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April 21, 1945 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lt VOURt

THE j~M CfIGV4 IDAILY STU)Y PI 1

S-ATITIRIMV, ArrUl, 21,

Business Cour se
LABORATORY THEATER:
Student Written One-Act Plays
To Be Presented Next Monday
The performance of the four stu-
dent written one-act plays to be Laboratory Theatre in cooperation
given at 8 p.m. EWT (7 p.m. CWT) with the English Department.
Monday in the auditorium of Univer- Students See Own Work
sity High School will be open to the "The presentation gives the stu-
public, William Cooke, production dents an opportunity to see their
manager, announced yesterday. work in production and to see the
The four plays, written by students difficulties involved and the casting
in Prof. Kenneth T. Rowe's English system of allowing anyone who de-
85 class, will be presented by the sires to try out for a part gives many
students an opportunity for experi-
ence in dramatics," Cooke said.
T-S t o PurcellCooke, a special student in the Eng-
lish Department, was formerly Di-
rector for the Port Huron Little Thea-
Form ner Student, tre and recently appeared in "Uncle
Harry."
" The plays in production are Joan
K illedAction Lochner's "Pale Blond Boy" with
Carolyn West in the leading role of
T/Sgt. George A. Purcell, who was "Lucy" and "Voice of the Mountain,"
a senior in the School of Architecture a symbolistic play by Eleanor Good-
when he left for the service in 1943, rich which will feature a four minute
was killed in action March 15 in ballet in the prologue. The dances
Italy according to information re- were arranged by Betty Lesley.
ceived from the War Department. Considers Returning Veteran
Sgt. Purcell left for overseas duty "As You Were" by Mary Louf A he
last September and served as radio returning veteran. Arthur Shef, John
operator and gunner with the 15th Maring, Martin Litman and Henry
Air Force in Italy. He had completed Kaminski will play the leading roles.
25 missions. "Let the Great Gods - Command"
Son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. by Lois Barker is the story of an ht-
Purcell of 1816 Geddes Ave., Sgt. Pur- tempted mercy-killing. Barbara
cell was 23 years old. He graduated Weisberg who appeared in the first
in 1939 from Roosevelt High School, series of one-act plays, has the lead-
Ypsilanti and had studied for a year ing role.
at Michigan State Normal College be-
fore enrolling at the University where Tickets for Senior Night, to be
he became a member of Alpha Rho held at 7:30 p. m. EWT (6:30 p.m.
Chi. CWT) Thursday in the Lydia
Besides his parents, he is survived Mendelssohn Theatre, must be
by two brothers, First Lt. F. L. Pur- picked up by Monday at Miss
cell of the 307th General Hospital Ethel McCormick's office in the
unit, who left recently for overseas League, Jean Gilman, chairman,
duty, and Philip J. Purcell, a senioi announced yesterday.
at University High School.
r

o Be Offered Veterans

11 CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS

1, .. -._ ______. _ ___

THE ART CINEMA LEAGUE PRESE

NTS

Queries as to
Plan, First of
Kind, Sent In
Progranm To Train
Men For Careers
The intensive, short course in busi-
ness administration which will be of-
fered by the University of Michigan
to returning veterans is the first pro-
gram of its kind to be announced in
this country, Prof. C. L. Jamison, of
the School of Business Administra-
tion, said in an interview ,yesterday.
'The plan, which has been designed,
he said, especially for the veteran
who wishes to take advantage of the
educational and loan provisions of
the G. I. Bill of Rights in preparing
himself for ownership or employment
in a business concern, has aroused
immediate popular interest.
Inquiries Received
Inquiries are being received from
veterans in various parts of the
United States in response to radio
and newspaper announcements, said
Jamison, but to date it is impossible
to estimate how many registrants
will be expected. An estimate of the
number of veterans who are inter-
ested in the course, however, will soon
be available, he continued, for the
School of Business Administration
has supplied the Office of Veterans'
Administration in Lansing with a
condensed announcement of the
course.
5,000 Announcements
It is expected that 5,000 of these
'announcements will be sent to newly
discharged veterans by the Lansing
Office along with a circular letter in-
forming veterans of their rights under
the G. I. Bill. The preliminary an-
nouncement of the course, he ex-
plained, contains a form to be re-
turned requesting detailed informa -
tion, which will give the School of
Business Administration an idea of
the number of veterans who are in-
terested.
A bulletin describing the course is
now in the hands of the printers and
will be ready within the next ten days.
VETERANS:
Special Course
Interests .Ios
Letters from all our fighting fronts
and from all parts of the country
are pouring into the business ad-
ministration school in request for
information about the four month
intensive training course in business
administration to be offered in
November.
A letter from a serviceman in
France and one from a serviceman in
Germany, both of whom had seen
reports of the course in Stars and
Stripes, were received yesterday.
"This item (in Stars and Stripes,
Paris edition) is of particular inter-
est for us because of the close tie
in with the Army Education Pro-
gram," Lt. P. S. Hill, administrative
officer of the Post Vocational Train-
ing Center, U. S. Army Air Force
Station 379, wrote. "Here at Air
Force Headquarters the first Voca-
tional Center in this theatre has re;
cently opened. Our 'G. I. University'
serves as an operating model for all
Air Force units in ETO to adopt
and follow."
Another letter was received today
from a serviceman in Germany who
would like to go into business for
himself after the war and who be-
lieves he needs a course such as the

one being offered by the business ad-
ministration school because he has
been out of contact; with the business
world for more than three years.
BUY MORE ON

SOCIOLOG Y MEETING-
Professors from Michigan
Colleges To Address Group

The Michigan Sociological Society
will hold its spring meeting here next
Saturday, Dr. Robert C. Angell of
the Sociology Department announced
yesterday.
Speakers at the meeting will be
Norman Humphrey of Wayne Uni-
versity, Charles Hoffer of Michigan
State College, Robert C. Angell of
the University's Sociology Depart-
ment, Fritz Reidl, Wayne Univer-
sity, Rupert C. Koeninger, Central
Michigan College of Education, J. F.
Thaden, Michigan State College, and
James Stermer, Director of the Wil-
low Run Project.
Morning Session
Prof's Humphrey and Hoffer will
address the morning session of the
meeting at 10 a. m. EWT (9 a. m.
CWT) in the West Conference Room
of the Rackham Building. "Cultural
Tensions in Mexico" will be the sub-
ject of Prof. Humphrey's talk. Prof.
Hoffer will discuss "Social Planning
in War Time."
Dr. Angell will discuss some of his
experiences as a colonel in the Unit-
ed States aried forces for the past
two years at the luncheon meeting at
12:15 p.mi. EWT (11:15 CWT) in the
Union.
Afternoon Session
"Group Therapy with Delinquents"
will be the subject of Prof. Redl's talk
at the afternoon session at 2:15 p. m.
Jolston To Head
Schools CormmiSSion
Elected for a period of three years,
Prof. Edgar G. Johnston of the
University education school is now
a member of the administration com-
mittee of the Commission on Sec-
cndary Schools of the North Central
A,%sociation.
Prof. Johnston, assistant director
of the Bureau of Cooperation with
Educational Institutipns, is on a com-
mittee of seven, which with the three
cfficers, forms the Executive Board
of the Commission.

EWT (1:15 p. m. CWT) in the West
Conference Room of the Rackham
Building. Suljects of the other lec-
tures at the afternoon session will be
"Prisoners' Attitude Toward Teach-
ers," to be discussed by Prof. Koen-
inger, and "Social Aspects of School
District Reorganization" by Prof. J.
F. Thaden. Stermer will speak about
"Trends Toward Centralization in
Education and Government."
High School T
Give, Tinaf ore'
The vocal music department of
Ann Arbor High School will present
Gilbert and Sullivan's operetta
"H.M.S. Pinafore" at 8:15 p. m.
EWT (7:15 p. m. CWT) Friday and
Saturday in Pattengill Auditorium,
under the direction of Miss Rose
Marie Grentzer.
Ellen Gleason and Jim Bemis will1
play the leading roles of Josephine
and Ralph Rackstraw. The Orche-
stra will be under the direction of
Miss Elizabeth Green.

Hillel Workshop . ..
Prof. John Shepard of the 'psychol-
ogy department will discuss "The
Socio-Psychological and Economic
Aspects of Anti-Semitism" at the
third meeting of the "Workshop on
Anti-Semitism; Its Causes and Its
Cures" to be held at 7:30 p.m. EWT
(6:30 CWT) Monday in the lounge of
the Hillel Foundation.
In his talk Prof. Shepard will
emphasize the situation in Nazi Ger-
many and in pre-revolutionary Rus-
sia. Prof. Shepard was originally
scheduled to speak at the Foundation
April 2, but because of illness it was
necessary to postpone his lecture.
The meeting is open to everyone on
campus who is interested.
* * *
Organ R ecital *.. *
The "Sonata on the 94th Psalm"
by Julius Reubke will highlight the
organ recital by Frieda Vogan, di-
rector of music at the Presbyterian
Church and member of the School
of Music faculty, at 4:15 p. m.
EWT (3:15 p. m. CWT) tomorrow
in Hill Auditorium.
Her program will also include
Handel's "Concerto, in F major,
No. 5" and the B minor Bach "Pre-
lude and Fugue." Originally sched-
uled for last Sunday, Mrs. Vo-
gan's recital was postponed till to-
morrow because of the memorial
service for the late President
Roosevelt.

1

77

__ _ ._._ _ _ _ .. _. --- _._. _ _. _ ... --- _ __ __ _. v__® ._ 4
. _. __ _ .._._. r__ _ _ __.---
i

COME TO

CIIZN KA

Miller To Speak ...
"The Human Cervix in Health
and Disease" will be the topic of
an address by Dr. Norman F. Mill-
er, chairman of the department of
obstetrics and gynecology at the
University Hospital, to be delivered
at 4 p. m. EWT (3 p. m. CWT)
Thursday in the Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
Sponsored by the local Women's
Field Army of the American Can-
cer Society and the county medi-
cal advisory board, the lecture will
be open to the public.
* * *
Mason To Play...
Bernard Lee Mason, School of Mu-
sic, will present a violin recital, ac-
companied by Ealine Rathbun, at
8:30 p. m. EWT (7:30 p. m. CWT)
Tuesday in the Rackham assembly
hall.
The program will include Corelli's
"Sonata in D major," Chausson's
"Poems, Op. 25" and Brahms' "Con-
certo in D major, Op. 77."
BUY MORE BONDS
MOSELEY TYPEWRITER
AND SUPPLY CO.
114 SOUTH FOURTH AVE.
Complete Typewriter Service
Phone 5888

II

ORSON WELLES' PRIZE WINNING AMERICAN PRODUCTION
This Film is Proof that the Am;erican Screen can E-ul and
Surpass the Artistic Standards set by Foreign Productions
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
APRIL 19, 20, 21, 8:30 P.M. E.W.T.; 7:30 P.M. University Time
Admission 42c (tax incl.) ALL SEATS RESERVED

r rinq

[

A darling little calot . . . all shapcs . .
your favorite colors. A fetching flower-
zingo . . . the finishing touch for your
Spring outfit.

..,
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J,. . +
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4
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Charm the
Line
Charm the stag line with fra-
grance. . . Drop a dash of dry
perfume in the hem of your
prom dress. That's a quick flip
way to make your favorite per-
fume go farther. Select your
favorite scent from the six created
by- Roger & Gallet and fill the air
with fragrance as you dance. It's
captured stardust. . . it's Roger &
Gallet dry perfume.

TEH AT 3vBOXA
719 Noiti UNIVEIT itsiYAvLNUE

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Waslitenaw Ave.
William P. Lemon, D. D. James Van Pernis,
Ministers
Frieda Op't Holt Vogan, Organist and Di-
rector of Music.
E. Gertrude Campbell, Director of Religious
Education.
9:30 A. M.: Church School Intermediate, Sen-
ior and Adult Departments.
10:20 A. M.: Junior Department.
10:45 A. M.: Nursery, Beginner and Primary
Departments.
10:45 A. M.: Morning Worship. Mr. Roy S.
Lautenschlager will preach on "The Verities
in China."
5:00 P. M.: Westminster. Guild speaker will be
Frank Littell, whose topic will be "Growth
through Cooperation." Supper follows.
THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY_
IN ANN ARBOR
Series of Study Classes:
Every Thursday night, at 8:00 in the Michigan
League. Conducted by S. H. Wylie.
The public is cordially invited.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
-512 East Huron
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister and Student
Counselor
Miss Ruth McMaster, Associate Student
Counselor
Roger William's Guild House, 502 East Huron
- Saturday, April 21-
7:10 P.M.: Choir Rehearsal in the church.
8:30 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild Starlight
Hike. Meet at the Guild House.
Sunday, April 22-
10:00 A.M.: Study Class. "Christian Person-
ality."
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship. "The Church's
Opportunity Tomorrow," Rev. Marlin Farnum
5:00 P.M.: Roger Williams Guild. Mr. Far-
num will speak to the group on "Vocational
Satisfactions."
6:00 P.M.: Cost Supper.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State
Ministers: Dr. James Brett Kenna
Rev. Ralph Gordon Dunlop
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, Director
Mary McCall Stubbins, Organist
9:30.A. M.: Class for University Students. Wes-
ley Foundation Lounge. Dr. George E. Car-
rothers, leader.
10:40 A. M.: Church School for Nursery, Begin-
ners, and Primary Departments where young
children may be left during worship service.
10:40 A. M.: Worship Service. Dr. Kenna's sub-
ject is: "Religious Aspects of the San Fran-
cisco Conference."
5:00 P. M.: Wesleyan Guild Meeting for Uni-
versity Students. "Favorite Scriptures and
Hymns. Supper and Fellowship Hour.
6:00 P. M.: Young Married People's Discus-
sion Group meet in Green Room.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Mass: Daily 6:30, 7:00, 8:00.
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 10:00, 11:30.
Novena devotion Wednesday evening, 7:30.

I

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr. D.D.
Director of Student Work: Rev. H. L. Pickerill
Assistant Director: Miss Bobbie Simonton
Choir Director: Leonard V. Meretta
Organist: Howard R. Chase
9:30 A.M.: Church School, Junior and Inter-
mediate Departments.
10:30 A.M.: Primary and Intermediate Depart-
ments.
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Dr. Parr will
preach on the theme, "Tired of Doing Right?"
5:00 P.M.: Congregational-Disciples Student
Guild will meet in the Congregational assem-
bly room. Supper will be served. Dwight
Walsh will lead the worship service. The
Rev. Eugene Zendt will speak on "Marriage
and Homebuilding," the third talk in the
series on "Love and Marriage."
5:30 P.M.: Ariston League in Pilgrim Hall,
Dudley Klopfer, Counselor. Slides will be
shown of the summer conferences. Devotions
led by Beverly Teasdale.

III

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Division at Catherine
The Rev. Henry Lewis. D.D., Rector
The Rev. A. Shrady Hill, Curate.
8:00 A. M.: Holy Communion.
11:00 A. M.: Morning Prayer, Litany for a
Just and Durable Peace, and Sermon by
Dr. Lewis.
11:00 A. M.: Junior Church.
5:00 P. M.: Evening Prayer.
6:00 P. M.: H-Square Club, Page Hall.
6:00 P. M.: Canterbury Club Supper and
Meeting, Student Center, 408 Lawrence
Street. Speaker: Miss Mary Hayden, Red
Cross Recreational Worker, recently return-
ed from war experience in England, France,
Germany and Holland.
During the Week
10.A. M. Tuesday: Holy Communion, War
Shrine.
7:15 A. M. Wednesday: Holy Communion (fol-
lowed by breakfast at Student Center).
12:10 P. M. Wednesday: Intercessions for San
Francisco Peace Conference.
4:00 to 6:00 P. M. Friday: Open House, Stu-
dent Center.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and -uron Streets
Edward I. Redman, Minister
Miss Janet Wilson, Organist.
Mrs. Claude Winder, Church School Supt,
United Nations Sunday
9:00 A.M. CWT (10:00 EWT) Unitarian-
Friends' Church School.
9:00 A.M. CWT (10:00 EWT): Adult Study
Group. Clyde Vroman, speaker: "Music Ap-
preciation and Ability."
10:00 A.M. CWT (11:00 EWT): Service of
Worship, Rev. Edward H. Redman preach-
ing on: "Far Eastern Ally," a summary of
recent books on China by Harrison Forman,
Nym Wales, with a special order of service
for United Nations Sunday observance.
1:30 P.M. CWT (2:30 EWT): Unitarian AUY
Group meets at home of Dr. Ross Allen, 1403
Iroquois Drive.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
April 22: Doctrine of Atonement.
10:30 A.M.: Lesson sermon.
11:45 A.M.: Sunday School.
8:00e P.M. Wednesday evening testimonial
meeting.
This church maintains a free Reading Room
at 706 Wolverine Bldg., Washington at Fourth
which is open daily except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Here the Bible
and Christian Scienbe literature including all of
Mrs. Mary Baker Eddy's works may be read,
borrowed or purchased.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(Missouri Synod)
iFii 1 1I -f.-..-.- t Alln 1110i.-

ROGER

& GALLET

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FOR FOOD
T H AT'S BEST ! H

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
sponsored jointly by
Zion and Trinity Lutheran Churches
Zlin Lutheran Church-
East Washington at South Fifth Ave.
10:30 A. M.: Worship Service.
Sermon by Robert Eibling, Vicar.
Trinity Lutheran Church-
East William at South Fifth Ave.
10:30 A. M.: Worship Service.
Sermon by Rev. Henry O. Yoder,
Lutheran Student Association-
309 East Washington St.
5:00 P. M.: The Chinese Christian Group will
be guests of the Association and have ar-

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