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November 19, 1944 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Anne Wiggin To.
Open WSSF
Campus Drive
Students Abroad To Be
Benefitted by Fund
The address of l4iss Anne Wiggin,
traveling secretary for the War Stu-
dent Service Fund, at 7:30 Tuesday
in the Michigan League, will offi-
cially start the WSSF drive on
camipus.~
WSSF is the organization through
which students help other students
in Europe, China and the United
States whose education has been
disrupted by the war. Food, medical
care, clothing, books and study ma-
terials bought with student contribu-
tions will enable men in prison camps
throughout the world to get univer-
sity training, in some cases with
credit.
Miss Wiggin's aid in setting up the
Ann Arbor branch of the WSSF will
be especially valuable because of her
wide knowledge and experience in
student relief work. Twelve years
:with the National Board of the
Y.W.C.A. in work for students in 75
foreign countries in American col-
leges and universities preceded her
position as Executive -Secretary of
the International Student Commit-
tee of the Y.W.C.A., which she devel-
oped as an independent organization.
At the outbreak of the present war
Miss Wiggin immediately joined the
American Committee for Christian
Refugees, whose plight she knew
from first-hand observation.

NEWMAN CLUB DRIVE:
Catholic Student Organization
Opens Membership Campaign

Planning many new activities for
this year, the re-organized Newman
Club at St. Mary's Student Chapel is
opening a drive today for new mem-
bers.
Setting as its goal the enrollment
of every Catholic student on campus,
then Club hopes to exceed its total
membership of last year, Doris Heid-
gen, membership chairman of the
club announced today.
Activities are of both a religious
and social nature, including parties,
dances and discussion groups. The
most recent party was held last Fri-
day; night in the clubrooms of the
chapel with more than 200 attending.
Plans will also be made to organize
club bowling teams.
As a member of a nation-wide or-
ganization, the Michigan chapter of
the Newman Club will mark its
eighth,year on the campus. Club
advisor is Father Frank McPhillips,
student chaplain at St. Mary's.
Blakeman To Lead Class
"Understanding Ourselves' 'is the
subject for study and discussion of
the student class held at 9:30 a. m.
today and every Sunday in the Wes-
leyan Lounge of the First Methodist
Church.
Led by Dr. Edward W. Blakeman,
University religious counselor, the
gioup deals with problems of reli-
gion and personality of youth, and
the study of ax application of the
basic aims of the Christian theory of
life to the'self and groups.

All students interested may attend.
The course is planned so that Lead-
ership Training credit is available for
those who may do church school
teaching.
S* *
Other Guild Programs..
Talks by- members of the Univer-
sity faculty and students will form
the programs for many of the church
guilds that are meeting today.
Prof. George E. Carrothers, direc-
tor of the Bureau of Cooperation
with Educational Institutions, will
speak to members of the Wesleyan
Guild at 5 p.m. in the Methodist
Church. His topic will be "Becoming
a Christian and Staying That Way."
Supper and fellowship hour will,
follow.
Dean Erich Walters will be the
speaker on the Canterbury Club
program at 6 p.m. today at the
Student Center of St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church. The meeting
wi1 be preceded by the Choral
Evening Prayer and an address by
Rev. Shrady Hill at 5 p.m.
"Certainty in a World of Uncer-
tainty" will be discussed by Prof.'
Howard McCluskey of the education
school at the Congregational-Disci-
ples Guild at 5 p.m. today in the
Congregational Church. Devotional
service will be held -by A/S Hugh
Krim. A cost supper will be served
before the program.
Next speaker on the Westminster
Guild series is Dr. W. Carl Rufus of
the astronomy department who will
talk on "What I Believe-About the
Universe." The Presbyterian Church:
group will have supper afterwards.
Lutheran Supper
Lutheran"Student Association will
meet at 5:30 p.m. for fellowship hour
with supper and a program following.
Edith Olsen is in charge of the
Thanksgiving program.
The University Lutheran Chapel
will hold its student class atC10:15
a.m., service at 11 a.m. and supper
meeting of Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club at 5 p.m.
Roger Williams Guild will meet at.
5 p.m. today at the Guild House to
hear a talk on labor problems. Supper
and fellowship will follow.
Board Recommends
Social' Security Extension
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18.- (IP)-
The Social Security Board recom-
mended today the extension of un-
employment insurance to employes
in establishments having as few as
one employe.
The board also recommended leng-
thening benefits to 26 weeks, and an
increase to $25 in maximum weekly
benefits.

'Ike' May Act
Quickly To Keep
Belgian Order
Diplomatic Interest Is
Aroused by Red Groups
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18.---Author-
ities here believe that General
Dwight D. Eisenhower will act with
speed and power to maintain order
in Belgium if threatening political
disputes produce open violence.
The General's first responsibility
as Allied commander-in-chief is to
prevent any kind of outbreak from
interfering with the storming of Ger-
many's inner fortress. He has plenty
of authority under agreements with
the Belgian government, though nat-
urally he would prefer not to divert
forces from the main job.
While the direct war aspects of
the Belgian trouble command firstI
attention here, there is intense dip-
lomatic interest also in the power
and purpose of Communist groups
there and in France as well.
It is considered possible that the
experiences of liberated Belgium and
France may furnish unmistakeable
evidence of the extent to which
western European communists are
playing a Moscow policy line, and
also some indications of Russian pol-
icy toward the countries of western
Europe.
The question has come into focus
in Belgium over a government order
to the resistance "White Army" to
surrender its arms.
Two Communist cabinet members
and a representative of the resistance
movement in the cabinet resigned
over the issue,
Sen. Ferguson
Addresses FPA
NEW YORK, Nov. 18.-(.P)-Sen.
Ferguson (Rep., Mich.) today urged
that Congress give authority to "the
President, as commander in chief, to
use our armed forces at any future
date at his own discretion."
Ferguson, who spoke along with
Sen. Burton (Rep., 0.) at a Foreign
Policy Association meeting, said also
he knew of "no isolationist bloc in
the Senate."
"I think that was brought out last
November in the vote on the so-called
Connally resolution. I pray and hope
there never will be a bloc on either
side, of that kind," he said.
Discussing United States partici-
pation in a world organization, Bur-
ton recommended that Congress en-
act "a statute enabling us to make
full use of this new instrument o
peace" by conferring authority or
the American delegate to act quickly
in emergencies.

Hillel-Avukah
News Briefs
Council Meeting . .
A special meeting of the Hillel
Student council will be held at 10:45
a. m. today at the Foundation. Stan
Wallace, president, will report to the
group on the currenit membership
drive.
Avukah Ten. ..
A tea and social gathering, spon-
sored by Avukah, studont Zionist
organization on eapsi, will be
held from > to 5 p. in.toy at the
Hillel Foundation.
Refreshments of tea, candy and
sandwiches will be served at the
gathering which will be briefly ad-
dressed by Dr. Max Dresden, fac-
ulty adviser to Avuka.I

SANTA COMES EARLY:
'Nubb ins' Hof
Celebrate Chri
By The Associated Press
CHEYENNIE, WYO., NOV. 18-
This is Christmas eve for Nubbins
Hoffman 3.
His father, Marshall, trimmed a
tree tonight so it will be ready when
Nubbins, whose real name is Forest,
awakens tomorrow morning.
Santa Claus is coming early for
Nubbins because he may not be
around the house when Saint Nick
pays his call next month. The boy is
sufering from a bladder ailment
which his parents fear will cause his
death before Christmas day, so for
Nubbins, tomorrow is Christmas.
It will be a bright Christmas for
Nt bboins if not a white one. The
weatherman's forecast called for
fair weather tonight and Sunday,
with no snow.
The lack of snow won't matter too
much to the boy. What he wants
most is s big and brightly ornament-
ed tree.'
The tree-trimming took place in
the kitchen and when Nubbins awak-
ens in his crib in the living room to-
morrow morning, the tree will be
r.ear the crib.
Under it will be piles of gifts from
sympathetic folks all over the nation.
"If he lived 99 years he would
have a new toy to play with every
day," said the grateful father,
overwhelmed by the kindness of
Eisenhower Is Honored
BRUSSELS, Belgium, Nov. 18.-
n01)-Avenue des Hortensais, one of
- the Belgian capital's most important
thoroughfares, will be renamed Ave-
; nue D. Eisenhower, it was announced
I today.

F man Will
stmas Today

t

Hostesses at the tea
everyone is invited will
Savin, Judy Jacobs and
kin. Benson Jaffee and
kin will serve as hosts.

to which
be Sylvia
Zena Et-
Roy Plot-

persons who sent gifts from as far
away as New York and Florida.
Gifts include a candy-filled toy
airplane, locomotive, fire engine, bat-
tleship, jeep, building logs, and a
wooden freight train. Soldiers in the
convalescent training program at
Lowry Field, Denver, stepped up pro-
duction of wooden toys they were
making for children of soldiers and
others. A small plane, on a routine
training flight to Cheyenne, delivered
the soldiers' gifts.
Nbins' "dream Christmas" will
be topped off by a dinner furnished
by the Union Pacific Railroad of
which his -father is an employe.
Is Apprehended
GRAND RAPIDS, Nov. 18:.--P()-
Driving through a red traffic light
here Friday night had more serious
results for John William Major, 26,
of Ann Arbor, than a traffic viola-
-",ion.
Questioned and checked by the
police, it was disclosed Major had
'no driver's license, did not own the
car, had no draft card, carried no
means of identification, and later
admitted he had escaped from a
prison stockade at Camp MacKall,
N.C., three weeks ago, having prev-
iously deserted as a soldier from Fort
Bragg, N.C. Major told the police
he had been caught burglarizing a
store at Beckley, W.Va., after escap-
ing from Fort Bragg and an Army
sentence had confined him to Camp
MacKall. He is now in custody of
federal authorities.

Y

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

HELP WANTED
GIRLS OR BOYS for several after-
noons to rake leaves. Call 7880.
WANTED: Woman pianist for two
American country dance classes.
Telephone 4121, Extension 391.
WANTED-WOMEN TO WORK AS
NURSES' AIDES AND AS HELP-
ERS IN DIET KITCHENS. FULL
OR PART TIME. APPLY PER-
SONNEL OFFICE, UNIVERSITY
HOSPITAL.
WANTED-MEN TO DO ORDERLY
WORK AT UNIVERSITY HOSPI-
TAL-FULL OR PART TIME. AP-
PLY AT PERSONNEL OFFICE.
WANTED-Boy to work in kitchen
in return for board. Contact cook
or manager 1015 E. Huron St.
Phone 23179.

LOST AND FOUNDI
LOST: White Waterman pen Wed-
nesday. Finder please call Shirley
Unger 7595.
LOST: Fountain pen. Green Parker1
vacumatic. Please return to
Daily office. Reward.
LOST: Dark glasses, precriptionj
ground, harlequin shape. Mon-
day on Huron St. Reward. Lois
Hill 6737.
LOST November 17, lady's rose gold
watch with safety chain. Reward.
Call Elaine Katleman, 23119.
CHEMISTRY library book lost-"The
Structure of Crystals" by Wyckoff.
Please call 5974.
BUY WAER BONVDS

Language C f(sses
Classes in Hebrew and Yiddish,
taught by Irving Panush, will be
given free of charge at the Hillel
Foundation this semester.
A class in beginning Hebrew,
stressing writing, reading and con-
versation is scheduled at 8 p. m.
Mondays and Wednesdays.
Advanced Hebrew conversation.
and literature will be taught at
4:30 p. m. Wednesdays.
Classes in Yiddish for beginners
and more advanced students will
be taught at 4 p. m., Thursdays.
Students wishing information on
classes are requested to see Mr. Pan-
ush or Judy Jacobs at any of the
class meetings.
Study Group . .
Sylvan Berman will speak on the
situation of world Jewry at the fal
semester's first meeting of the Hillel
Avukah study group, 8 p. ., Tues
day, at the Hillel Foundation.
Flag That Inspired Key
Is Now at Smithsonian
WASHINGTON, Nov. 18.- UP)-
The original Star Spangled Banner
stored in secrecy away from Wash
ington for many months as a war
time precaution, is again on view a
the Smithsonian Institution.
The banner which flew over For
McHenry, Baltimore, in 1314 an
inspired Francis Scott Key to writ
the National Anthem, was one o
many historical objects which ha
been moved to safer places soon afte
the war broke out.
Nazi Ace Killed
LONDON, Nov. 18.-(/P)-The Ger
man radio said tonight that L
Anton Haffner, Nazi ace who wa
credited with 204 air victories, ha
been killed in action.

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