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March 12, 1945 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 1

, . 10 .9 1.

WHY WINDOWS ARE DIRTY:
Shortage of Help Makes It Impossible,
For Janitors To Keep uildins Clean

By RUTH GERBER
"If you think the windows in Ai who can't be used to wash the out-
fiside of the windows.
gell Hall are dirty now," Edward S.

for the nurse-draft bill. Warren, chief custodian of the De-
"There is not anyone in this cham- partment of Buildings and Grounds,
ber who is not ready and willing at said, in talking about the help short-
all times to provide everything neces- ag, "nutain tthehsprsu-
nary for the protection, the health age, just wait until the spring sun
and the care of the men in the arm- hits them!"
ed services of our nation," Dondero In summing up the whole situa-
told the House, adding that he voted tion lie said, "We simply do not
for the nurse-draft "reluctantly-be- have enough men." Warren ex-
cause there was no necessity for it." plained that before the war a staff
" Like the recent work-or-jail bill, of 130 to 140 janitors were employ-
the nurse draft substitutes force for ed, while now there are only 85.
freedom, Dondero contended. These are all older men, moreover,
GIVE YOUR ROM
THAT EXTRATOUCH
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SCARF AND A GAY RUG
We also have durable shoe bags and
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Although some women are em-
ployed, they can not do much of the
necessary work, and the younger men
are all in the armed services or in
war work. Elizabeth Smith of the
Student Employment Service said she
hadn't received a single applicationI
for such work this year.

be done when classrooms are un-
occupied, but the school day hasn't
been shortened, either. On the
whole this will be the third year
that the windows haven't been
washed. It takes one man 28 days
to thoroughly clean the Museum.',
He wouldn't even venture a guess
at the time it would take to do
Angell Hall.

Osborne Asks
Tirade Against
Athletes Stop
Ball Players Provide N
Necessary Recreation
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, March 10-Livingston
E. Osborne, Illinois Conservation Di-
rector, declared tonight that "certainr
publicity hungry Washington bureau-
crats" were "hunting out baseball
and football players for induction in
the armed forces as though they were
criminals and slackers."
Stop iTirade
In a prepared speech at the De-
troit Sportsmen's Congress, Osborne
declared "this tirade which is being
Carried on against American sports
by these publicity hounds must be
stopped or American sports will be
removed from the high pinnacle
which it now occupies in the minds
of the youth of our nation."
"Sporting events are one of the

Hillel Offers Language Classes
Classes in Hebrew and Yiddish,-
with both elementary and advanced i m philosophy, will conduct both
instruction, are being offered by the courses. Those interested should
Hillel Foundation this semester. phone the Foundation at 2-6585.
Yiddish class begins Tuesday. and
will be held every week thereafter SApplicant'sPun
fro 7 to 9 pom. Instructon in He-
brew will be offered from 7 to 9 p.m. Leads but to the 'Grave'
on Wednesdays starting this week.
Irving Panush, graduate student Reported in the JAG School we~ek-
ly, The Advocate, recently was the
story of an applicant to OCS at
Camp Blanding, Fla., who gave as
BUY WAR BONDS his qualification: "My three years of
experience as funeral director qualify
me to handle grave responsibilities."

I

i

I

At times, Mr. Warren continued,
students have volunteered, but they'
could rarely work when they were
needed. The janitors accomplish the
majority of their chores from 6:30
a. mn. until classes begin, and from
12 to 1 p. m. when students are un-
willing to work. "Student help," he!
said, "is not steady." Another fault
of student help, Edward Pardon, sup-i
erintendent of Buildings and Grounds,
said, is' that students want to do
things on a grand scale, getting ev-
erything done in one day. "We justj
don't have enough equipment to doj
things like that," he added. "For in-
stance, last spring, when the fresh-
men women cleaned the campus, they
recruited 150 co-eds to work one day.
That was fine. But after the leaves
have been raked something must be
done with them. We didn't have eith-
er the trucks or the men to keep up
with the workers."
"Time, too, is a large factor. In
normal times the windows were
washed three times a year during
vacations, but there are no longer
any vacations. The work must

'"The students," Mr. Pardon said,
"don't have the feeling that part of
the University belongs to them. Aft-
er a vigorous campaign last spring to
keep students off the grass, some men
were found playing baseball on the
Raekham Memorial lawn. The same
attitude has been manifested during
the recent brown-out campaign to
save fuel. Although professors and
students have been asked to co-oper-
ate, students have been discovered

S*~(*

I

I

using empty classrooms as private greatest forms of recreation Ameri-
study halls. We simply haven't can workers have," Osborne said.
enough men to police the whole cam- "They should be classified as essen-
pus and still do any work." tial for this reason alone.
DAILY FFICIAL BULLETIN

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) Give
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atre, when Ava Comin Case will play
compositions by Bach, Chopin, De-
bussy, Respighi, and Rachmaninoff.
Open to the public.
Benjamnin Owen, pianst. wviii p'e-
sent a recital in partial fulfillment of
the requirements for the degree of
Master of Music at 8:30 p.m, Wed-
nesday, March 14, in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater. A pupil of Joseph
Brinkman, Mr. Owen will play com-
positions by Bach. Mozart, Beet-
hoven, Ravel and Franck.
The public is cordially ivited.
Events Tida
The Lutheran Student Association
will meet this afternoon at 5 in
Zion Lutheran Parish Hall. Miss
Gertrude Fiegel, a former ILSAer and
now teaching in Plymouthi, Mich.,
will be the speaker. Following the
program supper will be served at 6.
Sunday morning worship services at
10:30 in Zion and Trinity Lutheran
Churches.
The service for the World's Stu-
dent Christian Federation Day of
Prayer for Students will be held this
evening at 7:30. in it. Andrew's
Church. It is sponsored by the Can-
terbury Club. It is cpen to all in-
terested.
The International Center program
this evening at 7:30 will be a recep-
tion for new foreign students. Fac-
ulty and American friends are cor-
dially invited to attend.
Congregatonail-Disciples Guild, 5
p.m., at the First Congregational
Church, State and William streets.
Following the supper, a student panel
will discuss "Cooperative Religion."
The closing Worship Service will be
lead by RoseMarion Simonton.
Co ning KI vents
Monday Evening Drama Section,
Faculty Women's Club. Monday,
March 12, 7:45 p.m., library Unitar-
ian Church.
All School of faculty Xyem-
bers and students .a'e cordially in-
vited by t he School of Music Student
Council to an informal party to be

held at 8 p.m., Monday, March 12,
in the Michigan League.
Regiment X U.S.O.: There will be
a compusory meeting at the USO
Tuesday, March 13, at 7:30 p.m.
Polonia Society will hold its secornd
meeting of the semester on Tuesday
evening, March 13, at the Interna=
tional Center. The meeting will bc-
gin promptly at 7:30. Students of
Polish descent are invited to attend.

X% j k
t:4
BANK

at your convenience.

101 Sou'Tii MAIN

330 SouTH STATE

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

__ . . _ .**

r

j

1

----- -- -

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION
ANN ARBOR, MICH. SUNDAY, MARCH 11, 1945

*

will open sometime in the
middle of April.
MICHIGAN'S famed team
balance, plus liberal aid
from old Lady Luck, re-
sulted in a one-point Wol-
verine triumph over a
powerful Illinois squad at
the Western Conference in-
door track championships
at Evanston Saturday. The
score was 55 1/10 to
,54 1/10. Although the Il-
lini copped seven of twelve
first places and tied for an
eighth, while Michigan
won only two, some shrend
placing of men by Coach
Ken Doherty in the dis-
tance events brought the
Wolverines the title for
the third successive year.
Again it was the dynamite
Fume twin combination
that spelled victory. Broth-
ers Ross and Bob tied for
first in the mile, and Bob
placed first in the two-mile.
Michigan scored virtual
slams in all three distance
events, racking up 31
points in those alone. The
rest of the Wolverine
points were widely scat-
tered throughout the re-

ern Conference swimming

championship, beating out
Ohio State, the number
one threat, 55 to 43. Indi-
ana was third with 19.1
Sweeping five of a possible
nine first places, including
both relays, the Wolverines
jumped into an early lead !
in the 300-yard medley re-
lay and were never headed.
Mert Church was Michi
gan's only double winner,
and one of two in the meet,
as he won the 50 and 100-
yard freestyle events. Keo
Nakama, Ohio State dis-
tance star, took the 220
and 440 as expected.
THE FIRST OAK Leaf
Cluster to the Air Medal
has been awarded to Sec-
and Lieutenant William J.
Bielauskas, a pilot for a I
combat cargo squadron of
the Tenth Air Force. Hold-
er of the DFO, this former
student has chalked up 163
combat missions totaling
652 hours during his seven
months of service in the 1
India-Burma theatre.
RETIRING RECENTLY

(HICAGO
sym- PHONY

DESIREDEFAUWU

MONDAY HOURS: 12:00 to 8:30

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