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May 20, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SV-NDAY, MAY 20, i545

TIHE MICIIGAN DAILY

Golfers Beat Ohio State

To

Avenge Only Defeat

BASEBALL ROUNDUP:
Indians Shaking Cellar;
White Sox Cling to Top Spot

Linksmen Gain Fourth Straight Win

Itakin9 the (<w'n4

Of Season Here with-11-Point Margin

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK, May 19.-Cleveland
made a bid to get out of the Ameri-
can League cellar by capturing both
ends of its twin-bill from the Phila-
delphia Athletics, 4-0 and 2-1, today.
Allie Reynolds and Steve Gromek,
who have accounted for seven of
their team's eight victories, pitched
the Indians to their double triumph.
Reynolds spaced four Athletic hits
for his third victory and his first
shut-out. He was aided greatly byl
Manager Lou Boudreau who col-
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

TEAMS W
Chicago ...........13
New York ........13
Detroit ...........12
St. Louis.........10°
Washington.......11
Boston. ..........9
Philadelphia .......9
Cleveland..........8

L
7
8
8
9
13
13
14
13

Pet.
.650
.619
.600
.526.
.458
.409
.391
.381

GB
1
2'/
4
5
5
6

YESTERDAY'S RESULT'S
Washington 6-0, Detroit 2-3.
Chicago 3, Boston 2.
Cleveland 4-2, Philadelphia. 0-1.
New York at St. Louis, night.
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Detroit (2).
Boston at Chicago (2).
New Fork at St. Louis (2).
Philadelphia at Cleveland (2).
NATIONAL LEAGUE

lected two doubles and a single and'
batted in three runs. Russ Christo-
pher of the A's was charged with
his second loss against five victories.
Gronek Wins
Gromek registered his fourth tri-
umph in the after-piece although he
was stung for 11 hits while the Tribe
made good use of its four hits off
Don Black. It was Gromek's fifth
complete game, and the third time
he held the opposition to one run,
the other victory resulting in a shut-
out.
Gromek scored the winning fun
himself after he began the fifth in-
ning with a walk. Paul O'Dea's home
run in the first inning accounted for
the Indians' first run.
Tigers Split
Hal Newhouser hurled Detroit's
seventh shut-out win of the season
to, give the Tigers a 3-0 victory and
an even split in their doubleheader
with Washington. The Senators had
taken the opener when Roger Wolff
out-pitched Paul (Dizzy) Trout, 6-2,
for his fourth triumph.
Wdlfi spaced eight hits and was
helped immeasurably by Gilberto
Torres who tripled in the eighth with
the bases loaded. Mickey Haefner,
Nats hard luck hurler, lost his fourth
game in the nightcap, his second via
the shut-out route.
Sox Win Again
The League leading Chicago White
Sox staved off a desperate ninth in-
ning uprising by the Red Sok and
defeated Boston, 3-2.
Rookie Frank Papish stepped to
the mound with the bases full and
one out in the ninth and retired two
pinch hitters to save the game for
Johnny Humphries, making his first
start for the Pale Hose.
Rain, after canceiiiig all games in
the American League for four strai-
ght days, turned on the National
League today and wiped out its en-
tire card.
Navy Wins IC 4-A
Cinder Carnival
WEST POINT, N. Y., May 19-(0P)
-Navy successfully defended its in-
tercollegiate A.A.A.A., outdoor track
and field championship today, roll-
ing up 85 3/4 points for a new meet
record with Army counting 77 1/4
tallies for second place.

By HANK MANTHO $
Daily Sports Editor
AST WEEK when Michigan was playing host to Notre Dame in a baseball
series, Michigan fans got a glimpse of Frank Gilhooley Jr., captain
and center fielder of this year's Irish nine, and though it isn't every day
that you see a father-son combination make good in the majors, unless
all indications are wrong, young Gilhooley will be sporting a big league
uniform, the same as his father did for quite a number of years.
One of the best defensive fielders in the Mid-West last year, when
he was patrolling the outer gardens as a regular for Notre Dame, Gil-
hooley has improved his batting prowess this year and is currently rated
as the team's leading hitter, and most oposing coaches give him the
nod as the outstanding ball player on the Irish team, as well as rating
him hifrh in collegiate ranks.
Frank's prep school experience consisted of varsity basketball and
baseball for three years at Toledo's Central Catholic High, from- whence
he matriculated at -Notre Dame in September of 1942. Hgwever, he
dropped out of school the following semester and didn't return again until
that fall when he had his draft status definitely cleared up. Since then,
Gilhooley was on last year's Notre Dame baseball team and also managed
to win a regular berth on this year's high-scoring quintet.
GILHOOLEY'S athletic prowess comes naturally to him, for he has been
in such an environment all of his life and was especially exposed to
baseball traditions since childhood. His father was regarded as one of the
greatest big leaguers of his day and many of his feats are still widely ac-
claimed.
The elder Gilhooley made his debut in the big leagues with the St.
Louis Cardinals in 1911. After a short stay in the minors, he was traded
to the New York Yankees in 1913 and played the outfield for them for the
next five years. And it is here that Wolverine baseball mentor, Ray Fisher,
first came in contact with Gilhooley, Sr., as he was then pitching for the
Yanks.
Frank, Sr. was traded to the Boston Red Sox in 1917 and there
became the roomate of Babe Ruth, one of the greatest and most
colorful ball players of all time. Gilhooley played with the Sox for'
four years after which he was again shipped to the minor leagues,
where he finally bowed out of professional ball in 1929, his last year as
the manager of the Jersey City ball club.
It must be a great feeling for Frank, Sr., a lover of baseball, to finally
;see his grown son rapidly approaching major league caliber and almost
ready to carry on the tradition which he himself started, and according
to various reports received, it won't be long now before young Frank will
also make his debut in the professional ranks.
E LROY HIRSCH, Michigan's only athlete able to win four varsity letters
in one year, has been offered a $9,600 contract from the Cleveland
Rams of the National Football League.
Hirsch, who just finished lengthy training and received a Lieutenant's
commission in the Marine Corps, was en route to the West Coast for assign-
ment when he received the offer from the general manager of the Rams.
Cleveland picked Hirsch in the 1945 college draft at New York last month
and the offer was based on his availability in 1946.!
Girl Crew Wins in Fl tta Finish'

enswold Gets Top1
Score for Michigant
By RUTH ELCONINt
Trouncing Ohio State yesterday,
19-8, at the University golf course,
Michigan's linksmen gained theirt
fourth consecutive triumph andr
snapped the Buckeyes' winning streak
at nine victories.
Coach Bill Barclay's charges were
cut to avenge a 15-12 setback at thec
hands of the Ohioans in an earlier
contest, their only defeat of the sea-
sen. The Wolverine golf mentor,
commenting on the contet, said the
squad dhplayed a complete reversal
of form from the previous Buckeye
tilt, and, considering the lack of
practice last week due to the heavy
and constant rains, the Maize and
Blue team played very well.
With the doubles combinations
teeing off in the morning, with three
points at stake in each match, the
Wolverines get off on the right foot
by carding two shutouts and split-
ting the third match.
Split Doubles
Michigan's twosome<, of John Tews
and John Jenswold and Bob Ernst
and Ken'Morey held their respective
opponents of Howard Baker and Dick
Barr, and John Lorms and Bob New-
ell scoreless. The other Maize and
Blue pair of Phil Marcellus and Cap-
tain Paul O'Hara divided with Dan
Rocker and Bob Kampfer.
At the end of the doubles play,
Barclay's men were out front 71/2-
Michia n State
Runners Defeat
Hoosier Squad
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., May 19-
(P)-Wayne Finkbeiner's victory in
the broad jump, the last event on
the program, brought Michigan State
College a 61%j to 6012 victory today
in a dual track meet with Indiana
University.
The Spartans, who lost an indoor
meet to the Hoosiers this season, set
the stage for their revenge victory
today by taking the mile relay in
3:27.8 to tie the score.
SIr.

K

I

I

.

11/, and held the lead throughout
the remainder of the contest.
Shooting the singles play-offs in
the' afternoon, the visitors attempted
to catch up and notch their tenth
Itraight win, but the Wolverines con-
tinued to add to their score. With
three points going for each indi-
vidual match, the Ohio club man-
aged to take 6%'72 of the 18 points.
Win Singles
Marcellus, holding the number one
spot for the Maize and Blue, shut
out Baker, 0,-O, and following him
was Tews who lost to Lorms by the
same score. Jenswold, in the number
three position for the Michigan

TEAMS W
New York ........20
Brooklyn..........17
St. Louis.........12
Boston.... ,.......10
Chicago.........10!
Pittsburgh........10
Cincinnati .........9
Philadelphia.......6

L
5
7
12
12
13
13
12.
20,

Pct.
.800
.70$
.500
.455
.435
.435
.429
.231

GB
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9
9
9
141/-

YtSTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh at New York (2),
rain.
Chicago at Brooklyn, rain.
Cincinnati at Boston, rain,
St. Louis at Philadelphia, told.
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Brooklyn (2).
Cincinnati at Boston (2).
Pittsburgh at New York (2).
St. Louis at Phiadelohia (2).

i

L(BERTY AT MAYNARD ,

BOSTON, May 19-(P)---Radcliffe
College's cinderella girl crew today
bested a straw-hatted Harvard eight
in a prankish stunt race-first water
contest between the Cambridge
neighbors-winning by 3 seconds in a
flutter finish.
The Harvardians had a flutter of
amnesia, or perhaps chivalry, mis-
judged the finish line, and stopped
racing with 50 yards to go.
Radcliffe, co-captained by titian-
haired twin sisters Jane and Dorothy
Driscoll, Brookline, spurted on, fin-
ishing the half mile Charles River
course winner by half a length in
4:8. Harvard's time was 4:11.

The exuberant winners promptly
tossed their shirts toward Harvard's
boat, as co-captain Dorothy shouted:
"Don't get excited. We have other
shirts on underneath."
Both contestants were impeded by
an uninvited M.I.T. crew, female
impersonators in curly wigs and yel -
low jerseys.
The harassed judges, who had to
argue their way onto their launch
after being told there was no room
for them, originally gave the victory
to Harvard. Back on shore, they
reversed the decision.
"We've been thinking things over,"
said one.

WHITE CANE WEEK

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ANN ARBOR, MUST BE
A SPONGE. That is what
the students are beginning
to believe when they see
nothing but rain, rain and
more rain day after day.
Some say they can't re-
member what the sun looks
like. Others claim that
there have been only two
nice days (critera for a
nice day is that it doesn't
rain more than 4 inches)
in the last month. V-12
trainees enjoy the rain
especially when a heavy
downpour comes on Wed-
nesday afternoons. Reas-
on: they don't have to
drill But the University
students will agree that
they have had enough. The
Daily has jokingly stated
that it will put out arn Ex-
tra the first day it stops
raining and that the sun
shines!
THE CAMPUS SPIRIT
that pitted sophomore
against freshman for the
hannr of h ic in Blank,

ANN ARBOR, MICH

To the winners will go the
prestige attached to de-
feating their traditional
class rivals in athletic
pummeling. Class Games
is in no way connected
with the Black Fridays
whose memories still live
in Union posters, but it
is the direct outgrowth of
that old Michigan class
rivalry. Until it was ruled
out by the Regents as be-
ing dangerous to the phy-
sical well-being of Univer-
sity students, Black Fri-
day was the climax of
frosh-soph antagonism.
After many proclamations
asserting the mental and
moral lethargy of the soph-
omores, the freshmen
would raise a flag telling
the sophs exactly where
they could go. If the fros :.
succeeded in keeping the
flag up, they won the right
to remove their pots. If
not, they were to be worn
until the next commence-
ment. The going got rough
mcn snnhnmorv trier tn

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x

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All of a sudden your heart sings of summer .
you're in the mood for sunlight colors . . New,
vibrant pastels or blazin', brazin' whites. So, we
hnve rvavr for nvi r seletion n ion oof hiliratinn

FREEDOM BEGINS--The historic moment when General Douglas Mac-
Arthur turned over the government of the Philippine Commonwealth to
President Sergio Osmena at Malacanan Palace in Manila after hard fought
uattles by American soldiers equipped with armament partly supplied with
War Bond dollars. President Osmena is, seen delivering his acceltance
speech, dressed in shirt and trousers of G.I. vintage, also partly supplied by
War Bond dolrars.-Army Sikual Corns Photo.

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