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May 04, 1945 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PArGESU

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRa .-:L; evil a i, 1 3 .

Vets Will Be
Offered Night
Art Courses
Dean Bennett Is Back
From Conference
Plans for a post-war achitecture
program for veterans were discussed
at the limited annual meeting of the
Association of Collegiate Schools of
Architecture last week in Atlantic
City, N. J., Dean Wells I. Bennett of
the School of Architecture and De-
sign said.
Although the Army has made no
definite statement yet, Dean Bennett,'
retiring president of the association,
stated that part time and accelerated
courses are suggested. Colleges and
universities in the larger cities are
going to run special night courses so
that veterans may hold jobs and still
continue their education, he said.
Columbia is planning a night curricu-
lum, and the University is considering
extension courses in Detroit.
May Plan Veteran Program-
In-service programs for veterans'
who will be stationed abroad in the
army of occupation may also be
worked out, Dean Bennett said. These
men will be idle and anxious to con-
tinue their education, and architec-
ture students will be especially inter-
ested in tours of Europe, he said. In-
structors would be enlisted from those
now in the Army and from older
students qualified to teach.
Dean Bennett pointed out that the
post-war demand for architects will
be tremendous, for the demand now
cannot be supplied.
To Set Up Research
Plans to set up a foundation for
research in architecture were also
made at the meeting, Dean Bennett
said. Modern technology was ac-
cented, he said, and visual education
as developed in Army training pro-
grams was discussed. He pointed
out that Army methods of using films
and models would probably come into
regular use.
Prof. Loring Provine, head of the
School of Architecture at the Uhi-
versity of Illinois, will replace Dean
Bennett as president.
Competition for
Awards Opens
In Art School
Two scholarship competitions in
the College of Architecture and De-
sign have been announced by Dean
Wells I. Bennett.
The Arthur C. Tagge scholarship
are being offered for the second year
to advanced students in the Colleg
of Architecture and Design who hav
been in residence one semester. Twc
awards of $325 each will be made
for 1945-1946. These awards, Dean
Bennett said, are based upon high
scholastic attainment and will be
made after the records are completed
in June.
The Jane Higbie award of $50 is
open to underclassmen of the coliege
and is to be made for general prom-
ise as well as scholarship. This award
is to encourage originality and ex-
cellence in workmanship, Dean Ben-
nett said. It is made annually by
Prof. and Mrs. H. H. Higbie as a
memorial to their daughter Jane
who was a student in the art school.
Students in the College of Archi-
tecture and Design are eligible for
these awards and should make ap-
plication for them before June 1 in
Rm. 207, Architecture Building, Dean

Bennett urged.
Last year the Tagge scholarships{
were awarded to Charles Moore of
the architecture school and to Helen
Johnston of the design school.
Chiang Monlin
To Talk Monday
Dr. Chiang Monlin, former Minis-
ter of Education for the Chinese gov-
ernment and now president of the
Provisional National University of
China, will speak on the topic "Some
Recent Political Developments in
China" at 3:15 p.m. EWT (2:15 p.m.
CWT) Monday in the Rackham Am-
phitheater.
In the United States as the chief
delegate to the Pacific Relations Con-
ference Dr. Chiang will speak under
the auspices of the Department of
Oriental Languages and Literatures.
The lecture will be open to the public.
BUY WAR BONDS

PAY CUT PROTESTED:
R. J. Thomas Demands Wage
Floor To Remedy Time Cut

ASSOCIATED PRESS

POCOTURE

By The Associated Press
DETROIT, May 3.-Asserting that
"the time to act is now here," R. J.
Thomas, President of the United
Automobile Workers (CIO), called to-
day for a review and revision of war-
time wage policies.
Thomas said at a press conference
that members of the National War,
Labor Board were generally agreed
that the wage structure would need
revision after victory in Europe.
Because of cutbacks in war pro-
duction, he continued, wage controls
should be relaxed to place a floor

NEWS V N

under workers' pay to Ieep it
wartime levels.

at

Reductions in working hours, in
many cases from 48 to 40 hours a
week, he claimed, have reduced the
workers' take-home pay to an aver-
age of "about $32 a week".
"Already fully 140,000 Ford Motor
Co. employes have been placed on a
40-hour week," Thomas declared.
"This means a reduction in take-
home pay of approximately $10 a
week for those who had been working
45 hours and a greater cut for those
hitherto employed more than 45
hours a week."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

.1

(Continued from Page 4) tecture Building, today at 3 p.m.
public is invited.

The

Parking regulations will be en-
forced by the Ann Arbor Police De-
partment.
The several concerts will take place
as follows:
Friday, May 3, 8:30 E.W.T. (7:30
C.W.T.) -- Oscar Levant, pianist;
Philadelphia Orchestra; Choral
Union; Eugene Ormandy and Hardin
Van Deursen, conductors.
Saturday, May 5, 2:30 E.W.T. (1:30
C.W.T.)-Zino Francescatti, violinist;
Festival Youth Chorus; Paul Leyssac;
narrator; Philadelphia Orchestra;
Saul Caston and Marguerite Hood,
conductors.
Saturday, May 5, 8:30 E.W.T. (7:30
C.W.T.-Bidu Sayao, soprano; Rosa-
lind Nadell, contralto; Women's
Chorus of the Choral Union; Saul
Caston and Hardin Van Deursen,
conductors.
Sunday, May 6, 2:30 E.W.T. (1:30
C.W.T.) - Rudolf Serkin, pianist;
Philadelphia Orchestra; Eugene Or-
mandy, conductor.
Sunday, May 6, 8:30 E.W.T. (7:30
C.W.T.) -Eleanor Steber, soprano;
Hertha Glaz, contralto; Frederick
Jagel, tenor; Nicola Moscona, bass;
University Choral Union; Philadel-
phia Orchestra; Eugene Ormandy
and Hardin Van Deursen, conductors,
Exhibitions
Sixteenth Annual Exhibition of
Sculpture of the Institute of Fine
arts: In the Concourse of the Michi-
an League Building. Display will be
)n view daily until Commcncement.
Events Today
The Geological Journal 'Club will
neet in Rm. 4056, Nat. Science Bldg.
it 11:15. All interested are cordially
Invited to attend.
The War Service Committee will
mneet at 2:30 p.m. at the Hillel Foun-
dation. All members are urged to
attend.
Sound Motion Picture, College of
Architecture and Design: Showing
the production of Stainless Steel
from the mine to the finished prod-
uct. Through the courtesy of Re-
Public Steel Corporation. 102 Archi-

Coffee Hour: There will be an
Association Coffee Hour at 3 p.m. this
afternoon at Lane Hall. Prof. Saul
Cohen will be the guest speaker. All
members of the Physics Department
will be particularly welcome.
Tea at the International Center,
every Thursday, 3-4:30 p.m. Faculty,
foreign students, and their American
friends are cordially invited.
$iological Chemistry Seminar will
meet today at 4:30 p.m., in Rm. 319
West Medical Building. "Precursors
of Milk Constituents" will be dis-
cussed. All interested are invited.
Lantern Night Song Leaders are
requested to attend a meeting at 4
o'clock today in Barbour Gymnasium
to draw for places and to receive
instructions. If the song leader her-
self cannot attend, please send a
substitute; each house must be reo-
resented at this meeting.
Unitarian Student Group: Special
supper meeting, Unitarian Church
today, 5 p.m. Rev. Stephen Fritch-
man, Editor of the "Christian Regis-
ter" and Director of the Unitarian
Youth Commission, will speak on:
"Unitarian War Service and Relief".
Program over in time for May Festi-
val.

EXPERIMENTAL T I R E - New experimental airplane
tire, 9 feet 2 inches in diameter and weighing 2,600 pounds com-
plete, is compared with auto tire in Akron, 0., Goodyear plant by
E. J. Thomas. company president.

F R A N C 0 0 N H O R S E B A C K-Generalissimo Francisco
Franco, reviewing a parade in Madrid, mounted a horse and rode
part way down the line of march and back to the stand.

a

Dance and Refreshments at
USO tonight at 7:30.

the

Coming Events
Luncheon Discussion: There will
be a Lane Hall luncheon-discussion
at 11:15 Saturday, May 5. Nancy
Richter will review a part of Myrdal's
"An American Dilemma"; group dis-
cussion will follow. Meeting will. be
over in time for aftez noon concert.
Make reservations for lunch at the
Lane Hall main desk. Everyone wel-
come.
Open house: The weekly Lane Hall
Open House will be held Saturday
night at 6:34 p.m. and all campus is)
cordially invited.
Dance and Refreshments at the
USO. Saturday evening, 7:30-11.

I

N E W B U R M A B R I D C E-Part of British 14th Army crosses I-rawaddy river near Mandalay
on a bridge replacing the one (background) knocked out during the 1942.retreat.

E D I T O R - John B. Powell,
American editor who lost his
feet in a Jap internment camp,
walks on his new artificial feet.
He was rep~atriated on the Grips-.
holmi in 1941.

IE EH * AR N
WITH WAR BODS-

JI

Ii ---- - ,- ..---______________________________ ___ '

:d

'P6'RSONA ,f

'VeCOMMeNDA TIONS

SYMPHONIC Music
MELODIOUS, IMMEDIATELY APPEALING,
YET TOO INFREQENTLY HEARD ON
THE CONCERT STAGE
BIZET: Symphony No. 1 in C Major
London Philharmonic under Goehr

DM 721

$4.72

DOH NA NYI: Variations on a' Nursery Tune

London Symphony with Dohnanyi
DM 162

. ..$3.67

KALINNIKOV: Symphony No. 1 in G Minor
Indianapolis Symphony under Se vitzky
DM 827................................$4.72

CH U N C K I NC DWELLINCS --Mouses like these in
Chungking, of matting and bamboo, are built up again continually
in China to replace those destroyed by enemy air attacks.

RACHMAN INOFF: Symphony No. 2 in E Minor
Minneapolis Symphony under Ormandy
D M 239 ........... ........... ......$6.82
SAINT SAENS: Symphony No. 3
(with Organ and Two Pianos)
Symphony Orchestra under Coppola
DM 100................ ........ $4.72
And don't forget the May Festival music. We have
recordings of practicallyall the major works
to be her formed.

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