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November 19, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, NOV. 19, 1944

WolverinesD
IRISH RECOVER!
Brennan Steals Limelight as
Notre Dame Whips Wildcats
SOUTH BEND, IND., NOV. 18-UP)-Jim Brennan, 155 pounds of
backfield dynamite, gave 48,000 fans cause to forget the loss of Bob Kelly,
Notre Dame's ace halfback, as he exploded twice in the first seven minutes
of play to lead the Ramblers to a 21-0 victory over Northwestern today.
The stocky, 18-year-old freshman from Milwaukee blasted his way
through the Northwestern line and scampered 41 yards for a touchdown,
with the crowd scarcely had settled in its seats. Four minutes later he
hit off right tackle, reversed his field's ---

'own Fighting

#takmn9 the IoS aung
By HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

and danced his way through the
Wildcat secondary for another touch-
down.
After that, the Ramblers settled
down to a primary defensive game,
halted every Northwestern attempt
to get across the 25-yard line and
then, as an anti-climax, staged a 50-
yard drive late in the third period
that culminated in a touchdown by
Marty Wendell on the third play of
the foturth quarter.
But Brennan was the whole show
as Notre Dame, bruised and battered
by Navy and Army the last two
weeks, returned to the victory col-
umn. The Ramblers were minus1

their two first
Pat Filley and
tion to Kelly.
Northwestern
Sickels
Golan
R. Justak
O'Malley
Lightfoot
Powers
Morris
Yungwirth
Funderburg
Altepeter
Clawson
Northwestern
Notre Dame

string guards, Capt.
Fred Rovai, in addi-
Pos Notre Dame
LE Benigni
LT Mergenthal
L G Martz
C Szymanski
RG Westenkircher
R T Sullivan
RE Way Right
Q B Dancewicz
L H Brennan
R H Marino
F B Gasparella
0 0 0 *0- 0
14 0 0 7-21,

Sailors Tk
Marquette 32-0
For Eighth Win
By JERRY LISKA
GREAT LAKES, ILL., NOV. 18-
(P)-Great Lakes' sturdy Bluejackets,
playing reserves most of the way and
minus Coach Paul Brown, rolled over
Marquette University 32-0 today for
their eighth triumph of the season
against a lone defeat by Ohio State
and a tie with Purdue.
Bluejacket mentor Brown was in
South Bend, Ind., scouting the Notre
Dame-Northwestern game, but his
team had little trouble brushing aside
Marquette for the second time in two
weeks.4The Bluejackets won the first
game 45-7.
First String Produces Lead
First stringers accounted for Great
Lakes' first three touchdowns in 16
minutes of play and then Bluejacket
reserves took over against a game but
out-manned Marquette team whose
farthest advance was to Great Lakes'
29 in the final period.
End Jim Eane paced the Bluejacket'
scoring with a pair of touchdowns,
the first on a 21-yard pass from Jim
Youel on the opening play of the
second period, and the second on the
game's outstanding play-a two-man
90-yard return of Marquette's kick-j
off starting the second half.
Lateral Provides Thrilling Score
On the latter play, reserve half-
back Jim Delaney galloped to mid-
field from his 10 after receiving the
kickoff and flipped a lateral to Keane,
who sprinted 47 yards to score.

I: -
Editor's Note: This column is written by Ed Zalenski, former Daily Sports Editor
and now a lieutenant in the Infantry, who has recently returned to Ann Arbor
on leave.
By LT. ED. ZALENSKI
(OURAGE is not a monopoly of the battlefields of war. Any Wolverine
fan will tell you that, after watching the game uphill fight of Tom
Kuzma and Julie Franks, two of Michigan's gridiron immortals, or the
amazing comeback of Howard "Jeep" Mehaffey after a six-year absence
from the football field. But how many students realize that another
Varsity athlete. has been battling courageously for the right to take his
place with his fellow American soldiers?
This story dates back to the fall of 1940 when a dark-haired youth
came down from Northern Michigan to take a crack at Coach Ken
Doherty's track team. He had been a fair miler in high school, but
not exceptional. The name of Ernie Leonardi meant little to sports
fans and even less to Chet Stackhouse who was coaching the freshman
team that year. But it was destined to mean a lot more within the
next three years.
Leonardi showed a lot of stuff right from the start. I was a member
of the same squad, but not in his class. Ernie caught Stack's eye from
the start and it wasn't long before the barrel-chested miler was hanging
up freshman records from a half-mile up to two miles. It was easy for
me to notice his rapid progress and I'll always remember that it was he
who paced me to the best half-mile I ever ran as a trackman at Michigan.
This is Ernie's story so I'll fade out here.
The first year was over and it was there in the books. Leonardi
had broken records and had estiblashed new ones. His highlight
performances included a 4:26 mile and a terrific indoor two-mile race in
which he chased the great Ralph Schwartzkopf, former Wolverine
distance runner, across the finish line. Ralph ran 9:41 and Ernie was
right behind.
Since this is not a recapitulation of his individual performances I
won't bother with the number of firsts, seconds and thirds he won, nor
will I rehash his time foi' these events. He won dual and triangular meets
and was the only sophomore to place in the Big Ten that spring. It was
apparent to everyone that Leonardi was on the way to championship per-
formances.
HE THIRD year came and it appeared that Leonardi had found his niche
in the two-mile with Bob Hume dogging him in every race. He started
off well with victories in several dual meets. The Indoor Conference in
Chicago that spring caught him off guard and he had to be content with
a fourth behind the same Hume.
Shortly after the return from Chicago, the Michigan ROTC, of
which Leonardi was a member, was called to active duty, and there
was a long period when Ernie had to be inactive. Finally, he returned
to complete the semester and turned in one of his greatest perform-
ances in the mud at Evanston, Ill., to place in the Outdoor two-mile
run in May.
With the end of the semester came basic training for all ROTC men.
They still talk about the forced march that Leonardi put his platoon
through at Camp Wolters, Tex. It seems that he started double-timing
at the start, and when 10 miles were up he was still going strong while
his platoon was stretched for miles behind him, either in agony or un-
conscious.
Ernie came back to Michigan after completing basic training and
looked forward to the day when he could run again. Last Christmas,
he went home on a furlough. One night, while driving with a friend
on an icy road, fate stepped in and the result was a twisted pile of
wreckage and two seriously injured men. Leonardi fractured his col-
lar bone, dislocated his hip and suffered numerous other painful
abrasions and contusions. The months that followed were tough ones
for him.
LEONARDI moved from hispital to health service, health service to
hospital for the next eight months in an effort to get back to normal.
The shoulder bone knitted beautifully, but calcification developed in the
hip joint. And it's there today. Ernie realizes that he'll never run as
he used to for Michigan, and has resigned himself to it. His fight now is
to get back on general duty and do his share with his buddies overseas.
And while recuperating he has been doing clerical work with one of the
ASTP units located in the East Quadrangle. Certainly, Leonardi's long
battle is proof that gameness and courage are not limited to the battle-
field.

Badge.
Lions To Battle
With Bears for
Second Place
DETROIT Nov 18 -- 4()- Any
hopes the Detroit Lions may nourish
toward finishing second in the Na-
tional Football League's Western Di-
vision will get a thorough test here
tomorrow when the Bengals engage
the Chicago Bears, whom they tied
21 to 21 in Chicago last month.
The season's largest pro grid turn-!
out here is expected to jam Briggs
Stadium as the Lions try for their
first win over the Bears since their.
17 to 14 triumph in 1940. Detroit,
with three wins and one tie in seven
starts this season, must' down the
Bears to wind up as Western Division
runners-up to the pace-setting Green
Bay Packers.
Ensign Sid Luckman, the Bears'
merchant mariner quarterback who
missed the earlier contest with the
Lions, is expected to arrive by plane
from his station in the east in time
for the kickoff.
With Luckman a likely starter,
Coach Charles E. (Gus) Dorais of the
Lions must devise a means of stop-
ping a Bear offense that rates as one
of the best-balanced in the League.
The former Columbia University
flinger has completed 51 of 97 pitches
this season for 747 yards and eight
touchdowns while a teammate, Gene
Ronzani, has clicked on 19 of 39 for
363 yards and five scores. Ronzani's
passing accounted for all three Bear
touchdowns in Chicago's earlier tie
with the Lions.
In the running department, four
Chicagoans are high among the
league leaders, Henry Margarita, Al
Grygo; Gary Famiglietti and Jim
Fordham each boasting averages of
better than four yards a carry.
As has been the case all season, the
Detroit attack willbewrapped up in
the running and throwing of Frank
Sinkwich and Bob Westfall.
A sensational duel in the line is
expected at center, where Detroit's
veteran Alex Wojciechowicz, scrap-
ping for all-league honors, mixes it
with the Bears' Clyde (Bulldog) Tur-
ner, named to the mythical all-star
outfit three years straight.
Attendance is expected to ap-
proach last season's record of 48,118
which saw the Bears nose out the
Lions here, 27 to 21.

Eleven,

(Continued from Page 1)
Culligan's pass from midfield was
batted into the ag by Badger left
end, Jack Mead, and recovered by
Clarence Esser on Michigan's 39. Two

covered. Culligan intercepted a
stray Badger pass two plays later,
but the half ended as Renner drop-
ped Culligan's desperation heave in
the end zone.
The second half was almost a repi-
tition of the first. Following a Mich-
igan drive which was halted on the
Wisconsin 27, the Badgers began to
roll, marching 46 yards in 13 plays
to the Wolverine 27 before losing
the ball on downs.
Wisconsin Hampered by Fumbles
Undaunted, the Badgers started
another drive after forcing the Wol-
verines to kick, this time getting to
the Michigan 37 before a fumble,
recovered by Renner halted the ad-
vance. The Wolverines again could
not gain and were forced to kick.
Cox's return punt was taken by
Chubb on his own 15, who handed it
to Weisenburger. Weisenburger, aid-
ed by a beautiful block by center
Harold Watts who mowed down two
would-be tacklers, came back to the
Michigan 35. Three plays later Lund
got away for his 56-yard sprint which
sewed up the game.
The Badgers made one more des-
perate bid in the dying minutes, pen-
etrating to the Wolverine seven-
yard-line, but another fumble snuf-
fed out their chances as the final gun
sounded a moment later.

14-0

1

Touchdowns by Lund,
Culligan Spark Team
Michigan Scores in First, Last Qnarters;
Wisconsin Tops Wolverines in First Downs

DON LUND

Spartans Elect Captain
EAST LANSING, .. OV. 16-(Z)-
T. Brady Sullivan, 26, a junior from
Steubenville, Ohio, was elected hon-
orary captain of the 1944 Michigan
State College football team today by
the 22 major letter winners.
Sullivan, who played center, is de-
ferred from military service while
studying veterinary medicine. He
played in all of the Spartans" games.

running plays and a pass failed to
gain, and T. A. Cox, fullback, punted
out of bounds on the 14.
Wolverines Connect on Pass
Most of the second quarter was
played in Michigan territory, but in
the final minutes the Wolverines un-
leashed their aerial attack to drive to
the 23. Left end Art Renner hauled
down one of Culligan's tosses on the
10, but Michigan was offside. An-
other pass to Renner carried to the
28, but two plays later Chubb fum-
bled Lund's lateral, and Esser re-

M
First downs by rushing .... 2
First downs by passing . ... 3
First downs by penalties .. 1
Total first downs...........6
Net yards rushing........188
Net yards passing......... 46
Total yards gained (net) . .234
Forward passes attempted.. 11
Forward passes completed 3
Passes intercepted by .......2
Punts, number .............7
Punting average..........35.3
Yards kicks returned .......14
Fumbles................ 3
Fumbles recovered by .......5
Penalties, yards ...........15

W
11
1
15
184
57
241
12
4
1
6
28
152
12
2
25

UNIlVE'RSITY fGRIllI
-a
II WILLIAM STREET - THIRD DOOR FROM STATE
UPSTAIRS - Phone 9268
You may make Resertations Now for
THANKSGIVING DINNER
Roast Chicken, Southern Stuffing 1.75
New Orleans Chicken and Shrimp Gumbo 1.60
OTHER DINNERS:
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I t

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FOOTBALL FINALS

By The Associated Press
EAST
Army 62, Pennsylvania 7.
Navy 32. Purdue 0.
Syracuse 43, Colgate 13.
Yale 13, North Carolina 6.
Cornell 14, Dartmouth 13.
Brown 12, Columbia 0.
Penn State 34, Maryland 19.
N.Y.U. 13, Brooklyn 7.4
SOUTH
Alabama 19, Mississippi State 0.
Georgia 49, Auburn 13.
Tulane 36, Clemson 20.I
Duke 34, South Carolina 7.
North Carolina State 39, Rich-
mond U. 0.
MIDWEST
Great Lakes 32, Marquette 0.
Notre Dame 21, Northwestern 0.
Ohio State 26, Illinois 12..
Indiana 47, Pittsburgh 0.
Michigan 14, Wisconsin 0.
Minnesota 46, Iowa 0.
Iowa State 9, Drake 0.
Iowa Pre-Flight 51, Missouri 7.
SOUTHWEST
Texas Christian 7, Texas 7.
Randolph Field 54, Southwestern
(Tex.) 0.
Southern Methodist 20, Arkan-
sas 12.

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SNOV. 27, 8:30 P.M.
Other
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Carroll Glenn . . . Dec. 5
Boston Symphony . Dec. 11,
Vladimir Horowitz . Jan. 15
Dorothy Maynor . . . Feb. 3
Westminster Choir . Feb. 11
Chicago Symphony Mar. 19

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