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November 16, 1944 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TRMSDAY, NOV. 16, 19-

_________________________________________________________________________________________________ I
_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prof. Waterman
:Is New Head of
VU War Course
Contract Settlement
Is Main Subject Taught
Prof. M. H. Waterman, Secretary
of the School of Business Adminis-
tration, has succeeded Prof. Robert
L. Dixon in directorship of the Uni-
versity's War Contract Termination
course in Detroit, which is being
taught at the request of the Army
and Navy, it was learned yesterday.
The War and Navy Departments
issued on Nov. 1 the Joint Termina-
tion Regulation, according to which
the course is being taught. "In
importance to the economic welfare
of the nation, the settlement of ter-
minated war contracts is second only
to war procurement. To avoid serious
injury to our economy, three things
are essential: 1. Termination claims
must be settled fairly and quickly;
2. Termination inventory must be
promptly cleared from war plants;
3. Adequate interim financing must
be provided for war contractors pend-
ing settlement," the report states.
Employees of war contractors who
hold responsible positions in connec-
tion with termination work, public
accountants, and lawyers, especially
applicants recommended by govern-
ment contracting agencies, are
taught in this two-hour, three day
course how best to settle terminated
war contracts. Settling Fixed Price
and Cost Plus Fixed Fee contracts,
preparing claims, interim financing
and removing surplus properties are
the subjects stressed.
Prof, Waterman and Prof. E. H.
Gault of the SchoolofdBusiness Ad-
ministration, Prof. J. W. Ruswinckel,
of Michigan State College and mem-
bers of various branches of the
armed services compose the faculty.
Interviewing
Ends Today
The last opportunity for junior
women to be interviewed for the 15
positions available as captains of
Bond Belle teams will be from 3 to
5 p.m. today in the Undergraduate
office of the League.
Each Bond Belle team will handle
the bond sales to the faculty and
administrative members of a par-
ticular school. The captain will be
responsible for the progress of her
team and will try to capture the
prize offered to the team with the
greatest number of sales.
Petitions, which are obtainable in
the Undergraduate office, should be
filled out and brought to the inter-
view. Suggested methods of organiz-
ing and promoting sales will be the
basis upon which the captains will be
selected. The results of the petition-
ing will be announced tomorrow by
Fran Goldberg, special events chair-
man of JGP.

All Orientation
Groups To Hold
Three Meetings
Gatherings Must Be
During Next Six Weeks
Each orientation adviser is sched-
uled to have three meetings with her
group within the next six weeks, the
time and the place of two of the
meetings being left up to each
adviser.s
At one of the meetings Dean Lloyd
will serve coffee in the Grand Rapids
room of the League for the freshman
groups only, and definite hours from
4:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Fridays have been assigned to each
group. If these coffee hours are
successful, the groups of transfer
students will go at a later date.
The second meeting will be held
for the purpose of explaining study
habits, to help the new students with
any problems, and to answer their
questions.
War activities set.up by the League
and Pan-Hellenic Association will be
explained in the third meeting.
Advisers are requested to turn in
a report on each meeting. They
should include in this report their
activities, who took part, and wheth-
er or not the meeting was worth-
while.
Dr. Dresden To
Address Group
Physics Instructor Will
Speak Before Avukah
Dr. Max Dresden of the Physics de-
partment will address the annual
freshman-sophomore tea of Avukah,
student Zionist organization, which
will be held from 3 to 5 p. m. Sun-
day at the Hillel Foundation. Dr.
Dresden will speak on Zionism for
the American Jew.
Officers of the Avukah organiza-
tion are Benson Jaffee, '46, presi-
dent; Sylvia Savin, '45, vice-presi-
dent; Judy Jacobs, '47, secretary;
Zena Etkin, '46, social chairman.
All students, servicemen and
townspeople interested in the organ-
ization are invited to attend the
meeting.
V U'Graduate
Receives Post
Dr. C. Nils Tavares, graduate of
the law school in the class of '25 and
admitted to the Hawaii bar in the
same year, was appointed Assistant
Attorney General of the Territory of
Hawaii, it was announced recently.
-In his undergraduate days Tavares
and his Tang-Tavares instrumental
quartet were in demand for every
party. Dr. Tavares was in the Var-
sity Glee Club with Gov. Thomas E.
Dewey and worked on the Law
Review.
After Pearl Harbor, Tavares was
appointed Special Deputy Attorney
General of the Territory -of Hawaii
in connection with emergency mat-
ters, until November, 1942, when, at
the request of the government, he
resigned.
International Center To
Hold Student Tea Today
Foreign students and their Ameri-
can friends are invited to a tea to be
held from 4 to 5:30 p.m. today in the
International Center.
The Center will hold the first of its
regular Friday tea dances from 4 to
6 p.m. tomorrow.

Relief Seen for Future
WASHINGTON, NOV. 1-(/P)-The
government moved today to make
more cigarettes available in the fu-
ture by increasing 1945 production
quotas of cigarette tobacco.
INVEST IN VICTORY
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

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Chinese Leader
Will Lecture to
Campus Groups
A former member of the Kuomin-
tang party in China, Dr. Timgthy T.
Lew, will be on the campus Dec. 9 to
14 to confer with the leaders who
took part in the China Conference
last summer.
Dr. Lew is also a member of the
Yen Ching University and is at pres-
ent a representative of the China
Relief Association in New York City.
While in Ann Arbor, he will be the
guest of the Chinese Christian Asso-
ciation and Dr. Edward W. Blake-
man, University religious counselor.
Under a program planned by
Shing-Chih Tien, instructor in Chi-
nese, Dr. Lew will lecture to the
Chinese students, Baptist Guild and
other organizations. His topic will be
"Present Day Education in China."
Percy Jones Thanks U,
Army for Hospitality
A note of appreciation was recently
received by the University and Army
headquarters thanking them for ac-
commodating, each football game
week-end, approximately 70 service-
men brought here from the Percy
Jones General and Convalescent
Hospital, Battle Creek.

~Women's News~
Volleyball Tournament
Adelia Cheever will-play Alpha Chi
Omega at 5:15 p.m. today in Barbour
Gym 'for the opening game of the
WAA Volleyball Tournament, accord-
ing to Barbara Osborne, '46, Inter-
house Manager.
At the same time. Mosher 4 will
play Betsy Barbour, also in Barbour
Gym. At 7:30 p.m. today, Kappa
Delta will oppose Zeta Tau Alpha.
It is requested that the players be
on time.
.DomWar Stamps
Drmitory representatives are
asked to pick up their stamps from
3 p.m. to 5 p.m. today in Miss
McCormick's office in the League,
according to Claire Macaulay, JGP
dormitory chairman.
Merit Committee ..
Coeds interested in working on the
Merit committee are reminded to
attend the meeting which will be
held at 4:30 p.m. today in the Under-
graduate office of the League, ac-
cording to Joan Pullam, '45, chair-
man of the committee.

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YANK PT BOATS PICK UP JAP SURVIVORS OF PHILIPPINES FIGHT-Japanese survivors from
enemy ships sunk by American naval craft in the Surigao Strait during the Second Battle of the Philip-
pine Sea, are picked up by crews of Yank PT boats. Japs are clinging to debris. Note ready guns held
by some of Yanks.

SYNTHETIC VS. NATURAL:
Conflict Seen Between British-
Dutch and U.S. Rubber Interests

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

't

By SIGRID ARNE
Associated Press Correspondent
WASHINGTON, NOV. 11 - Just
us garden-variety American tax-
payers put out $700,000,000 the past
three years to set up a synthetic rub-]
ber industry.
What's to become of the $700,000,-
000 investment once Japan is brush-
ed out of our old rubber sources in
Malaya and the Dutch East Indies?
Will we pay njore or less for tires,
hot water bottles, girdles, garters,
washers, insulation-which add up
into the millions each year for the
nation?
Just Rubber
Will we ever depend on the Indies
again, no matter what, it costs us,
as a sort of insurance, to keep the
home synthetic rubber industry go-
ing?
These questions are just about
rubber. But behind them lies the
much bigger answer to whether we
step towards that brave new world
of economic health sketched in the
Atlantic Charter and all the United
Nations conferences.
Why? Because against our $700,-
000,000 investment in synthetic, the
English and the Dutch have over a
billion - and - a - half investment in
natural rubber in the Far East.
That's both on plantations and in
native holdings. (Natives are the
little fellows, like our little dairy
farmers.) Close to 2,000,000 persons
get their living from Far East rubber,1
to say nothing of those at home who4
get income from rubber stock.
More Rubber Than Before War
Come the war's end, the world will
have more rubber than it used before
the war.
Our synthetic rubber is now pro-

duced at the rate of 836,000 tons a
year. The Indies '39 production was
971,000 tons.
In 1939 the whole world used 1,-
001,000 tons, but if you add up what
everyone (including Latin America,
Africa etc.) can produce, you've got
a total of 2,750,000 tons, against a
calculated post-war demand of 1,-
600,000 tons-about 70 per cent less
than the rubber available. These
figures come from Stanford Univer-
sity's rubber expert, K. E. Knorr, who
is getting much attention here.
We, who produce synthetic, and
U. K. and the Netherlands, who sell
natural rubber, could fight it out like
bull-headed farmers with too many
tomatoes. One of us would have
tomatoes left to throw away.
Knew Too Little for Agreement
But this is the eventuality which
United Nations leaders hope to avoid
in several fields: aviation, shipping
and rubber.
This has been done so far about
rubber: U. K., the U.S. and the Neth-
erlands sent experts to London last
August. They found none of them
know enough to write an agreement.
So they went home to study, to meet
again informally when the delegates
know more.
This much was obvious at London
(you can't get anyone to quote, be-
cause they're all afraid of people who
have investments in either kind of
rubber):
U. K. 'and the Netherlands are
frightened of our synthetic rubber
industry. Our industrialscientists
have proved wizards before, and
have proved wizards before, and they
may bring synthetic prices down be-
low natural rubber, and make the
product just as elastic-say, in ten
io 20 years.

(Continued from Page 2)
piano by Carl Lamson, and will pre-
sent the following program: Beetho-
ven's Sonata in A major; Concerto
No. 3 by Mozart; Rondo Brilliante,
Schubert; Hungarian Rondo, Haydn-
Kreisler; La Zambra, Arbos; and
deFalla's La Jota.
Tickets may be purchased at the
offices of the University Musical
Society in Burton Memorial Tower
daily until 5 p.m., and at the Hill
Auditorium box office beginning at
7 p.m., on the evening of the concert.
Events Toda
Department of Chemical and Met-
allurgical Engineering: At the regu-
lar Seminar meeting at 4 p.m. in
Rm. 3201 of the East Engineering
Building, Mr. C. M. Sliepcevich will
speak on the subject "Negative Ap-
parent Volumes of Condensates in
High Pressure Gases." All interested
persons are cordially invited to
attend.
Veterans' Organization: The next
meeting originally scheduled for 7
p.m. on Wednesday, has been post-
poned to 7 p.m. Thursday (Nov. 16).
All members of the organization and
all veterans interested in participat-
ing in its work are urged to attend.
Concert Band: The University
Concert Band will rehearse at four
thirty o'clock today.
The Stump Speakers' Society of
Sigma Rho Tau will hold its regular
weekly meeting tonight. Business will
start at 7:30 in the Union. The
important matter of committee ap-
pointments will be taken up, as well
as plans for the National Convention.
Arrangements for the future round-
table on Jet-Propulsion will also be
made public.
All interested engineers and archi-
tects are invited to attend.
The Regular Thursday Evening
Record Concert held in the Men's
Lounge of the Graduate School at
7:45 p.m. will feature the Rachman-
inoff Concerto No. 2 for Piano,

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Film of U' War
Effort to Be Shown

"Michigan Men on the March," a
film depicting the University's con-
tribution to the war effort, will be
shown next Monday at the Univer-
sity of Michigan Club of Chicago,
Dr. T. Hawley Tapping, General Sec-
retary of the Alumni Association,
announced yesterday. The film was
also shown Tuesday night at the
annual fall meeting of the University
of Michigan Club of Ferndale at
Ferndale High School.

Itichiigait Itthat 1War

For the Marine,
Soldier, Sailor
Our hair styles are blended
and shaped to your individual
needs and personality.
Do you need a hair cut to-
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THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Between Michigan & State Theaters

Editor's Note: Contributions to this col-
umn should he addressed to The Military
Desk, The Michigan Daily, Student Pub-
lications Building.
Flying a potent Mustang fighter
plane escorting U. S. bombers over
Germany is the war role of Lt.
WARNER C. JENNINGS, student at
the University for two years prior to
entering the AAF in February, 1943.
Lt. WENDELL D. TRUDGEN,
who left the University in Febru-
ary, 1943, is now stationed at a
Lincoln, Neb. Army Air Field.
Immediately after leaving the
University, Lt. Trudgen received
training at Denison U. and Sey-
mour Johnson Field. This October,
Lt. Trudgen graduated the AAF
'Training Command school at Yale
UI.
Lt. ALFRED W. COXON III, son
of Dr. A. William Coxon, surgeon at
the University Health Service, receiv-
ed his commission as a flight officer
in ceremonies held last month at
Boca Raton, Fla., Army Air Field.
Lt. Coxon is a graduate of the Uni-
versity engineering school.

(Italy), has been awarded the fourth Franck's Symphony in D
oak leaf cluster to the Air Medal the Concertstuch by C.
"for meritorious achievement in aer- Graduates and servicem
o mdially invited.
ial flight while participating in sus _
tained operational activities against
the enemy."I

Minor, and
M. Weber.
en are cor-

First Lt. CHARLES W. LADOW, a
former student at the University and
now a pilot with the 15th Air Force

Lt. Col. JOHN H. MARSHALL, who
has served 31 months as a hospital
commander in the South Pacific
theater of operations and was award-
ed the Presidential Unit Citation, has
returned from service overseas and is
now being processed through the
Army Ground and Service Redistri-
bution Station, Miami Beach, Fla.,
where his next assignment will b d-
termined.

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LAST DAY!

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SUITS, sizes 9--15............20% Off
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CHORAL UNION SERIES
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LANZ DRESSES,

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Naty dice bombers-about to strike! In each rear cock-
pit rides a radio gunner - trusted protector of his pilot
-and plane. His skill with radio and detection devices
permits his pilot to concentrate on flying the plane and
blasting the objective. His marksmanship makes enemy
planes scarcer, brings V-Day nearer.
Until that day comes, Western Electric's major job
will be making huge quantities of radio and detection
devices. As our forces strike farther and farther into the
vast areas of the Pacific,these electronic weapons become
more important than ever. At Western Electric, many
college graduates - both men and women - are helping

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WHITE SLIPS, sizes 38-44...... 20% Off

November 17

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