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June 15, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-06-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

C

Display Relates How Japan Got on Map

+

DAILY OFFICIAL

BULLETIN

+

pears as a single small island off the
Asiatic coast.
Columbus Found Cuba
Columbus in his voyage of 1492
hoped to reach Japan and the rich
isles of the east, and found Cuba in-
stead. On Ruysch's world atlas of
1507 the isles of Japan, later describ-
ed by Marco Polo, are identified with
the Island of Cuba, discovered by
Columbus. Another item in the pos-
session of the Clement's Library is
a 1496 edition of Marco Polo's de-
scription of his journey in the Orient,

iii

the most famous travel book of the
Middle Ages, which includes his de-
scription of Japan.
The map grew as reports of sea-
men and missionaries reached Eu-
rope, and on the Diego Homen map
of 1558, drawn by Hakluyt, Japan
appears in slightly more detail. On
the map published in 1553 by the
Florentine cartographer Gastaldi,
the name "Japan" first is used, al-
though it was spelled "Giapam."
For centuries the legendary Isles
of Gold and Silver haunted the map
of the Pacific. First mentioned by
the Spaniards, they were never
found. On a map published in *1589
the Isle of Silver is shown in its rela-
tion to Japan. On a much later Jap-I
anese world map of 1850, these leg-
endary islands are still shown, illu-
strating the slow transmission of
western knowledge to Japan.
Main Islands in 1672
The three main islands, Honshu,
Kyushu and Shikoku, appear for
the first time in the great atlas of
Ortelius, published in 1672. In 1650
a map was made of northern Japan,
part of the Hokkaidas, and the
southern Kurile Islands by De Vries,
a captain in the Dutch East India
Company, who was sailing along the
coast of Japan in search of the Gold
and Silver Isles.
Other maps on display at the Cle-
ment's Library include a Dutch sea-
chart of Japan from Pieter de Goo'.
"Sea Atlas" of 1669, maps dated 1670
and 1802 of Nagasaki and the Dutch
harbor of Deshima, an 1820 French
map of the Pacific which showed the
results of Russian and English dis-
coveries, and Perry's map of Japan
of 1855.
Healt h Service
Aids "''Campsr

Publication in the Daily Official Bul-
letin is constructive notice to all mem-
bers of the University. Notices for the
Bulletin should be sent In typewritten
form to the Assistant to the President,
1021 Angel Hall, by 2:30 p. m. of the day
preceding publication (10:30 a. at. Sat-
urdays).
CENTRAL WAR TIME USED IN
THE DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN.
FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 1945
VOL. LV, No. 173
Notices
President and Mrs. Rutliven will be
at home to alumni, members of the
graduating classes and their friend.s,
on Friday afternoon, June 22, from
3:00 to 5:00 CWT.
PLANS FOR COMMENCEMENT
Commencement: Saturday, June
23, 1945, 9:30 a. m. CWT.
WEATHER FAIR
Time of Assembly: 8:30 a. m. CWT
(except noted).
PLACES OF ASSEMBLY
Members of the Faculties at 8:45
a. m. in Angell Hall, Room 1223,
Rhetoric Library, where they may
robe.
Regents, Ex-Regents, and Deans at
8:45 a. m. in Angell Hall, Room 1011,
the Regents' Room.
Students of the various schools and
colleges, as follows:
Literature, Science and the Arts
on Main Diagonal walk between Li- t
brary and Engineering Buildings.
Education on walk in front of
Physiology and Pharmacology Build-
ing.
Engineering on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Court.
Architecture on Main Diagonal
walk in Engineering Arch (behind
Engineers).
Nurses on diagonal walk between
Chemistry Building and Library.
Law on East and West walk, West
of the intersection in front of Li-
brary.
Pharmacy on East and West walk,
I West of the intersection in front of
Library (behind Law).
Dental Surgery on North and South
walk between Library and Natural
Science Building.
Business Administration on walk
north side of Physiology and Phar-
macology Building.
Forestry and Conservation on walk
north side of Physiology and Phar-
macology Building (behind Bus.Ad.)
Music on main diagonal walk from
Library to Natural Science Building,
North of Library.

Public Health on main diagonal
walk from Library to Natural Science
Building. (behind Music).
Graduate on main diagonal walk
near Natural Science Building.
Color Guard and Honor Guard and
Band in front of main Library.
Line of March: Library to South
University to State Street to North
University to Hill Auditorium.
WEATHER RAINY
The sounding of the University
Power House Siren at 8:30 a. m. will
indicate that the march to Hill Audi-
torium has been abandoned.
Students will proceed directly to
Hill Auditorium and enter through
one of the three main center doors.
(Doors open at 9:00 a. m. CWT).
Members of the Faculties will as-
semble in the second floor dressing
rooms and take their places on the
platform in the Auditorium.
Regents, Ex-Regents, Deans and
other participating officials will as-
semble in the first floor dressing
Srooms of Hill Auditorium.
Automobile Regulation. The Uni-
versity Automobile Regulation will be

lifted at 12:00 noon EWT (11:00 a.m.
CWT) on Saturday, June 23, 1945.
The Ruling will be resumed for the
Summer Term at 8:00 a.m. EWT
(7:00 a.m. CWT) on July 2, 1945.
Identification Cards which were
issued for the Summer, Fall and
Spring of 1944-45 will be revalidated
for the Summer Term 1945 and must
be turned in at the time of registra-
tion. The 1944-45 cards will be used
for an additional term because of
the shortage of film and paper.
Library Hours, June 23-July 1:
The General Library and the Divi-
sional Libraries will be closed Sat-
urday, June 23, Commencement Day.
From June 25-30 the General Li-
brary will be closed while repairs are
in progress. Divisional Libraries will
also be closed during this period with
the exception of Engineering, East
Engineering, Mathematics-Econom-
ics, and Physics, which will be open
on a shortened schedule. Hours will
be posted on the doors.
Sunday service will be discontinued
after June 17 until the beginning of
the Fall Term.
Change of Address: Everyone who

is registered with the Bureau, in eith-
er the General or Teaching Division,
is reminded to leave a summer ad-
dress and telephone in the office,
This should be done whether you plan
to be at home or somewhere else,
Anyone who has accepted a position
and has not yet reported it is urged
to do so at once, as calls are coming
in every day. It causes much confu-
sion and loss of time if the Bureau
recommends you after you have alr
ready accepted a job.
University Bureau of Appointments
and Occupational Information,
United States Civil Service an-
nouncement for Dental Hygienist,
$1970 a year, Office Machine Opera-
tor Positions, $1560 to $2433 a year,
and Printer, $1.32 to $1.39 an hour,
(Continued on Page 4)
TEACHERS WANTED
Ind. Arts, Science, Coaches, Others
for California, New York, Michi-
gan and elsewhere. $2800 to $3000
frequently offered. Enroll Free,
Cline Teachers' Agency, East Lan-
sing, Mich.

_ ___ _ 4 .

----- ------ -

. ._ i

II

UH
DUMP THOSE

AN EAGER BEAVER

11111

I

"The responsibility of the Univer-
sity Health Service extends to Uni-
versity summer camps all the way
from the forestry camp in north-
ern Michigan to the geology camp
in Wyoming," Dr. Warren E. For-
sythe, Director of the Health Service,
said yesterday.I
Dr. Robert C. Plank of the Uni-
versity Hospital will go to the Uni-
versity Biological Station located
near Cheyboygan on Lake Douglas
at the beginning of the summer ses-
sion. There he will act as resident
physician, taking care of injuries,
insect bites, and burns suffered by
persons at the station. Dr. Wil-
liam M. Brace of the University
Health Service will join Dr. Plank
at this station during the month of
August.
BUY MORE BONDS

BOOKS

for a few hours, call up that lit-tle cutie, and drag
her to the last big fling of the semester. It will
give you that extra pep you need for the coming

11

in the waste basket .

year.
A TUIIDAY, JUNE I6, -
MIC~iGAN UNiON

1..A0 PerCou ple

AM-

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- I

DAD'S DAY

-SUNDAY, JUNE 17th

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4 ;
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i ££'
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.6 .P "i.

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Ties and Shirt Combinations

Summer

Wash

Robes~c

HOSIERY. . . NUNN-BUSH SHOES

LOUNGE
Leather

JACKETS.

... STRAW

HATS

Goods

too numerous to mention!

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