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June 06, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-06-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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m~an9 the teoun 44

By HANK MANTHO
Dily Sports Editor

AS THE professional golfers came off the winter circuit and began to lay
their plans for the summer, many reports arose as to who was the great-
est golfer of all time, and the biggest percentage of yeas gave this classi-
fication to Byron Nelson.
The only other golfer to appear as an opponent worthy of the
title was Bobby Jones, but even the Jones admirers who saw Bobby in his
first and last National Open and most of the championships he played
in between, claimed that Jones could never have matched the 263
by which Nelson won the tournament in Atlanta.
Older golf partisans maintain that Harry Vardon, British professional,
and Walter Hagen; known for his competitive nature, were both the super-
iors of Nelson, but from reports of scribes who have seen all three men
play and judged their talents objectively, neither of the two old-timers
was tougher than Nelson was across the winter circuit.
A UNITED PRESS release out of Atlanta said that Nelson's 263 set an
all-time tournament record, although George Duncan of England
managed to post a score under 260 in 1913 in the Swiss Open, which score
still stands as the official tournament record.
Nelson's play at Atlanta amounted to 65 3/4 strokes a round or
about 3.6 strokes per hole. This type of golf should not be allowed
since it is very discouraging to the average pro golfer and may even-
tually ruin the professional game.
Nelson's scoring average for the season was the best ever compiled and
he was never out of the running in any of the events that he decided to enter.
Sammy Snead and 'Jug' McSpaden are the only linksters capable of
offering Byron any competition whatsoever, and though they are as adept
at certain shots as Nelson, there is no one who can weave a skein of shots
so consistently as Nelson.
Nelson will again go into action this month at the Calumet Country
Club, when the maestro will be vieing for honors in the third playing of
the Chicago Victory National Open championship.
Big Ten Honors Wiese

Bowmart, Kell
Lead Michigan
Nine Batting3
Wolver Ii es ILive Won
.19 Str li t Vict e rie o*I
Three (iglies Lemain
Entering the final week of the 1945
bas;eball season with encounters
against a Grosse Ile Naval squad and
the Ohio State Buckeyes Thursday
and Saturday, Pitcher Bo Bowman
and third baseman Wait Kell are
leading the Conference champions at
the plate with marks of .423 and .363
respectively.
Kell, stellar performer at the third
sack, has the more noteworthy aver-
age due to the greater number of1
times at hat, but Bowman passing
from the bottom of the list to the
top has done more than expected for
a pitcher, and has also won six games
on the mound for Coach Ray Fisher.
The team as a group has also im-
proved greatly at the plate, as Bob
Stevenson, Bill Gregor, Don Lund,
Jack Weisenburger, and Dom Tomasi
have advanced from the low two
hundreds nearer the coveted goal of1
.300, with Stevenson passing that
mark.
Opposing pitchers have had to
duck a great many times in the past
few tilts, for the Wolverines have
shown no mercy by banging out 86
blows -in six games.
Ray Louthen, running his winning
streak to eight games, and Bowman
clinched the Big Ten title for the
Michigan squad with their double
victory over Purdue last Saturday
and both will be striving to annex
the remaining games which would
give the Wolverines 22 victories
against one defeat for the season.
While running up their present 19
consecutive wins the team has
amassed 181 bingles in 670 times at
bat and has driven 130 runs across
the plate for a team average of .289.
While this is some 13 points below
the mark of .302 hung up by last
year's championship nine, it repre-
sents a steady climb from a weak
early season start. Michigan's hitting
in recent games recently lead Coach
Fisher to call the 1945 club "the best
hitting team I've ever had."

Naval Aeadevmy
Squad Favored
In NCAA Meet

Bob Wiese, who captained last fall's
Wolyerine football squad until he was
transferred from the campus V-121
unit after playing in six games, has
been awarded the Western Confer-
ence medal for proficiency in schol-
arship and in athletics during 1944.
Now a midshipman at Annapolis,
Wiese was a three-sport man at. the,
university, winning varsity letters in
football, basketball, and baseball.
When Bill Daley, All American full-l
back in 1943. was transferred to the

University, Wiese unprotestingly
switched from his fullback role to
quarterback, but went back to full-
back when Daley left. Last year, the
Jamestown, N. D., athlete was select-
ed for the all-Conference squad.
Wiese was a reserve forward in
basketball and led the Conference in
hitting dui'ing the baseball season
with an average well over .400. He
also starred in the field for the Mich-
igan nine; playing in the outfield dur-
ing two seasons and alternating on
the mound last spring.

olriseacin A oaiLegralized
unt Miuhgmiby ocurt .decision

RETURNED-Navy Lieut. Jack
Brennan, guard on the 1939 Michi-
gan football squad, has returned!
to Ann Arbor after seeing action
in the South Pacific. Brennan's rel-
atives received a scare when his
picture was included in a story
published by a Detroit newspaper
in connection with the death of
another Jack Brennan. The for-
mer Michigan athlete, however,
has not even been scratched in
combat.
Pirates Spoil
Reds' Spree
With 9-1l Win
NEW YORK. June 5-(I)--Cincin-
nati's nine-game winning streak went
up in smoke today as the Pittsburgh
Pirates clubbed out a 9-1 edge over
the Redlegs in the second game of a
doubleheader after bowing in the
opener, 4-0.
Max Butcher halted the Cincinnati
splurge with a neat seven-hitter as
the Pirates slugged Walter (Boom
Boom) Beck and three successors for
a total of 13 safeties.
Ed Heusser blanked Pittsburgh in
the first game with seven blows and
hit a home run in the fifth inning
to help make it stick. It was Heus-
ser's fifth triumph and his second
whitewash job on the Buccos who
have scored only one run on the vet-
eran in 27 innings.
A twi-night doubleheader in Phil-
adelphia with the Boston Braves was
washed out ° as was a single night
game between Chicago and St. Louis
at Sportsman's Park.
Only day action scheduled in the
American, Philadelphia at Boston,
was postponed by rain, making a
doubleheader tomorrow.
Cincinnati . .000 110 002- 4 10 1E
Pittsburgh ..000 000 000- 0 7 0
Heusser & Riddle; Strincevich
& Lopez.
Cincinnati . . 000 001 000- 1 7 1
Pittsburgh . .002 322 00x- 9 13 0
Beck, Fox, Bosser, Lisenbee &
Lakeman, Riddle; Butcher & Lo-
pez.
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Teuim To Seek Sitigle
11olos 1108;iies To 111111
By BILL MULLENDORCE
With hopes for a team title blast-
ed by the size and strength of a pow-
erful 20-man U. S. Naval Academy
squad, Michigan's seven-man cinder;
contingent selected by Coach Doh-
erty to represent the University at the
annual NCAA Track and Field meet
Saturday at Milwaukee will be gun-
ning for individual honors and a
chance to beat out Illinois' Confer-
ence champions for secondi money.
The Wolverines' main hopes for
first places center around Bob and
Ross Hume, defending co-titlists in
the mile, who are expected to be
able to compete Saturday despite
medical school requirements. Other
Michigan entrants include distance
men Archie Parsons, Bob Thomason,
and Charles Birdsall, quarter-miler
Dick Forrestal, and high jumper John
McNab.
Coach Doherty said that he did not
plan to use the Humes in more than
one event, but indicated that he
might run each in separate races.
Bob will probably go in the mile,
along with Thomason, while Ross is
tentatively slated for the half mile,
where Parsons is also among the en-
trants.
Birdsall, Big Ten two-mile champ,
will run in his specialty, and Forres-,
tal is a definite starter in the 440.
McNab, if he makes the trip, will
compete against a strong field in the
high jump.
Navy, boasting one of the nation's
strongest squads, is expected to have
little trouble winning the meet on
the basis of numbers alone. The 20-
man Middie sqUad is almost three
times the size of the next largest en-
try.
Illinois, by virtue of its triumph
over the Wolverines in the Confer-
ence outdoor clash, has been install-
ed as second place favorite. The Il-
lini also have a seven-man group
ready to go, but will be minus the
services of Bob Kelley, Big Ten
champ in the 440 and 880, who is
not eligible for another year of com-
petition under NCAA rules.
lBating Averages

The high notes of this two-piece Ellen Kaye
dress are its young, young lines and softly
scalloped detils. Look how it whittles
your waist,.how smoothly it fits and flatters,
Designed in Tegra, a spun rayon
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Sizes 7 to 15.
1991
COLLINS.

y rhe Associated Press
DETROIT, June 5 - - :Horse racing in Michigan received a go ahead
siiv igl today fromClio the t Sullernu Cour
'Iwo tracks jimnedia tel y' :w g into action as soon as the announce-
myent was issued on the court's decision to permit a resumption of horse
racing.
Trotting events at Northville Downs, near Detroit, will begin tomot-
row night with a nine race card. The harness races will continue
through July 4.
The Detroit Racing Association announced an 85-day meeting from
June 16 to Sept. 22. General Manager George Lewis said he expected
approximately 900 horses for the opening day at the Fairgrounds.
The State Supreme Court at Lansing issued a stay on an injunction
by Circuit Judge Guy L. Miller, prohibiting horse racing and pari-
mutuel betting.

..

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7-
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Begin with: The suit, in brown gabar-
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Add: The lovely rayon jersey
polka-dot blouse at 8.95.
Suabtract: The skirt . .
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Result One basic outfit that af-
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<, by adding or subtracting.
SUITS in Brown, Rose, Navy and Powder Blue.
BLOUSES, Brown, Red, Grey.

Bowman
Kell ...
Soboleski
Stevensor
Rosema
Gregor .
Lund ...
Weisenbu
Tomasi
Nelson
Lou then

AB
.. . ..26
.........20
. . . .. . .. . 9
n .........71
. 67
..... 79
irger . . . .87
.........74

R
5
20
5
15
16
16
15
10
12
12
4

H
11
29
22
20
23
22
23
17
16
5

TEAM .........660 130 191 .289
Alexis in Derby Field
LOUISVILLE, June 5-UP)-Alexis,
half of the one-two punch the East
expects to land in Saturday's Ken-
tucky Derby, took over at Churchill
Downs today when he joined some 15
other three-year olds prepping for
the $75,000 mile and one-quarter
race.
Three lightly regarded Canadian
horses, H. C. Hatch's Fair Jester and
Kenilworth Lad and Pert G. from T.
C. Graham's Kenilworth Farm, also
put in their appearance.

Pet.
.423
.363
.333
.310
.299
.291
.283
.264
.246
.216
.167

TEAMS
New York ....
Detroit ......
St. Louis .....
Chicago ......
Boston .......
Cleveland
Washington
Philadelphia

W L
..24 15
..20 15
..18 17
...19 18
....19 20
....16 19
....17 21
....15 23

Pet.
.615
.571
.514
.514
.487
.457
.447
.375

GB
2
4
4
5
6
6
8/

0 0 * Pil,,I,.

at Mfaynzard

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YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit at Cleveland, night.
Philadelphia at Boston, rain.
St. Louis at Chicago, night.
New York at Washington, night.
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Cleveland.
St. Louis at Chicago.
Philadelphia at Boston (2).
New York at Washington, night.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York .......27 14 .659 .
Pittsburgh ......23 17 .575 4
St. Louis ........23 18 .561 4
Brooklyn ........21 19 .525 5?%
Chicago ........19 18 .514 6
Cincinnati ......19 19 .500 61/
Boston ..........15 21 .4117 92
Philadelphia ....10 31 .244 17
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 4-1, Pittsburgh 0-9.
Chicago at St. Louis, rain.
Boston at Philadelphia, rain.
Boston at Philadelphia, rain.
Brooklyn at New York, incom-
plete.
TODAY'S GAMES
Boston at Philadelphia, twilight-
night.
Chicago at St. Louis, night.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, night.
j}~i 4 CeU

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