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May 09, 1945 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-09

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNtSDA1~, ~AY 9, 194~

Church Services End YEDay Observances
Knowledge That War Is
Half Won Dampens Joy5...
+ 4
Michigan Cities Have Quiet Demonstrations;:
'Brown-Out' Lifted Across Entire Country

CHINESE EDUCATOR:
Dr. ChiangMonlin Notes
Un ivers ity Sim ilarities

4,

With religious services, in most
communities, Michigan Tuesday
night brought to a close a sporadic,
though somewhat prolonged, obser-
vance hailing the cessation of hos-
tilities in Europe.
Lifting of the "brown-out", a war-
Health Group

Sets Medicai
SPlas, Goals

Medical care of veterans, college
physical education programs of the
future, and the necessity of contin-
ued vigilance in searching for tuber-
culosis in students were the topics
discussed by the Council of the Amer-
ican Student Health Association
which met at the University of Min-
nesota last week, Dr. Warren E. For-
sythe, Health Service Director, said
yesterday.
Dr. Forsythe, who just returned
from this two-day business meeting
of the association, said that this year
because of traveling conditions only
the 12 members of the council met,
instead of all of the members of the
organization.
During the discussion of future
physical education programs for col-
leges, Dr. Forsythe said, it was point-
ed out that such programs could not
be expected to correct many of the
physical defects responsible for the
disqualification for military service
of one-third of our nation's young
men. That problem will have- to be
dealt with by more specific medical
care started early in life, the council
concluded.
h~

time fuel-saving measure, permitted
the use of outdoor lighting in show
windows, outdoor advertising signs
and theater marquees for the first
time since the German offensive last
winter.
No Jubilation
Realization that the war was only
half won, however, put a damper on
celebrations, making them a far cry
from those which marked the end of
the first World War 27 years ago. In
most cases the prevailing spirit was
one of rededication rather than jubi-
lation.
A 24-hour ban on the sale of in-I
toxicating beverages and government
requests for uninterrupted war pro-
duction, combined with the previous
unofficial announcement of German
surrender, reduced the scale of dem-
onstrations in most cities.
In Detroit and several other of the
state's industrial centers, however,
intermittent walkouts by celebrating
workers caused several plants to shut
down for the day. Some others were
closed by advance arrangement.
Listen to President
An estimated 5,000 persons gath-
ered in Cadillac Square near the
Detroit city hall to hear the broad-
cast by President Truman and a plea
by Brig. -Gen.A.dB. Quinton, Chief of
the Detroit Ordnance District, for
redoubled efforts for the defeat of
Japan. Parades, whether pre-ar-
ranged or spontaneous, marked the
occasion in several other cities.
Classes at Michigan State College
were dismissed, but most public
schools remained open and held spe-
cial victory and prayer services.
Stores and offices were closed in
nearly every community.
Hear Preclamation
Wounded soldiers at Percy Jones
Hospital in Battle Creek grouped a-
round radios to hear the President's
proclamation. Those who had fought
in the European theater were joking-
ly dubbed "has beens" by Pacific vet-
terans. Memorial services were sched-
uled for all Percy Jones installations.

WOUNDED VETS READ OF SURRENDER--These soldiers who were wounded in action overseas read of
the surrender of Germany in a newspaper extra a t Lawson General Hospital at Atlanta, Ga. Left to
right are: Sgt. J. B. Coursey, Lakeland, Fla., PFC DeWitt Pope, Canton, Ga.; Pvt. Carl E. Cauley,
Douglas, Ga.; Pvt. Charles De Anglis, (seated in wheel chair) Boston, Mass.; PFC Douglas Melloan, Louis-'
ville, Ky.; Pvt. James McLemore, Morton, Mass.; an d Pvt. Ernest Tolbert, Atlanta, Ga.
-A. P. Wirephoto

VCA MPUS HIG HLIG HTSs

Hungry?
CHATTERBOX
800 SOUTH STATE

Movies To Be Shown .. .
The School of Education will show
movies today and tomorrow at 3 p.m.
EWT (2 p.m. CWT) in the Univer-
sity High School auditorium.
"Out of the Night" and "Of Pups
and Puzzles" will be shown today.
"The Soviet School Child" will be
shown Thursday. All University stu-
dents who are interested are invited
to attend.
IRA Meets Tonight ...
The Inter-Racial Association will
hold a business meeting at 7:30 p.m.
EWT (6:36 p.m. CWT) tody in the
Union.
Committee heads will report on
the racial injustice case of Mrs. Recy
Burgess Will
Speak Today
"The Effect of War on Family
Patterns" will be the subject of a
lecture by Dr. Ernest W. Burgess,
professor of sociology at the Univer-
sity of Chicago, at 8 p.m. EWT (7
p.m. CWT) today in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Though a bachelor himself, Dr.
Burgess. author of "Predicting Suc-
cess in Marriage", is considered one
of the country's foremost authorities
on marriage and home life.
The lecture is jointly sponsored by
the Ann Arbor Adult Education Com-
mittee. the Ann Arbor Council of
Chum ches, the student Religious As-
seciation, and the Counselor in Re-
ligious Education.

Taylor, on Federal aid to higher edu-I
cation, and on racial discrimination 1
in town barber shops.
Markham To Speak...
"Post-War Prospects in the Bal-
kans" will be the topic of an address
to be delivered by Reuben H. Mark-
ham, foreign correspondent for the
Christian Science Monitor, at 8 p.m.
EWT (7 p.m. CWT) tomorrow in tine
Rackham Amphitheater.
Markham has spent 25 years inl
Europe. His lecture is sponsored by
the socioiogy de artment; and will
be open to the public.
'U' Aluni To Meet .
Former Senhtor Prentiss A. Brown,
with the Detroit Edison, will address
the University of Michigan Club of
Ferndale-Pleasant Ridge at its an-
nual banquet today.
T. Hawley Tapping, general secre-
tary of Alumni Association, and Rob-
ert 0. Morgan, sec'retary of the Class
Officers Council, will attend the al-
umni meeting.
Ii Dice's Wife, Children
Taken into allied Custody
WITH THE U.S. FIFTH ARMY AT
THE ITALIAN-AUSTRIAN FRON-,
TIER, May 8.-(P-Signora Rachele
Mussolini, widow of Il Duce, was tak-
en into custody five days ago some-
where in northern Italy, it was learn-
ed tonight.

Hindustani To
e i
Give r1aniatie,7
The University Hindustan Associa-
tion, student organization of Indian
students and friends of India, will
present a program at 8 p. m. EWT
(7 p. m. CWT), May 23 in the Lydia
.Mendelssohn Theatre. I
Purpose of the entertainment will
be to bring the American people an
idea of the Indian culture and wayf
of life. George Hall, assistant direct-
or of the International Center, re-
ported. Classical and folk dances,
musical numbers and a skit depicting
a typical gathering in India have been
planned.
An address by Dr. Haridas Muz-
umdar, Indian lecturer, author and
professor, will highlight the pro-
gram.
Tickets may be obtained at the In-
ternational Center. or from Indian
students -on campus.
No Change in Plans
For Medical School
Rumors that the University Medi-
cal School will go on a two-term year
instead of the present accelerated
three-term program are unfounded,
Dr. Franklin D. Johnston, Medical
School secretary said yesterday.
The faculty of the school is, how-
ever, in favor of the change, but be-
cause of the large number of Army
and Navy students attending, it would
be impossible to alter the program,
Dr. Johnston added.

"The differences between Chinese
and American universities is no great-
er than the differences existing be-
tween individual state universities in
this country, Dr. Chiang Monlin, pres-
ident of the Provisional National Uni-
versity of China,.stated in an inter-
view Monday.
"Since 1918," Dr. Chiang said,
"our universities have been modeled
after yours in organization and
admnistration." The most im-
portant difference between Chinese
and American students, he pointed
out, is that the Chinese students
are much poorer. Any qualified
student from occupied China may
go to college at government ex-
pense, Dr. Chiang explained. "Stu-
dents come to us through the Japa-
nese lines disguised and without
money," he said.
Scholarships are also available to
students in Free China, Dr. Chiang
added, although not in such great
numbers. Two-thirds of the student
body must enter on certificates from
high schools as well as by passing
the qualifying examination, he said.
The remaining third, he continued,
are accepted on the basis of the exam
results alone.
Dr. Chiang attributes the enroll-
ment increase during the war to the
fact that universities have been forc-
ed to move into the interior and
thus are able toreach students who
would not be able to come to the
coast.
Commenting on the number of
Chinese students on campus, the
eminent scholar explained that
they were sent to American colleges
either at the expense of the gov-
For Veterans
Living Quarters Are
Paramount Problem
LANSING, May 8-(/P)-The State
Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is
prepared to handle the estimated
80,000 Michigan men among the
2,000,000 American soldiers expected
to be discharged now the war in Eu-
rope is completed.
Col. Philip C. Pack, OVA Director,
said, "The discharge of 2,000,000 men
will give us a preliminary test of the
efficiency of our organization. We
will get about 80,000, if past propor-
tions hold true, and that won't be so
fast that we would be thrown out of
gear."
Pack said the problem of living
quarters for discharged servicemen
will be the first big problem
Final Ruthven Tea
Will Be Given Today
Seniors are asked to come to the
last Ruthven Tea to be held this
afternoon from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m.
EWT (3 p. M. to 5 p. m. CWT) at
the home of President Ruthven.
All students will be welcome at the
tea. Guests of honor for the after-
noon are Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha
Omicron Pi, Muriel Lester House,
Roachdale House, Tappan House,
Washtenaw House, White House,
Woodlawn House, Oakwood House,
and Company A in the East Quad.
Special, emphasis has been added
to the invitation, since this is the last
tea of the year and the only chance
for seniors to attend.
- - _ . . . . .. . ._ .. .

ernment or by private means. "In
either case, however," he remarked,
"they are required to pass an ex-
amination in order to obtain a.
passport."
Asked if the students are consid-
ered "slackers" by any of the people
because they are not actively en-
gaged in fighting the Japs, Dr. Chiang
answered that China can only nain-
tain an army of 3,000,000 out of a
population of 300,000,000.
"There are many Communist sym-
pathizers among our students," he
said, "but they are only parlor com-
munists." "Perhaps when they grow
older," he added, "they will transform
their ideas into action, but young
men are so changeable,"
Joyful at the news of the Nazi
collapse, Dr. Chiang stated that
although at first the United States
had underestimated the Japs, now
she was overestimating them. 'De-
ducting the time necessary to trans-
port troops to the East" continued
Chiang, who has a son with the
American-Chinese army in India,
"the war should be over within a
year or so." "The Japs only occupy
lines and points," he said, "not
the surface."

I1

I

NEED A VACATION?
TAKE IT ON THE INSTALLMENT PLAN
GO INTO THE COUNTRY!

PACK A LUNCH -
TAKE A BOOK -
TAKE A BLANKET ---
We'll furnish the Bikes, Basket,
also help plan your route.
$1.00 ALL DAY

0.2 .

From the celebrated Novel by
E R NEST H E MINGWAYf
GARY COOPER
INGRID BERGMAN
WAR BONDS ISSUED HERE
DAY OR NIGHT
Continuous from 1 P.M.
Shows at 1-3:35-6:20-9:05 P.M.
Coming Thursday
"HIGH
POWERED"

CAMPUS BIKE SHOP
25c An Hour $1.00 All Day

U w

CLASSIFIED ADVEurSING

LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Last Thursday, a bunch of
keys between Chemistry and E.
Engineering Building. Call 4121,1
Qxt. 460.
LOST: SMALL BROWN GABAR-
DINE PURSE IN YELLOW CAB
OR VICINITY OF E. JEFFER-
SON. REWARD. CALL 2-2868.
LOST: Alpha Omega fraternity key
inscribed MJK. Call Dental School
or 3054.
LOST-Woman's sorority ring-gold
with onyx. Call Katie 7695 or
23159.
LOST: Green wallet with initials
R. M. inside. Reward. Call Ray
McGarry. 6061.
LOST: Girls bicycle, white trimming,
white handle bar grips. Black bal-
loon tires. Dixi Flyer Wheeling
Cycle Works. Reward. Call 2-4514.
GLASSES, pink tortoise shell; semi-
harlequin. Between Daily and 328
E. William.-Call Betty Roth 2-3790.
OPERA GLASSES in black leather
case. Lost in or near Hill auditor-
ium. Call 6768. Ask for Kenneth.
Reward.

LOST: Kappa Kappa Gamma key.
Inscribed "Margaret J. Allen" on
back. Reward. Call 2-4143.
HELP WANTED
WAITERS AND WAITRESSES
WANTED! University Grill, 615
East William. Excellent arrange-
ment for meals.
WANTED: Boy to help another boy
in small league house. Easy work
and good pay. Telephone 4701.
HELP WANTED: Capable and reli-
able young man, evenings and Sun-
days. Pay as much as $35.00 per
week. Call 8111. Mr. Avsharian.
FOR RENT
3-ROOM furnished apartment. Re-
frigerator, electricity and gas fur-
nished. Also kitchen utensils avail-
able June 1. Phone 8668.
FOR SALE
FULL Dress Suit for sale, size 37.
Excellent condition. Phone 22900.
Inquire 514 E. Liberty.
MISCELLANEOUS
ADVICE TO THE LOVELORN: Send
your distressing problems to Uncle
Freddie, 315 Winchell, West Quad.

ENDING TODAY

-wde *. ph-

........:.
c?

Come in and select
GRADUATION

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