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April 18, 1945 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1PHE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WPA G Still Yanks Reach
Unable To Oiutskits iof
Broadcast Luzon Capital

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WPAG, Ann Arbor's new radio sta-
tion, has been forced to postpone its
opening broadcast because of adverse
weather conditions which have pre-j
vented the completion of a 230-footI
transmission tower, Edward F. Bau-
ghn, general manager, said yester-
day, adding that it was probable that
WPAG woulb go on the air within a
week.
Devoted to Local Interest
The station, which will operate on
a frequency of 1050 kilocycles, will be
devoted to programs of local interest.
Mr. Baughn said that its purpose was
'to serve Washtenaw County.' In
addition to its local office the station
will have a studio in Ypsilanti, per-
mitting it to service an area of ap-
proximately 40 miles.
WPAG will join with the Michigan
radio network to present all Detroit
Tiger games with Harry Heilman
announcing. The station will fea-
ture world, national andnlocal news
on the hour and the "Community
Calendar" broadcast every morning
at 9:30 will list the day's events in
Ann Arbor. Other programs will be'
broadcast from the University studio
with students from radio classes, fac-
ulty and mtsical organizations tak-
ing part. A Community- Fund pro-
gram every Tuesday at 9:45 p.m. will
provide time for local civic groups.
With Radio Nine Years
Baughn has been connected with
radio for nine years most recently
with CKLW and formerly with
WCAR. Howard V. Walters, sales
manager, was formerly with KDON,
Monterey, Calif., Charles Wilton,
program director, had been connec-
ted with WWJ and George Stearns,
chief engineer, was a staff member
of WCAR.
Program Will
Honor Geologist.
The Departments of .Geology and
Mineralogy will sponsor a ceremony
commemorating the. hundredth an-
niversary of the death of Dr. Doug-
lass Houghton, pioneer Michigan ge-
ologist, at 4:15 p.m. EWT (3:15 p.m.
CWT) Thursday in the Rackham
Amphitheater.
Miss Helen M. Martin, research
geologist for the Geological Survey
Division of the Department of Con-
servation, will speak about Dr.
Houghton's life. Besides being the
state's first geologist, he was the first
professor of geology at this Univer-
sity.

Division Rescues
7,000 Civilians
By The Associated Press
United States 33rd Division infan-
trymen, beating down Japanese re-
sistance, have reached the outskirts
of Baguio, Philippine summer cap-
ital in mountainous northern Luzon,
and rescued 7,000 civilians who fled!
Nipponese internment.
In the fighting in the Ryukyus 325
miles south of Japan, Yanks of the
24th Army Corps control two-thirds
of le island on the west coast of!
Okinawa. The Japanese garrison of
1,000 is encircled on Mt. Iegusugu,
on the southeast corner of the 10
square mile island.
Japan itself felt the third Ameri-
can Superfortress task force raid in
four days, when B-29s hit six big
airfields on Kyushu yesterday. Amer-
ican eadquarters said a "large" num-
ber of the giant planes-possibly 150
--made the attack. Kyushu is the
southernmost of Nippon's home
islands and base for air assaults on
the Okinawa invasion forces.
Gen. Douglas MacArthur said the
33rd Division reached the limits of
Baguio Monday.
PATRIOTISM PLUS:
Annual Hillel S
Be Held Saturd

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ALUMNI ON WORLD BATTLE FRONTS:
Jiajor Haughey, f''Grad, Wins DSG;
Son of AWM1-Michigan Family Is Cited

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\. OKINAWA

"Pleasure and Patriotism" is the
motif 'of the annual campus-wide
spring dance of the Hillel Founda-
tion which will be held from 9 to 12
p.m. EWT (8 to 11 CWT) Saturday,
in the ballroom of the League, ac-
cording to Muriel Kleinwaks, social
committee chairman of Hillel.
The Foundation is sponsoring the
dance as the opening event of cam-
pus participation in the Seventh War
Loan Drive, and will cover all dance
expenses. The purchase of war
stamps at the door is the require-
ment for admission.
Bob Cooch and his orchestra, made
up mostly of University students, will
provide the music, featuring Helen
Bement as vocalist. The orchestra
has played at U.S.O. dances through-
out the state and at JAG school
dances.
War bonds will be sold during the
evening, and members of Avukah,
student Zionist organization, will sell
corsages for the benefit of the Jewish
National Fund.
Chaperoning the dance will be Dr.

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YANKS NEAR NORTHERN TIP OF OKINAWA-The Marine Third
Amphibious Corps pressed forward beyond Momobaru and Aha in the
northern sector of Okinawa, within 10 miles of the northern tip of the
island. Other units sought out isolated Japs on Motobu Peninsula. In
the south, the 24th Army Corps and the Japanese defenders of the
island are deadlocked north of Naha.,
/ eaehlugJob,
F- -
pEringDace O Ao
!ay inLea gue Shortages in Fields of
Education Made Public
id Mrs. Reuben Kahn and Mr. and
rs. Osias Zwerdling. The patrons Job opportunities for June gradu-
e to be Rabbi and Mrs. Jehudah ates equipped with teaching certifi-
. Cohen, Prof. and Mrs. Theodore cates are even better now than they
. Newcomb, Dr. and Mrs. Franklin were last year, Dr. T. Luther Pur-
ttell, Dr. and Mrs. Edward Blake- dom, director of the Bureau of Ap-
an and Miss Charlotte Kaufman. pointments and Occupational Infor-
A further list of patrons includes mation, has indicated.
r. and Mrs. Samuel Bothman, Mr. Because of the shortage of experi-
nd Mrs. Frank Fishow, Mr. and Mrs. enced teachers, Dr. Purdom has
arry Kaufman, Mr. and Mrs. Phil- shown that the demand for inexperi-
p Lansky and Mr. and Mrs. H. J. enced teachers is so great for the next
lass. school year that the average begin-
ning salary a teacher may expect
will be above $1,729, which was the
DAILY OFFICIAL average beginning salary for last
year.
BULLETIN A study of teacher supply, demand,
and placement has been carried out
among seventeen Michigan colleges.
(Continued from Page 2) Its results, Dr. Purdom said, reveal
that the Teacher Placement bureaus
could place some 4,800 beginning
aragueta, tonight at 7:30 p.m. I te~achers in Michigan. However, in
e Lydia Mendelssohn Theater. CalltchrstitoMthigD.PHowevesi
00 for reservations. La Sociedad contrast to this, Dr. Purdom believes
cture series tickets are good for 25 that there will be approximately only
tureseres tckes ae god fr 1 ,000 newly trained candidates avail-
nts toward purchasing a play tick- 100ew
by surrendering lecture ticket. able.
ydn tu k. An estimated 30 per cent decrease
in the supply of teaching candidates
Lecture in Sacred Music: The Stu- I now in training, as compared with
nt Religious Association and thenwinrangscmprd it
htRliiousAsoiawion andthe last year's supply, completes the sur-
chool of Music will present Dr. vey's general conclusions which point
elen A. Dickenson who will speak; out a critical shortage in the teach-
" The Place of Music in Protestantinprfsobth fexrecd
orship" this evening at 8 o'clock ing profession, both of experienced
the Kellogg Auditorium. and beginning teachers, Dr. Purdom
announced.
Coming Events Saturn, Moon To Be
Tea at the International Center, Observed Fridav
ery Thursday, 3-4:30 p.m. Faculty,
reign students, and their American The planet Saturn and the moon
iends are cordially nvited. may be viewed from 8:30 to 10:30
p.m. EWT (7:30 to 9:30 pjn. CWT)
Inter-Guild Inventory: Rev. H. 0.3 m W 73 o93 ~.CT
Friday from the telescopes at the
oder will discuss "Lutherans and Angell Hall Observatory, weather
otestant Action" at the Inter- permitting.
uild Inventory Thursday afternoon Through the telescopes may be
4 in Lane Hall. seen the engirdling rings of Saturn,
the sixth major planet from the sun.
Town Hall: Thursday evening at The observatory will be open to
30, the Student Town Hall will de- tie public. Children accompanied by
te the subject, "Resolved, That the their parents may come.
'aternity and Sorority System Is--
zsically Undemocratic". Students
terested in this discussion should INVEST IN VICTORY

By PAT CAMERON
The Haughey family, 100% Michi-
gan, made the news again when Wil-
frid Jr., a major in the Fifth Infan-
try Division of Patton's army was
recently awarded the Distinguished
Service- Cross, a letter to T. Hawley
Tapping, general secretary of Alum-
ni Association, has revealed.
Mother, father, two daughters,
six sons, and three of the in-laws
of this Battle Creek family attend-
ed the University between 1902 and
1943. Wilfrid Jr., '35, was a mem-
ber of Psi Upsilon, as were three of
his brothers, and a member of
Scabbard and Blade.
The citation accompanying the
Distinguished Service Cross said that
Major Haughey led assault elements
across the Moselle River near Arna-
ville, France, against strong enemy
,positions.
"Completely disregarding his own
safety, this intrepid =officer direc-
ted operations from front line po-
sitions, encouraging his men by his
bold, courageous example," the ci-
tation stated.
It continued, "After gaining the
Registration for
Nursing School
Ends April 23
April 23 is the last day for regis-
tration in the coming semester of
the nursing program being offered
by the University of Michigan School
of Nursing, and the next chance to
enter this program will not be until
registration in September, Rhoda F.
Reddig, Director of the School of
Nursing and of the Nursing Service,
announced.
Girls who enter this program are
eligible for entrance into the United
States Cadet Nurse Corps, in which
the government pays the nurse's ex-
penses in the professional part of her
program, Miss Reddig explained. The
degree program being offered leads
to a Bachelor of Science degree and
a diploma. in nursing. The program
consists of sixty hours of 'credit pre-
requisite to the professional course.
This college work may be taken in
any accredited college and offered in
transfer to the University of Michi-
gan.
Miss Reddig remarked that the
need for nurses is urgent, as is shown
by the government's request for 60,-
000 Cadet Nurses this year. Those
wishing to know more about the pro-
gram and the requirements for it
may see her in Rm. 2036 at the
University Hospital.

far shore, he directed the troops in
repulsing repeated fanatic enemy
counterattacks."
A letter from the father, Wilfrid
Haughey, '04, revealed that his son
had been in the first of Patton's
army to cross the Rhine and take
Frankfort.
The most recently graduated Hau-
ghey, Louis, '43, was a member of
Michigan's first graduating class in
the NROTC and now holds the rank
of lieutenant, junior grade, on the
destroyer "English" with Admiral
Halsey's task force. Lt. Haughey won
Floor Show Is
Planned for Ball
Pan-Amnerican Dance
To Be Held Friday
A Latin-American floor show will
be featured at the Pan-American
Ball, to be held from 9 to 12 p.m.
EWT (8 to 11 p.m. CWT) Friday in
the League Ballroom.
Gilbert Pesquera will be master of
ceremonies, and a Mexican quartet
will sing Jalisco. Rhumba specialties
will be provided by the Cuban quar-
tet, and the Harave Tapatillo- will be
featured as one of the dance num-
bers.
The program will open with a pre-
sentation of the flags of the twenty-
one nations in the Pan-American
Union. Russ Girt and his orchestra
will supply music for the semi-for-
mal dance.
Tickets may be purchased at the
League, the Union and the Inter-
national Centeir.
Kershner Will
Talk Thursda'y
Relief plans for children in Europe
will be discussed by Dr. Howard E.
Kershnen, vice-president of the Save
the Children Federation, at 4:15 p.m.
EWT (3:15 CWT) Thursday:in the
Hussy Room of the Women's League.
Speaking on "Saving the Future"
Dr. Kershner will disclose plans now
being formulated in France for the
rehabilitation.of Europe's education-
al system. The talk will be sponsored
by the Post-War Council and the
Ann Arbor branch of the Save the
Children Federation..
Dr. Kershner, who is chairman of
the overseas committee of the feder-
ation, plans to go to Europe next
month to carry on work in behalf of
child victims of war.

a letter in diving here anl was a
member of Psi Upsilon, Triangles,
Vulcans, and Inter-Fraternity Coun-
cil.
Charles S. Haughey also was
graduated in 1943, receiving his
B.S. in chemical engineering and
metallurgy. His sister Esther was
a student here in decorative design
for three years, finishing at Chi-
cago. Her husband is Ronald W.
Dolan, '37.
Louis and Wilfrid are not the only
sons in service. Capt. David 0. Hau-
ghey, recently returned from an as-
signment in France, was graduated
in 1940, and was affiliated with Psi
Upsilon. His wife is the former Rob-
reta Leete, '40, a member of Kappa
Alpha Theta, Mortar Board, and
Alpha Kappa Delta.
The Iaugheys were all very ac-
tive Michigan students, as demon-
strated by the campus career of
Phillip C. Haughey, now a Naval
Architect designing and building
amphibian tanks. Phillip was pres-
ident of Psi Upsilon, Tau Sigma
Delta, and of his Senior Class, be-
sides being a swimmer and a menh-
ber of Scabbard and Blade.
Also a Naval Architect, at Henry
Kaiser's Vancouver yard, Clifton, '37,
was a member of Delta Tau Delta,
Engineering Council, and Quarter-
deck. His wife, the former Margaret
Mustard, '35, was a member of Pi
Beta Phi, Woman's Manager of the
Gargoyle and vice-president of her
Senior Class.
The elder daughter entered the
University in 1927 and was a mem-
ber of Kappa Tau Alpha. She was
in newspaper work until her mar-
riage.
Wilfrid, Sr., was a member of Phi
Beta Pi medical fraternity and is
now a specialist in ear, nose, and
throat diseases. The mother, Edith
Cowle Haughey, taught school after
two years (1902-'04) here.
RECRS

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COTTON

CLASSMATES

C0-EDS cherish their
cool cottons for class-
room and campus events.
sDouble-duty favorites in-
cude one- or two-piece
fashioned from cham-
bray, spun rayon. ging-
ham, pique . . . Checks,
stripes, or solid patterns
Y_ in a variety of colors.
Junior and misses' sizes.
H8#95
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63
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AT THE
RADIO & RECORD SHOP

711.UIEST

§e et
arnd
JumperisI
in the
Casual

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4

be in Lane Hall at that time.
The Geological Journal Club will
meet in Rm. 4065, N.S. Bldg., at 12:15
p.m., on Friday, April 20. Program:
C. B. Slawson will report on "Indus-
trial diamonds in the war effort".
All interested are cordially invited to
attend.

Hungry-
CHATTERBOX
800 SOUTH STATE

THE MICHIGAN DAIIY
WISHES TO GIVE THE REST
POSSIBLE SERVICE TO ALL
OF ITS SUBSCRIBERS
N ORDER to accomplish this aim, we
are inaugurating a special courtesy service.
We request that you call 23-24-1 before

JV

New tricks
in* jumpers
for the long
sunny sea-
son!
Try a trim tailored
jumper with a variety
of blouses . . . try a
pastel with frilly ruf-
fles . . . try a white
with check trim .
all these and more
are yours so come in
with open arms and
an open mind and fill
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Shop

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Junior
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