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April 25, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-25

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IE MIC 14-GAN DIAILY

Senator'Happ Caneler

Named Baseball

Czar

j

Thinclads Gett
For Penn Rela
Wolverine Cinderme
Four-Mile, Two-Mile,
With the tentative personnel of
the Penn Relays squad named, a
select group of Michigan trackmen
will concentrate the rest of the week
on rounding into shape for what
could be the Wolverines' best Relays
performance in their ten-year parti-
cipation, according to Coach Ken
Doherty.
Michigan has never taken first
Pair of Homers
Puts Ott Nfear
Gehrig's Mark
NEW YORK, April 24--(:')-Melt
Ott found his home run eye for the
first time this season today and bat-
ted two into the right field stands,
each with a hired hand on base, to
give his New York Giants a 5-2i
margin over the Philadelphia Phil-
lies.
Ott's round trippers, the 490th and
491st of his 20-year career, boosted'
the Giant manager to within three
of Lou Gehrig's lifetime mark of
494.
The performance of Andy "Swede"
Hansen, a lean, loose-jointed young-
ster from Lake Wales, Fla., prob-
ably gave Ott more satisfaction than
his own slugging as the 20 year-old
rookie turned back Freddy Fitzsim-
mons' men with five hits.
'philaielphia .000, 100 010-2 5 2
New York. ..200 000 30x-5 7 1
Raffensberger and Peacock; Han-
sen and Lombardi..
MATajorA League
NATIONAL LEAGUE

ing into Shape
ys Competition
n Are Favored To Win
Distance Medley Relays
places in more than two events at
the Eastern carnival, but Doherty in-
dicated that his charges have a "good
chance" of copping three titles this
weekend at Philadelphia.
Doherty places his main hopes for
first places on the distance relays,
in which the Wolverines exhibited
their greatest strength during the in-
door season. Michigan will probably
rate the favorite role in the four-mile,
the two-mile, and the distance med-
ley relays, he said.
Conference Place-Winners
Running for the Wolverines in -the
four-mile event will be Bob Thoma-
son, Dick Barnard, and Ross and
Bob Hume. All four men grabbed
places in the Western Conference in-
door meet last month when Michigan
set a Big Ten record by slamming
the mile.
Archie Parsons, Barnard, and the
two Humes are Doherty's choices for
the two-mile relay, in which each
entrant will cover a half-mile. Bar-
nard finished second behind Illinois'
Bob Kelley in the Conference half-
mile run, while Parsons placed fifth.
The Humes were co-champions in
the half-mile last year, but did not
compete this spring.
37 of 55 1/10 Points
The distance medley will find either
Bob Mann or Bill McConnell lead-
ing off in the 440-yard dash, fol-
lowed by Thomason in the half-mile,
Parsons in the 660, and Bob Hume
anchoring in the mile. With the ex-
ception of the leadoff man, all placed
in the indoor meet.
Collectively, the runners mentioned
accounted for 37 of Michigan's 55 1/10
points at the indoor meet in the three
distance events, another Conference
record. If they can repeat their per-
formances at Philadelphia, Doherty
believes that three first places are
more than a possibility.
Meet To Run Two Days
The Wolverines will also be repre-
sented in the sprint medley, the mile
relay, and possibly the half-mile re-
lay, and one or two individual events,
providing additional opportunities
for places.!
The squad will leave for Philadel-
phia Thursday night. The distance
medley and the sprint medley will be
run Friday morning with the re-
mainder of the program scheduled for
Saturday.

DEPENDABLE DUO-Ross (left) and Bob lUunme, mainstays of the
Michigan track team for the past three years, will again find a heavy
burden on their able shoulders this weekend at the Penn Relays. Ross
has been entered in three events, and Bob in two.
Golfers Set for "g Ten, Opener;
N et Squad T Oleetn ere

Ohlo State Saturday
Chalking up a decisive win last
week over the University of Detroit.
15112-2%, the Michigan golf team
will be shooting for its second strai-
ght triumph when it tees off against
Ohio State in its initial Big Ten
encounter of the year Saturday at
Columbus.
Yesterday Coach Bill Barclay an-
nounced that six players will be
selected to make the trip and will
include the five golfers who partici-
pated in the Detroit match, Capt.
Paul O'Hara, John Tews, Phil Mar-
cellus, John Jenswold, and Bob
Ernst.
Barclay has not definitely decided
who the sixth player will be, but he
said that it is a choice between Ken
Morey, Bill Theunissen, Bob Hainil-
ton, and Hank Zimmerman. The
Wolverine golf mentor declared that
these four linksmen will play several
practice matches to decide who will
face the Buckeye team.
During the 1944 season, the Maize
and Blue golfers met Ohio State
twice, dropping the first tilt, 12-6,
and retaliating later with a 16-2
victory.
To date, the Ohioans have played
two contests, and have won both by
large margins.

Ter li

Kentuckia Gets Office Left Vacant
,For Five onths After Landis'Death

TeanSek

Second Win of Season
After an impressive 5-2 triumph
over Purdue in the first match of the
season, Michigan's net squad will
seek victory number two against
Wayne tomorrow in its final home
appearance until next month.
Roger Lewis, Michigan captain,
provided fans with the upset of the
afternoon in Saturday's match as he
soundly trounced Walter Lum, 6-3,
6-3. L, m was runner-up for Confer-
ence 1. ,nors last year and Lew-is' tri-
jimph established him as a leading
contender for championship laurels.
Other bright spots in the Wolver-
ine triumph were the performances
of Jack Hirsch and Gordon Nauggle,
two newcomers to the squad. Both
boys romped over their opponents
with comparative ease.
Jinx Johnson, now entering his
fifth year of varsity competition,
registered an jeasy victory in the
number two singles bracket.
Dave Post was the only Wolverine
1asualty in singles play as he drop-
ped a close thiree-set match. In the
doubles, Post and Roy Boucher lost
another three-setter after having
match point on several occasions.
Lewis and Hirsch racked up Mich-
igan's fifth score in the number one
doubles match.

Other Men Figure
i Loii~1isciSSiion
By ORLO ROBERTSON ,
Associated Press Correspondent, +
CLEVELAND, April 24.-Baseball's,
five-month quest for a commissioner
ended today with the selection of
Senator Albert B. (Happy) Chand-
ler of Kentucky to fill the position
vacated by the death of Kenesaw 1
Mountain Landis.
By a unanimous vote of the 16
major league club owners or repre-
sentatives, and on the first ballot,
the 46-year-old junior senator from
the blue grass state was named for
a seven-year term at an annual sal-
ary of $50,000.
'Immediately Available'
Leslie O'Connor, secretary to the
commissioner and a member of the
three-man body that has ruled the
sport since the death of Landis last
Nov. 25, said Chandler would take
office within a reasonable time. But
in Washington, Chandler said he
would be "immediately available".
The former governor of Kentucky
from Versailles was selected after a
four-hour discussion in which expec-
ted fireworks failed to materialize.
The group that favored the naming
of a commissioner at once, and was
ready to prolong the argument as
long as necessary, found enough sup-
port without extended debate after
the committee of four-Alva Bradley
of Cleveland, Don Barnes of the t.
Louis Browns, Sam Breadon of Afle
St. Louis Cardinals and Phil Wrigley
of the Chicago Cubs'-had made its
report.
Others Discussed
Other men were discussed but club
owners declined to say who they
* * *
New Czar Will
Assume Duties
'ImmediateI y'
WASHINGTON, April 24-(/')--
Senator Albert B. Chandler (D.-Ky.)
will be "immediately available" as
baseball's new high commissioner.
"Now that the war with Germany
is virtually over, I can conscientiously
leave my other duties," he said. "A
few months ago, I could not have
done so."j
The stocky, jovial Southerner who
has been known as "Happy" ever
since his college days, told a reporter
that "it's a big job and a tremen-
dous amount of good can be done."
Distribute Equipment
The first thing that baseball should
do after the war is "help to see that
all the surplus athletic equipment the
government has is distributed to
youngsters throughout the country."
A meeting of Sphix at 7:15 p.m.
tomorrow in the lounge of the West
Quad has been announced.

live
i n
the
sun
. if 0
your su
low in f
catch ev(
in rayo
mi artit
green.
Sics 10

were, pointing out that Chandler was
their man from the time they knew
that he was available. From another
source, however, it was learned that
the names of Gov. Frank J. Lausche
of Ohio; Bob Hannegan, chairman
of the Democratic National Commit-
tee; James A. Farley and President
Ford Frick of the National League
were mentioned prominently.
Selection of' Chandler for base-
ball's second commissioner since the
office was established in 1920 was in
line with the contention of many
baseball men that they should go
outside their ranks to fill so impor-
tant a position.
Lawyer Commissioner
Chandler, a graduate of the Uni-

versity of Kentucky and Harvard
law schools, also gives baseball its
second lawyer commissioner. Landis
was picked on the federal"bench to
take over the .iob following the Chi-
cago White Sox scandal of 1919.
A group of the club representatives
went into the meeting with the idea
of retaining the three-man commis-
sion composed of O'Connor, Frick
and President Will Harridge of the
American League for the selection of
a duration commissioner.
They found themselves outnum-
bered, however, as Larry MacPhail
of the New York Yankees and Hor-
ace Stoneham of the New York
Giants rallied a force that called for
immediate action.

nly to show off
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ront and back to / ..
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n High Tide in
'a gr a pe, and
to 18.
10.95 aSN '
Pi
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.. ..8.95
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:onlyCtsualoShop

MtAchir
and bra

W L
New York........6 2
Chicago......4 2
St: Louis .3 2
Cincinnati.. 3 3
Boston.........4 4
Brooklyn ..3 4
Philadelphia.....2 5
Pittsburgh. .. .2 5

Pet.
.750
.667
.600
.500
.500
.429
.286
.286

GB
1
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2
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31/2
3Y2

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 5, Philadelphia 2.
Boston 8; Brooklyn 6.
Chicago at Cincinnati, rain.
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Cincinnati.
Brooklyn at Boston.
Philadelphia at New York.
Only games scheduled.
AMERICAN LEAGUE

A E A T U

NEW SLANT PROPOSED:
'T 9raining BillI (Il

RE t J.I

CH A R M

STYLED BY
OF CALIFORNIA

W
Chicago ........5
New York ........5
Philadelphia .... 4
Detroit... ... ...4
Washington ,..... 3
Cleveland ........ 1
St. Louis . .........1
Boston...........0

L
0
1
2
2
3
4
5
6

Pet.
1.000
.833
.667
.667
.509
.200
.167
.000

GB
1/2
1 /
21/
4
4 /
51/

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit at Chicago, rain.
Boston at Washington, rain.
St. Louis at Cleveland, rain.
Only games scheduled.
TODAY'S GAMES
Detroit at Chicago.
St. Louis at Cleveland (2).
New York at Philadelphia.
Boston at Washington.
SECO

By BILL MULLENDJORE
"The bill proposing .national post-
war physical training, introduced in
Congress by Representative Weiss of
Pennsylvania, is entirely -iadequate
'if it hopes to reduce apps 'vably the
number of men who mi -it be ex-
empted by the Armed Forces from
military service," Track Coach Ken
Doherty said yesterday in an inter-
view.
Statistics released by Selective Ser-
vice show that approximately 50 per
cent of all potential inductees were
rejected because they were physic-
ally unfit, Doherty stated. To most
of us, he 'continued, these figures in-
dicate that 50 per cent of our young
men were so muscularly soft, short-
winded, or poorly-coordinated as to
be useless for military service.
"Actually, there is little or no rela-
tionship between the probability of
rejection and the condition of one's
muscles," Doherty said. "Soft mus-
cles might be a handicap during the
early weeks of military training, but
they are not causes for rejection."
Rejections by the Armed Forces
are based on a different phase of
total physical fitness, a phase which
might be called medical fitness,
Doherty pointed out, adding that
the causes for rejection, in their
approximate order of occurrence,
are: dental defects, defective eyes,
cardio-vascular diseases, musculo-
skeletal defects, venereal diseases,
nervous and mental ailments, her-
nia, ear defects, flat feet, and lung
diseases. "It is clear," he declared,
"that muscular condition bears lit-
tle relationship to these causes."

"The crux of the difficulty lies in
the vague use of the term 'physical
fitness'," Doherty pointed out. "Ac-
cording to my understanding, there
are three phases of total physical fit-
ness, which may be described as
medical fitness, motor fitness, and
motor skills fitness," he said, adding
that all three make up what should
be considered as total physical fit-
ness.
Medical fitness is present when the
organs and structures of the body are
sound and free from disease or de-
fect, Doherty said. Motor, or mus-
cular, fitness, he continued, is deter-
mined by the ability of the body to
continue strenuous activity despite
fatigue, while motor skills fitness in-
volves the performance of specific
muscular coordinations in certain
physical activities, such as war skills.
"Such a three-way definition of
- fitness helps to clarify several con-
troversies that have lately been in
the public mind," Doherty contin-
ued. "For example, many people
wonder why certain athletes are
able to continue competitive sports
despite rejection from the Armed
Forces as 'physically unfit'," he
said. "The answer is not 'wire-
pulling'," he pointed out, "but is
simply that a man who possesses
excellent muscular fitness may be
useless to the Army in terms of
medical fitness."
"The three-way definition also pro-
vides a basis for evaluating the pro-
gram of physical training suggested
by Rep. Weiss," Doherty said. "Any

national fitness program worthy of
its name must consider all three
phases of fitness. It must place pri-
mary emphasis on medical fitness by
suggesting a plan for prevention and
1emoval of the causes of rejection.
Second, it must insure the muscular
fitness of men subject to military
service. Third, it must teach the par-
(icular skills essential to modern war-
faie."
"It is obvious," Doherty concluded,
"that Rep. Weiss' program attempts
only the second of these aims, and,
further, it is equally obvious that
there are trained me in our educa-
tional system who already have the
knowledge and facilities for the pro-
gram he advocates without necessi-
tating military control."
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Three-Year Day Course
Four-Year Evening Course
CO-EDUCATIONAL
Mcimber Assn. of American Law Schools
U atder acelerated plan, Day Course may be
coupleted in two years: Evening Course
in two years and eight months.
DAY AND EVENING CLASSES
FIRST YEAR CLASSES BEGIN
On June 11th and September 24th, 1945,
and February 4th, 1946.
For further information address
Registror Fordham University
School of Low
.102 Broaidwa.,v. New York. 7. N.Y.

OUNRYCASUALS

jacoL/s, OW4-..

S

The "CROSS COUNTRY."

Th
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AT THE
RADIO & RECORD SHOP
715 N. UNIVERSITY

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RATION FREE! Piquant and carefree wedgies
of white caslin with "No Mark" plastic soles.

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