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April 08, 1945 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAT, APRIL 9, 1"45

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SE1

Engineers To Give Ball Friday

Members of the School of Engi-
neering will present their annual
Slide .Rule Ball from 8:30 p.m. to
midnight Friday in the Rainbow
Room of the Union.
The formal dance is an all-campus
affair open. to members of any school.
Slide Rule Ball is the University
tradition highlighted by the efforts
of law students to obtain the famous
slide rule dear to the hearts of all
engineers. This year the slide rule
has been hidden in the West Engi-
neering vault and will be moved to
the Union the day before the Ball.
Louis Prima To Appear
Louis Prima, of nightclub, radioj
and motion picture fame will furnish
music fcr the dance. With him will
be his featured vocalist, Lilly Ann
Carol, and Charlie Kennedy and his
"sweet sax."
Prima has made many network
broadcasts and has appeared on such

popular shows as "Spotlight Bands"
and "Million Dollar Band." He is
known to movie audiences through
his performances in "You Can't Have
Everything," "Rose of Washington
Square," "Rhythm on the Range,"
"Start Cheering," and "Mantattan
Merry-Go-Round."
Commi-nttee Members
Committee members for the dance
include John Peterson as chairman
and Phillip Stemmer as vice-chair-
man, Coe Best, business manager,
Robert Royce and Robert Bald in
charge of tickets, James Wallis A/S
USNR, and Charles Helmick, pub-
licity managers, William McConnell
A/S USNR and Harold Fletcher, dec-
orations chairmen and Richard Seitz,
program chairman..
The committee is united in the
opinion that Friday the 13th will
bring no misfortune to any one
' connected with the dance.

I

Bright Days
Bring Forth
Qay Clothing E
By JOAN WILK
NOW that Easter has arrived, beenj
enjoyed, and departed, women on
campus are really convinced that
"spring is here" and with it comes
the thought of cotton dresses. play-
suits and pinafores.
FROM all indications, and espe-I
cially the calendar, it won't be too
long before warm weather finally de-
cides to stay, and with that thought
in mind, Michigan coeds are setting
out to buy clothing which will be in
accord with the rise in the mer-
cury.
LOCAL shops are featuring crisp
cottons in delectable shades rang-
ing from a rich coral to a faint blush
pink, as well as other delightful
shades of the spectrum. Materials
are available in ballon cloth, cham-
bray, gingham and piqu6. These may
be found in either plain or figured
stuff, and some few fortunate lassies
have even been able to find clothing
made from elegant eyelet piqu.

1Golf Meeting
Will Be Held
WAB Bowling Alleys Need
Coed Volunteers as Pinsetters
All coeds interested in playing golfi
are invited to the first meeting of
the WAA Pitch and Putt Club at
4:00 Wednesday at the WAB. !
The club discusses rules and tech-
niques, practices, and occasionallyI
has instruction. Members arrange
matches with each other by signing
up for afternoons on which they
intend to play.
Qualifying rounds for the Women's
team will be held later ,in the sea-
son. The four lowest scores will be
team members, and the next four
lowest will be alternates. At any!
time that a member of the club
turns in a score lower than one ofI
the qualifying scores she automat-
ically becomes a member of the team}
or an alternate.'
The Women's Team may always
play free on the University Golf
Course, and will play matches withI
the faculty and other players on
campus.

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Juniors' Play
To Be Financed
By Class Dues
All junior class dues must be col-
lected by 5:30 p.m. Tuesday. Mary
Bartley, secretary-treasurer of Jun-
ior Girls Play, announced yesterday.
Miss Bartley will be in the Under-
graduate Office in the League from
3 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday to accept
the dues.
Dies To Finance Play
The dues will be used to finance
JG play, "Take It from There,"
which is scheduled to be given at
7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 26, in
Lyqdia Mendelssohn Theatre in the
League. This performance will be,-
Senior Night, when the juniors hon- ;
or the graduating seniors.
Senior women will come robed in
their black caps and gowns and willI
present parts of their own JG play J
of last year to start the entertain-
ment. Last year's JG play was theV
first one given since the war began,
but the play has always been a tra-
dition.
The first chorus will meet at
5 p. m, tomorrow in the JGP office
in the League, and the second chorus
,:t 8 p.m. in the same office.
The makne-up committee will meet c
at 5 p.m. Wednesday in the JGP .
office in the League, according .to
'Cam Fisher and Joyce Siegan, co-
chairmen of the make-up committee.
All those who signed up to work on
the committee should attend. Others
who are interested are asked to callI
Cam Fisher, at 2-2591, before the
meeting.c
44
n A
inrann Arbor's

Jauori
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The newt

(OTTONS this year have been de- The WAB bowling alleys are in
signed with an eye' toward cor- desperate straits due to the un-
ort and this is exemlified n th reliability of their pinsetters, accord-
; tot ad tis s eempifid i ~h, iYs fit D rn~t Flin t garlirvsta

:,,

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YI

w~rap-clrozu dlorek.
Open heel
and' toe,

I

new cap-sleeve models that also fea-
ture low necklines, with simple skirts
and soft detailing through the bo-
dice.
A LSO new in exciusive women's
shops throughout the country are
the "Corselet Waist" dresses which
accentuate the doll waist. These arc'e
obtainable in s t frocks f
sophisticated black, or even polka
clots. Evening versions are fashioned
with shorter sleeves which ar espe-
cially attractive when w orn with
elbow-iength gloves.
pLAYSUITS are being shown with
"short" Ahorts this season and
ever-popular features of tiny pleats
and pockets. Matching or contrast-;
ng tops are worn with these and
many bare mid-riff models will be
seen at resorts during the warm
mnonths.

ing o joro y tnL ,i Itow ng man -
ager.
At the beginning of the semester a
large group of coeds v luniecred to
set up pins at the alleys,. whih, are
open from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. every
wc kday. Pinsetters receive free
bowling privileges, hut apparently
cutdocr sports have become more in-
teresting with the advent of warm
weather. For the last few afternoons
only a few coeds have appeared to
set pins.
Miss Flint has decided that hence-
forth if the alleys are to be kept
open, anyone wishing to bowl must
set up their own pins, or bring some-
one along to do it. This particularly
applies to those women participating
in the WAA bowling tournament. All
games in the third round of the
tournament must be played this
week.

STOR

GE

1 cdw ouor 1 ttffeet
F ~AM V IUSSET -
B-40[INNSmart Soei
108 East Washington Phone 2-2685
lI U ULLL1 LFULI~U~U1.VL YL-U-1..LJ-19

Petitioning Will Be Explained

Only

I i

Petitioning and interviewing for
ophomore and junior positions will
be explained in a meeting at 5 p.m.
Wednesday in the Grand Rapids
Room of the League.
Posts are open for Soph Project,
Sophomore Judiciary Aids, Junior
Project, and Junior positions on the
League Executive Council.
Junior openings include seven po-
sitions on the Social Committee, four!
on the Service Committee, four on
the Tutorial Merit Committee, and!
four en the Orientation Committee.

Additional posts available to juniors
are two assistants to the treasurer,
one assistant to the secretary, and
three offices for USO colonels.
There will be a second meeting of
all house directors and presidents at
7:30 p.m. Wednesday in the Grand
Rapids Room at the League.}
Problems and questions concern-
ing house rules will be answered and
discussed at that time. The meeting
will be under the joint sponsorship
of Women's Judiciary Council and
the Office of the Dean of Women.
.... :; ...: '.. .
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EDITIONt
ANN ARBOR, MICH APRIL ££, 1945

THE 1945 AMERICAN
RED CROSS War Fund
drive ended with every lo-
cal quota filled and city
and county reports still not
completed. The special
group composed of dona-
tions from University Hos-
pital, army and navy per-
sonnel on campus and civ-
ilian students went over
the top with $7,679.98
which exceeds the quota of
$7,400. Members of the
University faculty and
other personnel contrib-
uted a total of $5,834.25
also over their quota. Re-
ports from the Union drive
indicate that campus men
contributed over $700. Of
the fraternities, Sigma Chi
contributed $37 to top the
Alph Tau Omega house
with $33. According to re-
ports incomplete as yet,
Ann Arbor's total stands
at $92,409, which is 116.8
per cent of their quota.
Washtenaw county dona-
tions reached the total of
$168,350 or 125.3 per cent
of the county quota.

THE UNIVERSITY IS IN THE "VALLEY OF DE-
CISION" and must now decide either to retire from the
world into an ivory tower or strike out as a "real uni-
versity devoted to the increase and spread of knowledge,"
President Alexander G. Ruthven said before the Lansing
Alumni Club. He pointed out that the task of adjust-
ment will be more difficult than that of conversion to
war.
It will not mean reconversion to the old, but adjust-
ment to the new. Regarding the future he said, "We and
the returning servicemen know only in a general way
the kind of world they want, but these things are cer-
tain: for better or worse it will be their world; in shaping
it they will encounter new conditions which while less
of a shock to them than to us, will nevertheless require
study.
Listing a four-point program for the achievement of
this goal, Dr. Ruthven said:
1. We must strive for a community of ideas-a general
appreciation of values.
2. We must get at this business at once in the only
way possible-through education; and by education, he
said, I do not mean merely vocational training, the ac-
quiring of job knowledge, but a liberal education. train-
ing in the ability to think.
3. We cannot be satisfied merely with preparing
youngsters for citizenship, but must try to educate adults,
including veterans.
4. We should not confine education work to the school-
room.
Dr. Ruthven emphasized the need for keeping clear the

B.S. from the College of
Engineering here in 1912,
and was active in most en-
gineering college organiza-
tions on campus. Dr. Ken-
nedy, chief surgeon at
Grace Hospital in Detroit,
received his M.D. here in
1913 and took and com-
bined lit-med course.
A DEFICIT OF NEARLY
2,000 JOBS in Ann Arbor
after the war, was pre-
dicted in the "Survey of
Post-War Job Opportun-
ities in Ain Arbor" made
by the members of Prof. A.
H. .Hawley's class in Quan-
titative Sociology. Al-
though a surplus in Ann
Arbor's non-manufacturing
industries is anticipated, it
will not be sufficient to ab-
sorb workers released from
both manufacturing indus-
tries and the armed serv-
ices, the survey states. Tak-
ing a twenty-five per cent
sample of the five repre-
sentative types of industry
located in this area, the
survey shows that employ-

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