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June 14, 1945 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-06-14

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ISDA, JINE 14, 1945

H MICHIGAN DAILY

I:.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.....,..

NRO's Capture Major Events
In Gala Navy Olympics Meet
Forrestal, Dykemra Take Track Races; Battalion and Claude Hesse repre-
a/ senting the Marines. Stu Snyder
Po1setto Defeats L1intol in Boxmig also won on a fall. His victory came
at the 1:15 mark of the second per-
*iod over Jim Bauer.
By CHUCK LEWIS 2 in a close decision. In the 165- The highlight of the Olympics was
In the best spirits of Navy tradi- pound division, Ned Hewitt of the g ntic tack meet in whic t
tion, the representatives of the Naval 3rd Battalion outslugged Marine compiling a total of 58 points to 45
ROTC unit on campus came through George Avila in a hard-fought slug- for the 1st and 2nd Battalions who
victorious in the Navy Olympics held fest. The feature bout of the eve- tied for second-place honors. Varsity.
last night at Ferry Field. ning was between varsity footballers trackfmenseonaehinrs r
Mass Calisthenics Held Joe Ponsetto and John Lintel. In this track men dominated individual scor-
slu B 1P tt ug taking all but one first place.
Activities commenced at 7:00 p.m. slugging Brawl, Ponsetto won on a Chuck Dykema, Dick Forrestal and
EWT (6:00 CWT) with the five bat- close decision. Warren Bents won Bob Grandy were the double win-
talions marching to the scene of hos- the 175-pound championship. The
tilities to the music of the Navy bloodiest battle of the encounter saw Dykema took the high and low
marching band. In their formations, Marine, Hetrik, decisively vanq hurdles, and Forrestal emerged vic-
an inspiring calisthenics drill was NRO Dick Alban. torious in the 220 and 440-yard
conducted with all the battalions Varsity Wrestlers Win dashes, as well as being a member of
performing. At the conclusion of The members of the varsity wrestl- the winning half-mile relay team..
mass exercise drill, the 3rd battalion ing team prmved their ability in the Grandy captured firsts in the shot
started competition in a one-minute wrestling finals. The draw between put and discus throw and helped the
exhibition of calisthenics. The 1st Fred Booth and Newt Skillman and NRO's to win the mile relay.
battalion won first place in this the no-decision grapple of Bob Git- Other winners were Mank Fonde
event. tens and Bob Johnston were the in the 100 in a time of 10.3, Dick Bar-
The finals of the boxing tourna- highlights of the hostilities. Walt nard .taking the 880, and Charlie
ment were closely contested. In the Blumenstein pinned Roger Glass in Birdsall in the mile. John McNab
first match, Leon Cummings of 2nd 1:24-of the first round. Non-varsity and Warren Bentz took the high
battalion beat Dick Fletcher of Num- winners were Justin Fairbanks of 1st jump and pole vault, respectively.
~F~f -V-FL-LLFfr- fVLL L l-_flTfLr Mf~lfU l I I 11 i fl O flf~llA
YOU WILL BE TIEBOWN
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YOU FAL TO" HOW H

Itakin9 the I#'uh44
By HANK MANTRO
Daily Sports Editor

INFORMATION

Fans' Attitude to Crosby-Hope

Golf Contest Baffles Experts

THAT ALL-ENCOMPASSING word, time, and the swiftness with which
it works, finally managed to catch up with me and brought me to the
realization that those long years, from a freshman's cognizance of every-
thing, to that of a supposedly-mature senior, were not as long as I had
first anticipated, and I now even find myself coming down the home stretch.
It has been a traditional policy on the sports staff of the Michigan
Daily for every editor to write his swan song before last rites are
administered. This is another one of those things that you want to
keep putting off until the last minute, but that last minute eventually
elapses, and then you find yourself in desperate straits. Though a
newspaper writer is known for his wordiness, I can sympathize with my
predecessors; several of whom, looked at me with perturbed expres-
sions and asked for my help in a choice of a topic when they were i
writing their epitaphs. I couldn't understand how such a little thing
could upset them so much and I laughed it off, but I somehow wish
that I could laugh this off too.
However, since Professor Price has announced a pre-exam bluebook
for us in Shakespeare, I can easily rationalize and thus ascribe my ner-
vousness to this-but I still don't feel any better.
In retrospect, my years here have been full of the excitement and
thrills that are characteristic of college life. Though the various athletic
teams have performed admirably, three events stand out very clearly.
The first of these occurred in the 1943-44 season, when Michigan
teams captured eight out of nine possible Big Ten titles to become the
first team in the Western Conference to ever compile such an impressive
record.
The second of these events took place at the start of the spring
semester when Coaches Mat Mann, swimming mentor, and Ken Doherty,
track coach, battled furiously to see which team could win the Big Ten
crown first and thereby chalk up the 100th title for Michigan teams
since they first started participation in athletics. Though it was a fight
to the finish, Coach Mann and his swimmers got their title first and
accorded Michigan the honor of being the first Mid-West school to
even approach such an excellent mark.
When Michigan managed to cop first places in the distance medley,
sprint.medley, two mile and four mile relays, the Wolverine track team
broke its annual jinx of never being able to win more than two places at
the Penn Relays, even managing to come in second to Army in the only
other event that they had entered, the mile-relay, and this is the third
event I have chosen.

By RUTH ELCONIN+
Sports experts are stumped to say
the least concerning the attitude of
American golf fans, and, putting it
frankly, either the fans do not know
what they want in the way of golf
spectacles, or they do.
Ed Danforth, sports editor of the
Atlanta (Ga.) Journal, reported in a
recent article of Sports Week about
two golf matches which were held,
not long ago, for charity. One drew
7,200 people and the other attracted
a crowd of 25,000 fans.
Nelson, Snead Play
Danforth went on to say that one
of theYmatches, whichswas held near
New York, saw the services of the
two finest golfers in the country,
Byron Nelson and Sammy Snead,
who played before 7,200 people. Both
men have been in the limelight all
winter, playing in a series of sensa-
tional contests from coast to coast.
The other match was held in the
Chicago area, on the famous Tam
O'Shanter course, with Bob Hope and
Bing Crosby playing golf, so to speak,
but yet they out-drew the Nelson-
Snead match by 17,800 paid admis-
sion.
Continuing with the article, Dan-
forth said, "The professionals play

ed brilliantly." It was golf at its
precision best. But when Hope teed
off in Chicago and struck his ball, it
exploded with a roar; so did the gal-
lery. From then on the match was
a zany affair that was compressed to
10 holes, five out and five back,"
What Does the Public Want?
Now the question is, "What does
the public want to see, a good game
of golf or just go out on the links
and watch a hilarious match, and do
they really like the game for what
it is or are the players the great at-
traction?"
Danforth expressed the opinion
that maybe the National Open would
have a better attendance if Bob
Burns, Jack Benny, or Bert Lahr were
entered.
A solution, which Danforth cited
so that golf might crash the "big
gate" class again, was to have the
Nelsons and Sneads hire a stable of
gag writers and learn to entertain
the galleries between shots.

PLEASE:

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MICHIGAN UNION SATIiDAY, JUNE 16
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MAKE DAD S DRAMS COME TRI

T'HEN, TOO, Coach Ray Fisher's 25th anniversary present, his second
successive Big Ten baseball crown, was not only an appropriate gift
but also ended the sports year on a high keynote. Along with the termi-
nation of sports for the spring, outfielder Don Lund got his ninth letter
as a Michigan athlete and became the seventh such award winner in the
history of the school, which has seen thousands of athletes pass through its
portals. "Smoke" thus gave me another memoir to unload upon my grand-
children.
And as we begin to near the end, it is only fitting to remark upon
next year's football team, which will face one of the toughest assign-
ments ever scheduled. The two games that are watched with glee are
the ones with Army and Navy, and many wonder what Coach Fritz
Crisler has up his sleeve for these games. Since we are playing the two
top-teams in the country this year, we should also see Milan Lazetich,
brilliant Wolverine tackle, and outstanding candidate for a berth on this
year's All-American squad, finally join Michigan's list of immortals and
end the draught of Michigan All-Americans, which started last season.
With sincere congratulations to Michigan coaches on the fine records
they have established and the excellent athletes they have built, as well as
my thanks for their utmost cooperation, I am about ready to follow the path
that my associate, Dave Loewenberg,
took last week. So, as the sun begins
to sink slowly in the west, its shadows
I have engulfed me and I will try to
'follow suit.

ITER
AVIS.
ervice
UIE

SELL ALL

YOUR

FOR
or EXCHANGE at

i

AMERICAN LEAGUE
TEAMS W L Pet.
Detroit ..........27 17 .614
New York .......27 19 .587
Boston..........33 23 .500
Chicago .........23 24 .489
St. Louis ........22 23 .489
Washington .....21 23 .477
Cleveland .......20 24 .455
Philadelphia.....17 27 .386

GB
1
5
5
51
6
7
10
GB
1
112
2
3
16

NATIONAL LEAGUE

TEAMS
x-New York
Pittsburgh
x-Brooklyn
x-St. Louis
Chicago ....
Boston.....
x -Cincinnati
Philadelphia

W
.....28
.27
....26
.. ..26
.....23
.....24
. .21

L
19
20
20
21
20
22
24

Pct.
.596
.574
.565
.553
.535
.522
.467

Major League
Standings

x-Playing night game.
BUAR BONDS

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0ggE AND WOVEN SY
G DOALL WORSTED CO.
By BEAU BRUMMELt
4aLt0 CpNT'6.U.S.PAI.RE.20942
NONE GENUINE
WITHOUT THIS LAEL
J.JUNE 17th

SignaI Corps Photo
Ever on the alert are these sea-
soned jungle fighters of the Carib-
bean Defense Command in the Ca-
nal Zone. The guns speak first,

is

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