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May 19, 1945 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FOUR

THE MICHIGAN AILY

SATI

Y, MAY

Car Makers Authorized
To Design New Autos
Companies To Assign One Per Cent of
Employment for Post War Production
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, May 18--Another move looking to the production of entirely
new post war model automobiles was taken today when the major car
makers in the Detroit area were authorized to assign a limited number of
engineers and technicians to the designing of the vehicles.
Edward L. Cushman, state director of the War Manpower Commission,
said the companies could use up to one per cent of their total employment
for the development of wholly new models.
Today's action differs from that taken last September in that the
car manufacturers at that time were authorized to use a limited number of

Highlights
On Campus...
Sundaram Will Visit 'U'
Prof. M. S. Sundaram, educational
liaisan officer from India, will visit
the University from Tuesday to Fri-
day to confer with faculty members
and inspect facilities open to for-
eign students.
- Prof. Sundaram will meet with the
20 or more Indian students on cam-

--- i ,

Services Will

Honor Nis1i in
Armed Forces
Memorial services, sponsored by
the Nisei Club of Ann Arbor and
honoring the Americans of Japanese
ancestry from Ann Arbor in the
armed forces, will be held at 8 p.m.
EWT (7 p.m. CWT) tomorrow in the
.first Methodist Church.
The program will present candle-
light services honoring the 150 men
from this area, six of whom have
been killed in action, and will bel
dedicated to the 18,000 Nisei now on
the battlefronts. According to a
recent War Department announce-
ment, more than one third of this
number volunteered for service.
Col. R. C. Miller, U.S. Army Area
Commandant, will speak, and the
Rev. Chester H. Loucks of the First
Baptist Church is to conduct the
services. Miss Masaka Ono will be
the soloist.
The sermon is to be preached by
the Rev. William P. Lemon of the
Presbyterian Church and the Rev.
Henry L. Pickerill will lead the pray-
ers.
McClusky Will
Speak at Church
Dr. Howard Y. McClusky, profes-
sor of educational psychology, will
discuss "Work Experiences for Chil-
dren" at a meeting of the Adult
Study Group of the First Unitarian
Church at 10 a.m. EWT (9 CWT)
tomorrow.
Mrs. C. J. Barclay will lead the
discussion following Dr. McClusky's
talk.
Dr. Clark Trow, Miss Edith Bader,
and Dean James B. Edmonson will
be the speakers for the following
Sundays. the public is cordially in-
vited to attend these meetings which
will complete the Adult Study Pro-
gram at the Unitarian Church this
spring.
OPA Contianation
Essential, -Brown
LANSING, May 18-(/P)-A contin-
uation of the Office of Price Admin-
istration, with all controls intact, is
"absolutely necessary" Prentiss M.
Brown, former national OPA admin-
istrator and now chairman of thel
board of the Detroit Edison Company,
said today.
Speaking before theLansing Rot-
ary Club, Brown declared "we now
have in the war agencies in Washing-
ton a system of non-partisan admin-
istration that is doing the greatest
good for the greatest number of
people in this country."
MOSELEY TYPEWRITER
AND SUPPLY CO.
114 SOUTH FOURTH AVE.
Complete Typewriter Service
Phone 5888

technicians only for "face-lifting"
the 1942 models, the last produced
by the industry.
Not Expected This Year
Informed industry circles em-1
pha sized that today's action did not
mean that the cars expected to come
from the assembly lines this year
will be entirely re-designed models.
At least a year is required to design
and bring a new model to the pro-
duction stage.
Through the application of chang-
ed radiator grilles, hood and fender
design, the cars expected this year
will look different from the 1942
models, but functionally they will be
much the same.
Material Restrictions Lifted
Assignment of engineers and tech-
nicians to the task of designing en-
tirely new models was made possible
by the lifting of restrictions on the
use of experimental material. Here-
tofore each company was limited to
the expenditure of $5,000 a month
for such material, which one indu-
stry spokesman said was "like water-
ing an elephant with a medicine
dropper."
The car manufacturers now may
spend whatever amount they choose
on the purchase of experimental ma-
terials provided it is available.
Heaviest Production To Come
Industry experts here commenting
on the anticipated authorization to
produce 200,000 passenger cars dur-
ing the latter part of this year em-
phasized that this program would
merely be a start toward what prob-
ably will be three or more years of
the heaviest volume in the industry's
history.
They pointed out that in the early
part of 1941, last full year of pro-
duction, the assembly plants turned
out more than 200,000 cars in two
weeks.
Guidance To Be
Given Veterans
A Guidance Center for veterans
has been established at the Psycho-
logical Clinic, 1027 E. Huron.
The Center, under the auspices of
the Veterans Administration, will deal
with the educational needs of Univer-
sity veterans, and with related prob-
lems. Previously, veterans had to go
to Dearborn for this service. H. H.
Fischer is in charge of the Center.

pus, and will have charge of the
placement and supervision of ap-
proximately 200 students to come to
the United States from India next
year.
* * *
Class To Review Piuy .
Students in Speech 163 will re-
view Shakespeare's "The Merchant
of Venice" at 8 p. n. Tuesday in
room 4203, Angell. Hall.
The platform acting and narra-
tive method will be used. All per-
sons interested are invited.
.* * * '
Co-op Will Hold Picnic. . .
Stevens Cooperative House will
hold a picnic and weenie roast at
2 p.m. EWT (2 p.m. CWT) Sunday,
May 27, on the Island.
All members of the Inter-Coopera-
tive Ccuncil and their friends have
been invited to attend.
In case of rain the weenie roast
will be held at Stevens House, 816
Forest.
* * *
Club Schedules Picnic . .
All members of the College of
Pharmacy are invited to attend the
Prescott Club picnic from 5 to 7
p. m. EWT (4 to 6 p. m. CWT) to-
morrow at the Island.
Those wishing to go should meet
between 4:15 and 4:30 p. m. EWT
(3:15 p. m. CWT) at the Chem-
istry Building. Anyone planning to
attend should sign the bulletin out-
side the pharmacy office in the
Chemistry Building.
C " E ' ' " " '* "* *
Anne Maloney To Speak
Anne Maloney will give a talk on
"William Conrad Roentgen"-discov-
erer of x-rays, at a meeting of the
Prescott Club at 7:15 p. m. EWT
(6:15 CWT) Tuesday in Rm. 300
Chemistry Building.
* * *
Stockwell Open House ...
Coeds of Stockwell Hall will be
en hand from 2 to 5 p.m. today to
welcome all servicemen and vet-
erans on campus to their open
house.
There will be dancing on the
terrace, group singing, ping pong
and games in the recreation room,
and refreshments for all.
* * *
Littell To Review Book.,
"The Predicament of Modern Man"
by D. Elton Trueblood will be review-
ed by Franklin H. Littell, Student Re-
ligious Association director, at 12:15
p. m. EWT (11:15 a. m. CWT) to-
day at Lane Hall.

Foreign Student
Will Be Subject
Of Conference
Faculty Members To
Attend Lansing Meeting
Dean Joseph A. Bursley, Assistant
Dean Peter Okkelberg and Dr. Esson
M. Gale, Robert B. Klinger and Sar-
ah Grollman, of the International
Center, will take part in a conference
on educational problems of Michi-
gan's 600 foreign students Wednes-
day at Michigan State College inj
Lansing.
Dean Emmons To Preside
Dean Lloyd C. Emmons, of Michi-
gan State College, will preside over!
the one-day informal meeting. Dr.
Eugene B. Elliott, state superinten-
dent of public instruction will deliver
the opening address on "The Im-
portance of Foreign Students," and
Miss Grollman will speak on teach-
ing English to foreign students.
Dr. Gale To Speak
"What Lies Ahead in Education
of Foreign Students" will be the topic
of Dr. Gale. Malcolm Bingay, of the
Detroit Free Press, will discuss his
recent trip to Europe.
The conference is sponsored by the
department of public instruction.
Dorr To Speak ott
Dwnbarton Oaks
Prof. Harold M. Dorr of the poli-
tical science department will address
the University of Michigan Club of
St. Claire today on "Dumbarton Oaks
and After."
Robert O. Morgan, assistant gen-
eral secretary of the Alumni Associa-
tion, will discuss alumni activities.
INVEST IN VICTORY

Campaign To End with
Over-the-Top Party
A United Jewish Appeal Clean-up
campaign to be held Monday through
Saturday of next week will culminate
in an Over-the-Top party Saturday
night at the Hillel Foundation.
The purpose of tie Clean-up drive
is to fill the $2,590 sturdent quota for

United Jewish Appeal Drive
To Be Finished Next Week

Beryle Walters, student director in
charge said.
Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen, Founda-
4ion director explained the purpose
of the campaign. 6V-E Day found
1,500,000 destitute Jews in Europe.
Thousands of these people had been
in hiding for years, and were able
to see the sunshine again only when
the Nazi forces were defeated.
"The funds we are contributing to
the United Jewish Appeal will open
a tremendous flow of food, clothing
and medicine to these people. It
will also eventually help thousands
of them, driven by hatred and per-
secution from their native lands, to
make their way to Palestine where
their shattered lives and spirits can
be rebuilt and restored."
Alumni Officers
To Meet Today
The Executive Committee of the
Alumni Association's Board of Di-
rectors will meet at 11:00 a. m. EWT
(10:00 a. m. CWT) today in Presi-
dent Ruthven's office.
The group will consider the new
year's budget and other business
items and prepare for the meeting
of the board on June 22.
The committee is composed of
Walter G. Kirkbride, president of the
board; Glen Coulter of Detroit,
Christian F. Matthews of Mt. Clem-
ens; President Alexander Ruthven;
Shirley W. Smith, former Vice-Presi-
dent of the University; Dean James
B. Edmonson of the School of' Edu-
cation, and Prof. Carl G. Brandt of
the Engineering English department.

NIGHT
andl
DAY

*

_

. ,r

DELIGHTFUL,
DELICIOUS,
DELECTABLE .
is this smooth Tish ice cream
with thick creamy chocolate
sauce. You can get it at the
THOMPSON Tasty lee Cream
Soda Fountain.

'4

SI

UJA WILL HELP HIM-Herman
Iwanir, 15, one of the 110 Jews still
alive of the 8,00 who were impris-
oned in the Brezlaun death camp,
will receive relief through funds
collected in the United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign.
the nation-wide United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign, which as yet has not
been reached. However, a good per-
centage of our aim has been realized,

*

A

;A

0

II

CMET TO

C /

FLYIN
THR U THE AIR..
may be very exciting, but you'll
reach your destination faster
on a bicycle from the CAMPUS
BIKE SHOP.

*

A
y ~'

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
1432 Washtenaw Ave.

CHURCH

AROUND THE CLOCK WITH WPAG

SATC., MAY 19
Eastern War Tune
7:00-News.
7:05-Morning Round-Up,
7:30-Musical Reveille.
7:50-Bouquet for Today.
8:00-News.,
8:15-1050 Club.
9:00-News.
9:05-Goodyear's MusicBox
9:30-Community Calendar
9:45-Lean Back & Listen.
10:00-News.
10:05-David Rose & Orch.
10:15-what Do You Know.
10:30-Broadway Melodies.
10:40-women Today.
10:45-waltz Time,

I1 :00-News.
11:05-Children's Party.
11:30-Farm & Home Hour.
12:00-News.
12:15-Merle Pitt,
12:30-Trading Post.
12:45-Luncheon Melodles.
1:00-News.
1:05JHollywood Reporter.
1:15-U. of M.
1:30-Mitch Ayres.
1:45-Hanna & Bosnick.
2:00-News.
2:05-John Kirby.
2:15-Jerry Wald.
2:45-Baseball Brev.
2:55-Baseball (Wash at
Det.)

5:00-News.
5:05--Campus Ballrooim.
5:45-Sports Review.
6:00-News.
6:15-Albert wallace.
6:30-Telephone Quiz.
6:45-Piano Interlude.
6:55-Flashes From Life.
7:00-News. '
7:15-Fireside Harmonies.
7:25-Band of the Week.
7:30-Evening Serenade.
8 :00-News.
8:05--Dance Time.
6:15-Put & Take It.
11:30-Your American M"i-
sic.

"

William P. Lemon, D. D. James Van Pernis,
Ministers
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Organist and Di-
rector of Music.
E. Gertrude Campbell, Director of Religious
Education.
9:30 A. M.: Church School Intermediate, Sen-
ior and Adult Department.
10:20 A. M.: Junior Department.
10:45 A. M.: Nursery, Beginner and Primary
Department.
10:45 A. M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Dr.
Lemon, "Life's Present Tense."
5:00 P. M.: Westminster Guild discussion on
"The Bible" by Mr. Van Pernis. Supper fol-
lows.1
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
Seis of Study Chasses:
Every Thursday night, at 8:00 in the Michigan
League. Conducted by S, 11. Wylie.
The public is cordially invited.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 East Huron
Rev, C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counselor
Ruth McMaster, Associate Student Counselor
Roger Williams Guild House. 502 East Huron
Saturday, May 19-
7:10 P.M.: Choir practice in the Church.
Sunday, May 20-
10:00 A.M.: Study Class, Integration of Per-
sonality.
11:00 A.M.: Worship Service, "The Unity of the
Spirit." Rev. Loucks.
5:00 P.M.: Prof. Henry Sanders will speak to
the Roger Williams Guild on "The New Test-
ament Scripture" and will show slides.
6:00 P.M.: Cost supper,
GRACE BIBLE FELLOWSHIP
Masonic Temple, 327 South Fourth Ave.
Har iold J. DeVries, Pastor
10:00 A.M.: University Bible Class, Ted Groes=
beck, leader.
11:00 AM.: Morning Worship Service. Sermon
by the pastor. '
6:45 P.M.: Youth Forum.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
Edward If Redman, Minister
Miss Janet Wilson, Organist.
Mrs. Claude Winder, Church School Supt.
(Eastern War Time)
10:00 A.M.: Unitarian-Friends' Church School,
10:00 A.M.: Adult Study Group. Prof. Howard
McCluskey will speak on "Work Experience
for Young People."
11:00 A.M.: Unitarian High School group.
11:00 A.M.: Service of Worship. 120th Anni-
versary of the American Unitarian Assn.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION .
sponsored jointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches
Zion Lutheran Church-
E. Washington at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service & Confirmation,
Sermon by Rev. E. C. Stellhorn
Trinity Lutheran Church-
E. William St. at S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service & Confirmation,
Sermon by Rev. H. O. Yoder.
Lutheran Student Association-
309 E. Washington St.
5:00 P.M.: Program and Election of Officers,
Dr. C LT. Wolf former Army Chanlain and

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Director of Student Work: Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant Director: Miss Bobbie Simonton
Choir'Director: Leonard V. Meretta
Organist: Howard R. Chase
(Eastern War Time)
9:30 A.M.: Church School, Junior and Inter-
mediate departments.
10:30 A.M.: Primary and Kindergarten Depts.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will preach
on "Dogmas of the Quiet Past."
5:00 P.M.: Congregational - Disciples Student
Guild will meet in the Church. Following
supper there will be Guild Elections. Russell
Fuller will lead the closing worship service.
5:30 P.M.: Ariston League will meet at Pilgrim
Hall. Mr. Howard Holland of the University
High School will speak on "Youth, Religion
and the Post War World." Devotions will be
by Don Yates.
ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division apt Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis. D.D., Rector
The Rev. A. Shrady Hill, Curate.
8:00 A. M.: Holy Communion (Whitsunday
Corporate Communion of Young People).
11:00 A. M.: Holy Communion and Sermon by
Dr. Lewis.
11:00 A. M.: Junior Church.
6:00 P. M.: H-Square Club, Page Hall.
6:00 P. M.: There will be no meeting of the
Canterbury Club at the Student Center Sun-
day night because of the Pine Lake Confer-
ence.
During the Week
Tuesday, 10:00 A. M.: Holy Communion, War
Shrine.
Wednesday, 7:15 A. M.: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by breakfast at the Student Center.
Reservations, 5790).
,Friday, 4:00-6:00 P. M.: Open House, Student
Center (408 Lawrence).
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State
Min-isters:, Dr. Jam es Brett Kenna
Rev, Ralphr Gordon Dunlop
Music: Hardin Van Deursen. Director
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Student class, Wesley Foundation
Lounge.
10:40 A.M.: Church School for children - Nur-
sery through the sixth grade.
10:40 A.M.: Worship Service. Rev. Dunlop's ser-
mon topic is "The Living Gift."
5:00 P.M.: Wesleyan Guild for College - age
young people. Prof. Kenneth G. Hance will
lead a panel discussion on "China Looks at
America." Chinese and American students
will participate.
7:30 P.M.: Young Married People's Discussion
Group.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
May 20: Mortals and Immortals.
10:30 A.M.,: Lesson sermon.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00 P. M. Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
This church maintains a free Reading Room
at 706 Wolverine Bldg., Washington at Fourth
which is open daily except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Here the Bible
and Christian Science literature including all of
Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy's works may be read,
borrowed or purchased.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue

FOR TRULY
SMOOTH BEER . *

and wine drop in at the YOU
AND I BAR, 110 East Huron.
These . choice beverages are
served throughout the day.
BUT YOU CAN
BET
on the food at LEO PING'S.
Whether you order a snack or
a full dinner the same high
quality prevails..

A

I

FOR TWO WEEKS:

BURR PAT RS & AUL CO.
FRATERNITY JEWELERS AT MICHIGAN
will be open
from 1 P.M. to 5:30 P.M. Only

U.S. Supports...
(Continued from Page 1)
of the trusteeship question be amend-
ed to list "independence" as one of
the direct objectives of the projected
new system.
The Chinese offered yesterday a
compromise amendment which would
list both "self government" and "in-
dependence" as objectives.
"We point to the Philippines as a
concrete example of U. S. policy,"
Stettinius stated.

r"',

I

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,. .

/

.'

I! 1209 South University

Ruth Ann Oakes. Mgr,

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atWO

'-- -®--- -

r

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r° -
w y'

C'tierihe~iI ne4e,

-1

YOU CAN HOOK
YOURSELF.
to a terrific evening at SOPH
MUSIC BAR tonight. There'll
be dancing, a movie, refresh-
ments, and lots of entertain-
ment. See you there!

RECOLLECTIONS OF DINNERS in

the comfortuie,

dignified atmosphere of the Allenel dining room will
remain with you always. Genial hospitality, good food,

P!'i!!V °A!'iI IL: t°AMfI!/eA tall MaA Mf- A# lAA All---l 4- -l. l.. ,.a

1111

I

I I I

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