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October 30, 1944 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-10-30

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30, 1944

TIIE MICHIGAN DAILY

. .. . .... ...... . .. . ........... ............. . . .. . . .. ....... . .. ........... . . ..... . ......... ... ...... ...... . - - .......... . .. ----------- - - .

TRADITION ON CAMPUS:
Varsity Men's Clee Club Is
Planning Full Year's Program:

ANOTHER CASUALTY:
CampIs H mor Mag"azine
Dies; Lectures Will Profit
4>1__________________________

One campus group whose position
in Michigan tradition is undisputed
is the Varsity Men's Glee Club, and
according to present indications,
plans to organize this fall and con-
tinue its long history;
Headed by Professor David Mat-
tern of the School of Music the Glee
Cluh is composed entirely of men
and as Prof. Mattern put it-"It
hasn't been easy maintaining a full
membership, but we have managed."
In the last couple of years, the
personnel has been divided between
civilian and Navy men on campus
and Prof. Mattern indicated that
notices -of, tryout meeting will be
posted.
The Glee Club long has been an
established feature of campus life,
participating in smokers, outdoor
concerts on the library steps, and
entertaining for alumni groups.
Before the war, this group en-
joyed a national reputation envied
by most, but duplicated by very fewl
as one of the outstanding organiza-
tions of its kind in the nation. They
made frequent trips to the East sand

around the Middle West, appearing
before alumni groups.
These travel activities have been
suspended for the duration but the
campus programn will be continued.
The past summer saw the campus
program in full swing including a
major production in the front of the
Library and appearances before cam-
pus groups.
Persons interested in joining the
Glee Club are asked to watch The
Daily this week for announcement of1
tryout meeting.
Nine Air Shows
Added This Fall
Nine radio programs begun as
experiments this summer by the
University Broadcasting Service will
be added to the regular schedule this
fall. These programs are carried by
WJR Detroit and WKAR, Lansing
and all originate on campus in
Morris Hall.

--Photo by John Horeth t
TOP OFFICERS OF NEW POST-Secn aove are Commander Len
Cavanaugh (left) and Vice-Commander Laszlo Hetenyi of the new
American Legion George H. Cannon Post. The post was formed here in
early October and will aid veterans enrolling in the University.
With its membership growing as new veterans arrive on campus, the
new George H. Cannon Post of the American Legion is fast becoming an
integral part of the campus and community life.
Comm. Cavanaugh, reputed to be the youngest American Legion com-
mander in the nation at 21, predicted that Legion activities would get into
full swing after the term begins.
"We are going to conduct a recruiting program among the new veterans
who will be enrolling," he said, "and we expect to increase the scope of our
activities."

By EVELYN PHILLIPS
Chant the funeral dirge. Hang out
the lack crepe. The Gargoyle, long
may it live, is dead.
No longer will its subtle quips and
not-so-subtle quips liven the dead-
ened atmosphere of that oh-so-bor-
ing lecture. No longer will the glam-
our gals see themselves as others see
them in the Garg Album of Beauty.
No longer will gravel-voiced high-
pressure salesmen sing the praises
of that famous humor magazine, ex-
changing campus cut-up numbers
for a paltry sum of silver.
There have~been many war cas-
ualties around campus. There is
less coffee, less sugar, less tea, less
hot-fudge sundaes, less room, and
in fact, less everything is the order
of the day. But before we could
always laugh, sometimes sneering-
ly, for it must be admitted that at
times The Gargoyle hit a new high
in campus scorn. And now, we.
don't even have The Gargoyle to
drive us to fits of mad laughter.
Remember the deluge of modern
short stories with which we whiled
away the time in the library. There
was the heartbreaker entitled "Ram-

sey's Regression," whose passionate
wolfish heart was laid bare by the
lucid pen of Orson Patterson.
And, darling, do you remember
those laughable, lovable sketches
by the same name, "Darling, Do
You Remember?" And Wormsley,
the candid critic of music matter,
who gave us "As You Like It," and
we read it whether we liked it or
not, has gone into hiding until the
war is over and he can once more
trot out his precious music master-
pieces.
And the pictures!!! My dear, do
you remember how The Garg traips-
ed right along to the upper regions
with Mary Borman's boys and gave
us front line pictures of dapper Mich-
igan men (with one hand not in
right pocket and one pipe not be-
tween upper and lower plate) slaving
like true sons of the soil to save the
beet crop. And no college humor
magazine could compare with The
Gargoyle when it came to acquiring
those 12:30 a.m. pictures.
The Gargoyle, typical represen-
tation of Michigan humor or un-
reasonable facsimile thereof (with
3 box tops and 20 cents) has died,

New Machine
Is GiveV, toU
Refrigeration Plant
To Be Set Up Here
An absorption refrigeration mach-
ine capable of turning out two tons
of ice per day has been donated to
the University by the Hoover Com-
pany of North Canton, Ohio and was
set up in thd chemical and metal-
lurgical department laboratory for
lab and experimental work, J. L.
York, of the Chemical Engineering
department said recently.
Occupying 144 square feet of floor
space, the machine has been run for
100 hours by the Hoover Company,
Mr. York said.
Operating continuously, the ma-
chine -will be used for student edu-
cation in the theory and practice of
refrigeration, according to Mr. York.
but its spirit lives on. Just listen
to any senior's joke, any profes-
sor's ha-ha line and you may know
that The Gargoyle has not lived
in vain. And when the time comes
that wartime pressure and incon-
veniences are removed, let it be
known that a most substantial
ghost of The Gargoyle will once
again return to haunt the Uni-
versity campus.

_

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