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December 03, 1944 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DEC. 3,

Wallace Visits
Michigan State
EAST LANSING, DEC. 2-(/P)-
Vice President Henry A. Wallace,
here to study Michigan State College
agriculture and its new basic college
curriculum, said today he had made
no plans for after Jan. 20, when his
term expires, and that his visit to the
college had no political implications.
When asked if he were a willing
partner in an attempt to groom him
as a 1948 presidential candidate, he
said, without further comment, that
he was "more interested in 1946."
The vice president said he had two
principal reasons for visiting the col-
lege: to-get more information on the
basic college

GUILD PROGRAMS:
Churches Schedule Speakers,
Retreat, Conference for Today

Leningrad

. . .

MICHIGAN MEN AT WAR I

Outstanding speakers from the
University and city are included in
the guild programs today as well as
a Catholic retreat and a Lutheran
student conference.
Dr. Carolus P. Harry, secretary of
the board of education of the United
Lutheran Church, will be the speaker
at the meeting of the Lutheran Stu-
dent Association at 5 p. m. today in
the Zion Parish Hall. He will also
be heard at the Bible study class at 9
a. m. in the fireplace room of Lane
Hall which will open the second day

CHRISTMAS GIFTS'
~ tFOLLETT'S1
Do your1
Christmas shopping
at FOLLETT'S
}4
NOVELS
EARTH AND HIGH HEAVEN
Gwethalyn Graham $2.50
IMMORTAL WIFE-Irving 'Stone $3.00
THE RAZOR'S EDGE-W. Somerset Maugham, $2.75 14
LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN-Ben Ames Williams, $2.50
HARD FACTS-Howard Spring $2.50
THE GREEN YEARS-A. J. Cronin $2.50, 4
STRANGE FRUIT-Lillian Smith $2.75
"E il
NONWFICTION
YANKEE FROM OLYMPUS
Catherine Drinker Bowen $3.00 4
THE TIME FOR DECISION--Sumner Welles $3.00
THE WORLD OF WASHINGTON IRVING
Van Wyck Brooks $3.75
CAESAR AND CHRIST-Will Durant $5.00
BETWEEN HEAVEN AND EARTH
Franz, Werfel $3.00
TRY AND STOP ME-Bennett Cerf .$3.00
THE GENTLEMEN TALK OF PEACE
William B. Ziff ..... $3 00
We have a Large Selection
of CHRISTMAS CARDS
and WRAPPINGS -
Buy at
rr
FOLLETT'S
State Street at North University

of the Ohio Valley Association con-
ference. The concluding session will
begin at 2 p. in.
Jean Billmeier, SN, will summarize
the results of the conference of the
International Association of Luth-
eran Students held last month at
Chicago at the Gamma Delta meet-
ing today. The group will meet first
for supper at 5 p. in. at the Lutheran
Student Center.
Starting at mass today, Catholic
students are invited to participate in
a three-day retreat at St. Mary's
Student Chapel. A conferenceafor
women will be held at 5:10 p. m. to-
morrow. Men will meet at 5:10 p. in.
Tuesday while a general conference
is scheduled at 7:30 p. m. on both
days.
Prof. John L. Brumm, chairman of
the Department of Journalism, will
be the speaker at the Wesleyan Guild
meeting at 5 p. m. at the First Meth-
odist Church. Supper and fellowship
hour will follow the talk.
"The Negro in Song and Story"'
will be the topic of Dr. James Brett
Kenna, minister at the Methodist
Church, when he addressesmembers
of the Roger Williams group at the
5 p.m. today at the Baptist Guild
House. A cost supper will be held
afterwards.
Peter Ostafin of the sociology de-
partment will speak on "What I Be-
lieve About the Community" at the
Congregational-Disciples Guild to-
day . The group will meet at 5 p. in.
at the Congregational Church for a
social hour and supper before the
program. Louie King, V-12, USNR,
will lead the service.
The Westminster Guild will con-
tinue their series on belief at 5 p. m.
today at the First Presbyterian
Church with Dr. Leroy Waterman,
chairman of the Department of Or-
iental Language, as speaker. He will
talk on "What I Believe-About the
Bible."
Prof. David Owen of the speech
department will discuss "Cereal Ser-
ials," an accounting of the psychol-
ogy of the radio drama at 5 p. in. to-
day at the First Unitarian Church.
The student group will have a snack
supper before the talk.
Following the Choral Evening
Prayer, the Canterbury Club of St.
Andrew's Episcopal Church will meet
at 6 p. mn. at the Student Center. Holy
Communion will be planned for 7:15
a. in. Wednesday with breakfast serv-
ed for students afterwards.
The Bethlehem Evangelical and
Reformed Church will hold their stu-
dent Guild at 5 p. in. today. The
Youth Forum of the Grace Bible Fel-
lowship will meet at 6:30 p.m. at
the Masonic Temple.
Millage Rate To Be
Decided at Election
More than 3,000 voters residing in
Ann Arbor school district 1 will
.decide tomorrow whether or not the
millage rate on the district's property
should be increased over a five-year
period to raise funds for local school
building improvements.
In addition, a proposal to create a
sinking fund through which addi-
tional funds might be segregated, will
be voted upon. Polls will be open at
the Ann Arbor High and Bach
schools from 1 to 8 p.m.

(Continued from Page 1)
stated that "humanity and world
culture has been saved from the Nazi
menace. Today we can continue our
research in laboratories and librar-
ies."
Faculty and campus leaders con-
tacted last night agreed that this
was a message of genuine friend-
ship aimed "at promoting better
understanding between the stu-
dents of both nations."
Hearing of the message, Mme.
Pargment, professor of Russian lit-
erature here, was elated that "most
of the students were going back to
their university in Leningrad" and
she paid tribute to the work of Rus-
sian\ educators and students during
the war.
The message was signed by the
Rector of University of Leningrad,
Professor A. Vosnesensky, and ended
with a plea for world unity to "strike
the final blow against the barbaric
hordes of Hitler Germany."

Editor's Note: Contributions to this col-
umn should be addressed to Michigan
Men at War. The Michigan Daily, Stu-
dent Publications Building.
Serving with the 15th Air Force in
Italy are Staff Sergeant JOSEPH
FREIN, tail gunner on a B-24 Lib-
erator, and First Lieutenant IVAN
L. HANSON, a fighter pilot recently
assigned to a veteran P-51 Mustang
group. A former student at the Uni-
versity, Sgt. Frein entered the arm-
ed forces in July, 1942. Lt. Hanson#
attended the University for three
years before entering the Air Force in,
July, 1941.
First Lieutenant BILL SLOCUM,
JR., B. Ad., '41, is instructing men
in parachute jumping in New
Guinea. While at the University,
Lt. Slocum was a member ofMi-
chigama, Mimes and Sphinx hon-
orary societies, served on the Men's
Judiciary Council and played in the
Michigan Union Opera.

A member of the Engineering
and Manufacturing Division at
the Office of the Chief of Ord-
nance, Detroit, HERBERT J.
HOWERTIH, '44, member of Lamb-
da Chi Alpha, was promoted to
the rank of first lieutenant.
Lt. Howerth received his B. E.
in Michanical Engineering while
serving with an Army unit at the
University.
Already holder of the Distinguish-
ed Flying Cross and the Air Medal
with three oak leaf clusters, First
Lieutenant SWIFT TARBELL, JR.,
whose mother resides in Ann Arbor,
now conducts a class in aircraft tac-
tics for aerial gunners at a B-24

Liberatort heavy bixmber
England.

A geography and geology major
at the University before entering
service two years ago, Lt. Tarbell
is in charge of training programs
whereby combat gunners are kept
in practice, replacement gunners
are checked out on the equipment
used in combat and ground soldiers
are trained in gunnery in order to
qualify for reclassification as aerial
gunners and assignment to combat
crews.
Before his assignment as instruct-
or, Lt. Howerth participated in 35
missions as bombardier and nose tur-
ret gunner of a B-24 Liberator bom-
bardment group in England.

base in

Yuletide Military Ball.
at CHARLES McKENNY HALL
Cross Street, Ypsilanti

A look out for stray planes return-
Sigma Nu To Meet ing from raids over Europe, Pfc.
g ELMER F. MADAR, a student at the
All members of the Sigma Nu fra- Universlty when he entered the arm-
ternity are urged to attend their ed forces in July, 1942, is now sta-
chapter meeting at 3 p.m. today in tioned with the Second Bombardment
the Michigan Union. The room num- Division at an Eighth Air Force fight-
ber will be posted in the lobby. er station in England.

DECEMBER 8th
SEMI-FORMAL

8:30 to 12:30
$1.00 PER PERSON

4

University Students and Friends Cordially Invited
Sponsored by the Ypsilanti Civil Air Patrol
Tickets at BARTH'S, William Street

-___ _.. _ _. _ _ i

r ..

Collins Shoppe offers you o variety of
gift suggestions. For all feminine
names on your list-



Soft, warm, bright sweaters for everyone! Long
pullovers and cardigan styles. All wool pastels,
black, white.
Tops for now! Scarfs, lacy fascinators for that'
very particular person. Warm, flattering, col-

WAR BONDS
RING THE
BELL TH1
CHRISTMAS

At

BUY WAR BONDSI

orful-in wool, rayon, and lacy types.

*

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION

*

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

SUNDAY, DEC. 3, 1944

BRUCE HILKENE, soph-
omore end of the Wolver-
ine football team was
selected captain for the
1945 season at the team's
annual banquet held Tues-
day. The title of "Most
Valuable Player" was
awarded to Don Lund.
Fritz Crisler, Wolverine
mentor, served as the main
speaker of the day, and he
lauded this year's squad,
which won eight out of
their scheduled ten en-
counters, as "one of the
greatest teams that I have
ever been associated with,"
and he hit a high point
when he stated that, "I
have never seen a more gal-
lant fight by any football
team than that shown on
the field at Columbus last
Saturday by this team."
VICTOR HEYLIGER
was named to succeed Edie
Lowrey as hockey mentor
by Athletic Director Fritz
Crisler. Heyliger, for-
mer University of Michi-
gan-hockey star and team
coach for tyo years, gain-
ed a reputation as one of
the best hockey players
ever to don a Michigan
uniform and was chosen
31I Mir-Wst t cnter in

join the select circle of
Michigan's nine-lettermen.
He has received three foot-
ball letters, two each in
basketball and baseball and
will probably receive a
third in each sport before
graduation.
THE ASSOCIATED
Press All-Western Confer-
ence football team this
year includes two members
of the 1944 Michigan foot-
ball squad, tackle Milan
Lazetich and quarterback
Joe Ponsetto. The selec-
tions were made by Big
Ten coaches and their aids.
The men selected from the
Michigan eleven are both
playing their first season
as regulars and were big
factors in Michigan's des-
perate bid for the Confer-
ence title.
THE SIXTH War Loan
Drive which began Nov. 20
is well under way with the
students and faculty thus
far pledging $28,133 of the
$100,000 quota assigned to
the University. The sales
at the end of the second
week are almost five times
greater than the total of
the previous week. Fran-

ONE OF THE first WACs
to serve in India, Margaret
E. Brewster, holder of an
M.S. at Michigan, last
week was commissioned a
second lieutenant in the
U.S. Army upon gradua-
tion from OCS at the
'Third WAC Training Cen-
ter, Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. At
the time she was notified
to report to Ft. Oglethorpe,
she was stationed at South-
east Asia Command Head-
quarters, Kandy, Ceylon,
as chief clerk in the Adju-
tant-General's office. She
was one of the first eight
WAC's to arrive in India,
and was stationed at New
Delhi before headquarters
were moved to Kandy. Be-
fore entering service, Lt.
Brewster served for three
years with the Red Cross
as a First Aid instructor.
ALREADY HOLDER of
the Distinguished Flying
Cross and the Air Medal
with three oak leaf clus-
ters, First Lieutenant Swift
Tarbell, Jr., whose mother
resides in Ann Arbor, now
conducts a class in aircraft
tactics for aerial gunners
at a B-24 Liberator heavy
bomber base in England.

Lovely Eisenberg Jewelry acces-
sories. Colorful lapel pins, clips,
earrings and bracelets-all grand
for gifts-dressy and tailored
designs. Also Eisenberg Col-

Hankies of lovely sheer prints,
whites, pastels-to delight any

ognes, lipsticks,

and perfume

lady fair. Initialed,

novelty

sticks.
Fine leather compacts. In plain
or ornamented leather with cigar-

2

v

ette cases to match.
they are smart.

Sturdy as

styles, too.
r \

PICTURE- Pretty as a
picture was verdict of a
committee of artists on
Milena Morgan, voted
most photogenic of you-
nger singers.
FOUR INSTRUCTORS
have been added to the
staff of JAG school, Major
Bernhard W. Alden as re-
&.nxh ssah nt in the

What you need for warmth, come
winter-a colorful pair of mocosox-
wool with soft leather sole. Practical

as well as eye-appealing.

I

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