan Daily, Student in June, 1942 with a B. A. degree.
Publications Building. A geograpl y major, Capt. Easlick
Staff Sergeant ROBERT E. WEN- was a member of Phi Kappa Psi as a
DUNG, who left for the armed for-- student here.
ces after completing two years at the According to the citation accom-
University is now stationed in Eng- panying the award, Capt. Easlick
land, his sister reports. showed courage and professional skill
A student in the School of Busi- in reorganizing his troops while under
ness Administration and a member of attack by the enemy, his bravery
Beta Theta Pi while at the Univer- serving as an example of great in-
sity, Sgt. Wendling entered the in- spiration to his men.
fantry, was trained at Camp Bland-*' *.
ing, Fla., entered the A.S.T.P. engi- A graduate of the University with a
neering program at Pratt Institute, B. A. degree in 1939, Capt. AL FINK-
Brooklyn, N. Y. and received final ELSTEIN is now serving as a Y-
training at Camp Breckenridge, Ky., Force liason officer training an ar-
before being shipped overseas in 1 tillery unit of the Chinese Expedi-

Ificiqtan }en at k/ar

i
'

II

.7eaturin.J JIMMY STRAUSS ani ih3

Orcte-ilra

TICKETS . . . 2.00 per
Tickets On Sole at the Main Desk . .
EAR'S CELEBRATED...-

Couplet
December 19, 1944
11:00 PM, DEC 30th

NEW Y

geep 141We
fo 45

a
LR'S DANCE

NEW YEA

- r-a rn orir s ewr wrrs rn sMnwe arwewn wio awir

\~

c

I N F O R M A L

r
;<<
'?' ,.+
F
Q
r
,. .
50 ."
..; Y" ..
a
i.
a'a .. , ,..
i, '. e..; ,;;a. r?
P
i.. 5°,.
' .;?:
'h},
:} F:; ;, ;::;:;:

T n.
11 i0:
J ' .'.
.
., '.
" . : fir''':; ;.': "
., h
} .. f: ::'f 4
1. ' " Vr}KH
.. !, f f., % '. 5
a f}
.{

MICHIGAN UNION .

. in the RAINBOW

ROOM

N

ovember.

A Silver Star for gallantry has
been awarded to Capt. DAVID K.'
EASLICK, a University grad now
fighting with the 30th Infantry Di-
vision in Europe.
Son of Dr. K. A. Easlick of the
School of Dentistry, the captain was

tionary Force in Western Yunnan
Province.
When the Chinese launche dtheir
attack against the Japanese across
the Salween River last May, Capt.
Finkelstein supervised the firing of
Chinese artillerymen as they blasted
the enemy on the other side of the
river.

t
i
c
z

:;.,.. :

i

N

' } a .
, ?
e ! e ,.,
t -m-
"'
.s^- ^. o.."
[
[ f
-. r
F a
1

New Guinea, Oct. 24, 1944
"Dear Aunt Ruth:
Have been moving about now for months and weeks and days - and by
chance - part by accident - in all this tine - some mail caught up with me,
and it was your "Michigan Daily." Quite a surprise and pleasant no end - then
I moved to a new address and hope other copies come.
While a transient and reading the Dailys - met up with some other Michigan
men (before my time) and even tho it was years since heard or saw A.A. they
ate up the papers with a passion. More valuable than money out here. Common
interest and memories.
Just getting settled now (I hope) and hope I can stay at the present position.
Nice location and fine weather (in co parison) and well- o.k. in general.
Time to {punch the clock' now. Will let you know- how things are. I really
appreciate your sending "The Daily" way out here in New Guinea and will never
be able to thank you enough.
Hope you have a desirable winter (as for weather).
Most grateful,
John D. Woolever (Ensign)"
-from letter of John D. Woolever to Mrs. Ruth iuchinan

In the Casual Shop

And this is the kind she wants . . . a shimmering
Elkskin All-Weather Coat. Give her the unusual
gift-practical as well as beautiful! See our tail-
ored, belted and cape models in tan, navy, black,
natural and lavender. Misses' sizes.
19.95
Other All-Weather Coats in tailored and draw-
. 1 _ _ '~i'"i n &_r ZG OI

I

S 11
end

HIM

a Daily

cute convoys to help

Subscription

for

X inas

i

..4 -1LI

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan