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June 15, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-06-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

p

FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 1945

TNF ICHI CA N D A TIN

v A t'iv c mot,

A tHE IAM1l1 1 (Y IN fL H V. 1U is 1A'.4 AA'.. CR ~1. C. .L

rAUL SEWWVEN&

i

Football Squad To Start Practice

iit1y 2 for

1945 Season

Tigers Await
Return to Club
of Greenberg
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, June 14- The Detroit
Tigers still had received no direct
word today from Hank Greenberg,
who passed through the Army's sep-
aration center at Ft. Dix, returning
to civilian status after four years in
service.
General Manager Jack Zeller of the
Tigers declared, "We'll have no
trouble over a contract. He's entitled
to the same salary he was getting
when he was inducted in 1941."
At that time the slugging Tiger
outfielder was reportedly the highest
salaried player in baseball, drawing
$55,000 a year.

DIDYoU
By MURRA
. . . That in 1904, Michigan's fa-
mous point-a-minute football team
rolled up the amazing total of 130
points against West Virginia to es-
tablish an all time high for points
scored in one game by a Wolverine
eleven.
. . . That William Watson, who
holds Michigan's and the Big Ten
shot put record with a heave of 52
ft. 11 3/4 inches, is also the Na-
tional Decathlon champion. He
scored 5994 points in 10 events to
outaistance all other rivals.
. . That track Coach Ken Doherty
also specialized in the decathlon,
which consists of 100, 400, and 1,500
meter runs, broad jump, high jump,

sA
,-
Face e sumrer
InI
r
w
M O E £0St otSae
7? 1 North University 907 South State

Blrowns
IKN Tigers,
A~Y GRANT Sehn
Ste he
shot put, discus, pole vault, javelin;-
and 110 meter hurdles. DetrotClin
That in 1929, Coach Doherty Over Yanke
set a National AAU record in the By The Associ
decathlon when he scored 7,784 DETROIT, June
points. Also in the 1928 Olympics, j ens, belting Brownie
he set a one day decathlon mark that bed out two mighty
still stands as a record and then went d otall three runs toy
on to capture third place with 7,600 took a 3-to-2 verdict
points, then nine points short of a leadingDetroiteTige
WOrld's record. ilang DtotTge
world s rec rd T t d nStephens, who l
S . That during the four years Wii- with 10 circuit blov
lie fleston played football for Michi- into the upper righ
gan he scored 110 touchdowns in 44 the fourth inning,
games, none of which Michigan lost. Milt Byrnes, who h
. . . That, outside of the charmed other, into the left fi
circle of Ivy League teams, Michi- nobody on base, bro
gan has produced more All-Ameri- the ninth.
cans than any other school in the Trout Yields Five H
country. Aside from Steph
..n.rThat in World Olympics three the browns had on
Michigan men have turned in the Paul (Dizzy) Troutc
feat of copping both the 100 and 200 sent him to his fift
meter runs. They are Archie Hahn as many wins.
i. 1904, Ralph Craig in 1912 and Sig Jakucki, who
Eddie Tolan in 1932. Detroit hits, won hi
That Charles Dvorak, ace pole Pete Gray, one-arm
,aulter for Michigan at the turn of fielder, retired from
the century, captured this event in shoulder injury whe
both the 1900 and 1904 Olympics. a diving catch in the
That Fielding H. Yost, contrary Tigers Half Game:A
to common belief, considers his 1925 The defeat left t
football team, not any of the point- game ahead of the s
a-minute aggregations, as his best. York Yankees, who
This team, with its famous Benny to The Tigers broke
Benny pass combination, Friedman in the second inning
to Oosterbaan, won 7 games while when Jim Outlaw s
losing only one. This loss was at the Christman's glover
hands of Northwestern and was the doubled to right cen
famous 3-2 decision, third on Bob Swift's
. . . That Michigan withdrew from Trout left him ther
the Conference on January 14, 1908 to end the inning.
and resumed membership on Novem- Eddie Mayo triple
ber 20, 1917. one away in the thir
. That Michigan once had teams as Roy Cullenbine1
in Cross Country and Fencing, but Rudy York grounde
each were discontinued in 1932. St. Louis took the 1
That baseball was the first sport fourth when Stephe
started at Michigan in 1866, while followed Byrnes' pa,
football in 1879 and track in 1893 Quinn then singled b
rank second and third. further trouble.
. . That Indiana University and Trout's 400-foott
the State University of Iowa were ad- Gray's head with one
mitted on December 1, 1899, while fifth helped tie the s
Ohio State was admitted on April 6, ing after Gray mad
1912. of Joe Hoover's deep

Mnars

.>.

gs to Lead
Ies in AL
ated Press
14-Vern Steph-
shortstop, club-
homers, driving
day as St. Louis
from the league
Bads the league
ws, pounded one
ht field seats in
scoring back of
ad walked. The
ield pavilion with
ke a 2-all tie in
its
hens' two clouts
ly three hits off
of the Tigers but
h defeat against
scattered nine
s fourth victory.
ned Brownie out-
the game with a
n he fell making
e fifth inning.
head .
he Tigers a half
econd place New
were idle.
the scoring ice
getting one run
ingled off Mark
and Bob Maier
ter. Maier took
s infield out but
e by fouling out
!d to center with
d but died there
popped out and
d.
ead at 2-1 in the
ens' first homer
ss. George Mc-
ut Trout avoided
triple over Pete
out in the Tiger
core, Trout scor-
e a diving catch
fly.

Hard Word Order
Of Day for Squad
By BILL MULLENDORE
Coach H. O. "Fritz" Crisler prom-
ises plenty of hard work for those
varsity football candidates who re-
port, for summer practice, July 2,
when Michigan will begin intensive
preparations for the 1945 grid cam-
paign which opens Sept. 15.
"We want every candidate on hand
f',r the opening day of practice,"
Crisler said. "With Great Lakes,
Indiana, and Michigan State as our
first three opponents, we will need
all the work we can get if we are
going to be ready when the start of
the season rolls around."
Schedule T nughi
The 1945 schedule is one of the
toughest ever drawn up for a Mich-
igan squad, Crisler stated, in review-
ing the prospects for the season.
Evey squad-member, lie continued,
will have to be on his toes every min-
ute of every practice session, if the
chaUengc of that schedule is to be
met.
Several of the teams on the sched-
ule, Crisler said, have already had
the benefit of intensive spring prac-
tice. Others will bring summer drills
before the Wolverines get underway,
indicating that the Michigan squad
will have some catching up to do.
Have Brief Layoff
Summer practice will be the order
of the day from July 2 to August
10. After a two-week layoff, drills
will begin again August 27 with the
opening of fall practice and continue
until the start of the season.
The Wolverines will have seven or
eight lettermen back from the 1944
eleven which finished second to Ohio
BUY MORE BONDS
'7
i~

State last season in the Western
Conference. Several promising new-
comers are also expected to bolster
the squad.
Following the Great Lakes opener,
Sept. 15 here, the Wolverines will be
at home for their next two games,
meeting Indiana, Sept. 23, and Mich-
igan State, Sept. 29. Crisler will
take his squad to Evanston, Ill., Oct.
6, for a game with Northwestern, and
the Wolverines will travel to New

York City, Oct. 13, for the featured
clash with Army. .
Oct. 20 has been left as an open
date, but Michigan will swing back
into action Oct. 27, meeting Illinois
at Champaign. Minnesota comes to
Ann Arbor Nov. 3, and the Wolver-
ines are scheduled to play Navy at
Baltimore, Nov. 10. Purdue and Ohio
State will furnish the opposition for
the next two tilts, Nov. 17 and 24,
both at home.

the Wolverines will travel to New both at home.

COME

r
,l
. /+
' _
r+
_
,
- ,
ti
,.
.

leat Opener with Great Lakes Sept. 15;
- as Indiana, Michigan State Will Follow

THIS

SUMMER

in the

coal

green

woods.

Special Rates for Servicemen

COURTESY CAR

Golf s'ide. Riding Stables

Phone 2-3441

3250 East Huron River Drive

lull ________________________II
pg pg'7.

NO.

1 BIG TEN

BACKSTOP:

Stevenson Acclaimed by Coach
As 'Our -Best Catcher in Years'

Slips.... Gowns. . . Housecoats

' /i. i

Jersey Lounging

Pajamas

Ii

W r - r - r - w ' - w

t
,
'
'
._
; ::,- ::
:
,
fie- o,
-

cool
cotton
frocks
The finished little cot-
tons that flash on city
manners like gloves...
keep you gay and gala"
daily. Come in and see
our new collection of
colorful cottons. Just
the thing for these
warm summer days!

Vast improvement in hishbatting
and continued excellence in handling
of pitchers place Michigan's Bob
Stevenson head and shoulders above
any catchers met by the baseball
team this season, according to Coach
Ray Fisher.
Stevenson, playing all eight games,
was second among the regulars with
a batting average of .346, and he has
a fielding average of .986 to his
credit.
Stevenson's years in professional
baseball before coming to the Uni-
versity in the V-12 program and his
subsequent years here enable him to
compare advantages of pro ball with
those of playing on a college team.
Praises Fisher
"Pro players are much more base-
ball-wise," he said, but added that
one does not often find the patience
of college coaches such as Fisher.
"Working under Ray," he continued,
has been a privilege as well as a
valuable experience."
Stevenson admits that, everything
considered, he prefers pro to college
baseball and intends to continue
catching as long as he is able.
Of the many notabae events of this
year's successful baseball season,
Stevenson likes to remember the
three games the team swept from
Notre Dame and also the look on
Ray Fisher's face at the end of the
decisive Purdue series, kvhen the
team emerged Conference champions
for the second consecutive year.
The 22 year old from Cincinnati is
II

concluding his second year here. He
arrived in '44, never having seen a
colege game, with five years experi-
ence in eastern leagues and also the
Intnernational League behind him.
The season just past is probably
his last on the team. "We'll miss
him," stated Coach Fisher, "He's
bLen our best receiver in years."

8 NICKELS ARCADE

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THE NEW SCHEDULE OF HOURS,
MONDAY THAO[UGH FItIDAY, OPEN AT
3:00 P.M.; SATURDAY AT 12:00 NOON AND

SUNDAY AT 1:00 P.M.

WE WILL NOW OPEN RT 3:0

III

$795

o $2495

~i
1
Before Finals
. .. .

I

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PREVIOUSLY

WE

OPENED

I

I

P.M.

ON MONDRY WHEREAS

R T

700

P.M.

ON

THIS

DRY

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