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April 08, 1945 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, APRIL 8, 1945

"THE MICHIGAND-AILY

Don

Lund Is

Schedule

to

Hat

Jack

Pot

By MARY LU HEATH
When Don Lund, captain and regular center fielder on this year's baseball team, is
awarded his third diamond letter by Coach Ray Fisher in June, he will be the eighth
nine-letter winner in the history of Michigan athletics and the first athlete in six
years to earn such an honor.
Lund's life has been curiously tied up with previous nine-letter winners. He was
preceeded at Southeastern High School in Detroit by Norm Daniels who, after'
playing on the baseball team which won the city and state championships, came to
Michigan and collected the maximum number of awards given in football, basketball,
and baseball from 1929 to 1932. Lund's basketball coach at the University, Bennie
Oosterbaan, was a nine-letter man also, winding up his career in Wolverine sports in
1925.
Although Lund was drafted by the Chicago Bears pro football team for tle
coming season, he prefers baseball to the gridiron sport, and would like to make a
career of the game. Coach Ray Fisher, who is starting his 25th year of Michigan

baseball, believes that the possibility of Lund's making the grade in the majors is a
very real one.
Lund has been approached by both the Washington Senators and the Detroit
Tigers, on the subject of a professional career, but has remained in the University,
where he will graduate in physical education this June.
If he were to go into baseball seriously, he would probably teach during the
off-seasons. Although he would want to coach in a high school or college, Lund is
also equipped to teach history, in which he is minoring.
Since he entered the University in 1941, Lund has played under three football
captains. George Ceithaml, Paul White, and last season's captain, Bob Wiese, were
chosen to lead teams on which Lund has played, and last season, with Wiese's mid-
season departure, he himself served as co-captain with quarterback Joe Ponsetto.
Although his tenure on the team has been lengthy. he has never played at any other
position than fullback.
Lund enjoys thi distinction of having played on the- last "all-Michigan" team
before the war brought athletes from other schools to the University with its Navy

V-12 program. This was during his sophomore year, when he was a teammate of
boys like Tom Kuzma and Julie Franks. N.
During the 1942 basketball season, Lund got one of his biggest thrills in sports
when he played against Illinois' famous Whiz Kids. He considers the Illini team of
that year one of the greatest sports combinations he has ever seen.
In baseball, he enjoyed most working with Elroy Hirsch, who was one of the
ace hurlers on last spring's squad. "If anyone ever commanded my respect, Elroy
did," Lund says, "mostly, I think, because he had so much competitive spirit that
yclu always did your very best in backing him up." And Lund certainly backed
!Hirsch up, for it was his bare handed circus catch in the last Conference game
which helped give Hirsch a victory over Purdue and was called the best fielding
play of the season.
Of the three years in which Lund has participated in Michigan athletics, none
has ever netted him injuries amounting to more than a sprained ankle. For this luck,
the husky athlete is grateful, because you don't play marbles when yeu are up against
the big boys.

Tiger iound Staff Adds
Trio of Von trot Artists'
By The Associated Press three possess the coveted knack of
TERRE HAUTE, Ind., April 7- putting any given pitch precisely
Control, the pitching asset that where they want it.
wasn't there in Detroit's 1944 Ameri- "We've got much more control, and
can League flag fight that fell one much more stuff than last season,"
game short, isn't one of manager O'Neill declares. "Curves of all our
Steve O'Neill's worries this season. pitchers are breaking sharper, thanks
The Tigers of last season, after to excellent conditioning weather."
steady Hal Newhouser and Paul (Diz- O'Neill's chief case in point is
zy) Trout, didn't possess a finger righthander Zeb Eato-a, one of De-
that could find the plate consistently. troit's "chain gang" relief pitchers
Relief pitching, to Detroit, meant a of 1944.
steady stream of firemen from the "Eaton's curve never broke better
bull pen, none of whom could put than this spring," the Tiger boss re-
out a candle. marked. "And his control is 100 per
Three added starters on the Tiger cent improved.''
mound corps this spring-big Al Ben- "Last year Zeb threw most of his
ton, Army dischargee, Les Mueller and pitches from different angles. Now
recruit Walter Wilson-loom as the he's learned how to throw everything
top "control" artists of the staff. Ben- from the same position. In other
ton figures to be used asa starter; words his delivery has become better
Mueller and Wilson in relief. All 'grooved'."

Iaking the IGun44
By HANK MANTHO
Daily Sports Editor

i ITST

AS

W"EBSTER S
CO LLEGIATE DICT ARY

N RECENT ISSUES of various newspapers in the country that carried
remarks made by Gil Dodds of Boston in a radio. interview which per-
tained to the incident of the removal of his world indoor track record for
the mile run, the Amateur Athletic Union was again subjected to bitter
criticism for its actions.
Dodds, who is better known as the "Flying Parson," retired from
track to become a traveling minister this year, and when he was notified
that his record had been ruled out, he made this statement to, news-
papermen: "The A.A.U. likes to count the greenbacks that slip across
the ticket window." Inasmuch as this statement was misinterpreted
by many people, Dodds tried to clarify it by stating that "I meant that
they want the money to advance amateur athletics."
The world indoor-mile record of 4:06.4 which Dodds esablished was
stricken from the records when officials suddenly became aware of the
fact that the mark was set on a track which had no inside curbing.
However, these same officials made no attempt whatsoever to rule
out all other track records that were set under the same conditions and
on the same track, and this faulty line of reasoning, which is pretty hard
to comprehend, is the main line of contention that has arisen.
N RETROSPECT, it seems that a similar border-line case was brought
to our attention not so long ago, and this hit home, for the athlete
concerned was a former Wolverine track star, Bob Ufer. Ufer, who was
arduously training to return, to competition in the hopes of retiring the
Cardinal Hayes Memorial Trophy for the 600-yard dash in New York's
Madison Square Garden was declared a professional by the A.A.U. on
the premise that he was combining his athletic abilities with coaching, a
money profession,.
However, Glenn Cunningham, Les Eisenhart and many other track
greats, combined amateur running with teaching and nothing was done
to deprive them of their amateur standing. The ironic: part of this
edict was that Ufer held the same position while competing the year
before and nothing was said.
The charge was brought up that this could have been the A.A.U.'s
method of taking a crack at the Western Conference for prohibiting Big
Ten track men from competing in Eastern circles. This intimation against
the A.A.U. was almost entirely disregarded, but this case of Ufer's has been
bolstered by the new one of Dodd's, who claims that his record has been
ruled out because A.A.U. officials did not like him to retire when he was
a good drawing card.
Dodd's statement is substantiated by the fact that his record was
net obliterated from the books until his retirement, and it seems incon-
ceivable that this is coincidence, especially since we allowed for coin-
cidence in the case of U1fer.
This column finally boils down to the question of what we intend to
do about such matters. Is the A.A.U. an association that is interested in
the betterment of amateur athletics, or has it suddenly lowered its standards
to the point where prejudices and personal animosity will take precedence
in their judgments?
THE GOOD OLD DAYS

Wings To Play
Second Game
In Cw- Finals
Detroit Seeks Fourth
Title in Leafs Playoff
By The Associated Press
DETROIT, April 7-Still hopeful
of winning hockey's most prized tro-
phy for the fourth time, the Detroit
Red Wings planned to produce a
strong attack on the Toronto goal
from the outset in Sunday night's
second game of the Stanley Cup fin-
als here.
To even the series at one gameI
each before the teams shift the scene
to Toronto, the Wings must find
some way of cracking an alert Maple
Leaf defense that blocked them off
from the danger zone in Friday
night's opener.
In ten games of the regular season
Detroit players drove 44 goals into
the MapleLeaf nets,dbut they drew
a complete blank Friday as the Tor-
onto defenders gave goalie Frank
MeCool almost perfect protection,.
Dave Schriner's ten-foot shot in the
first period was the only score of the
game.
There'll be no waiting, or "feeling
out" in Sunday's game, Earl Seibert
of the Wings promised today. "We'll
attack," he said. "We'll pen them in
their end and keep them there all
evening."
Bob Chappuis, Former
grid Star, Is Prisonter
Lt. Robert Chappuis, former Mich-
igan football star, is a prisoner of
war somewhere in Germany, his par-
ents have revealed.
Chappuis, who played left halfback
in 1941 and '42 for the Wolverines,
had been listed as "missing in ac-
tion" prior to the announcement of
his safety.
VICTORY HAIR-CUTS!!
One blended- shaded- cut to
conform to your specifications!
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State & Mich. Theatres

z

F LL~F 1

EACH EX PENDITURE COUNTS

I

I

'Fans efined'

Ump

SPEND WISELY-Careless spending promotes infla-
tion. A budget guides- spending and sets aside money
for necessary expenditures.
BANK BY MAIL if you haven't the-time or the gas to
to come into town. We'll be glad to mail you a budget
book, too, free upon request!
101 SouTH MAIN 330 SOUTH STATE
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

MEMPHIS, April 7--(/P)-Harry
(Steamboat) Johnson looked back
over 34 years of umpiring today and
concluded: the baseball fan's aim and
language "ain't what they used to
be."
It's been a long time since a beer
jug was banked off my head," the 1
graying, 57-year-old Southern League 1
arbiter said with a note of nostalgia,
and since I've heard an epithet that
really made my ears burn.
The baseball fan, like the player.
is getting more refined.
The steamer, believed the oldest
umpire in point of service in profes-

sional basball, declared with ill-con-
cealed pride that he had been "pop-
bottled twice in every park in the
league."
"I've had some seven thousand pop
bottles flung at me," he added, "not
to mention beer jugs, brick bats and
other handy items.
But, ycu know, I've only been hit
20 times. I've kept count. It's been
two years since a bottle was thrown
at me and I haven't been hit since
1939.
The colorful little ball-boomer with
the fog horn larynx said this was in-
deed a far cry from the old days.

HAPPY LISTENING HOURS ORI YOU

U
t)U
UINI 1'i

C"LEVELAND MASTER
"T IIE MODEWLS T HE MEN IN TiHE
MAKE your own model of planes constantly seen
on front pages of newspapers everywhere - from
the world's finest line of authentic 4" built-up
f!yinig scale inodels.

SYMPHONY NO. 88 in D MINOR
Haydn . . . Toscanini
SYMPHONY NO. 1 in C MAJOR,
Op. 21 . . . Beethoven. Rodzinski
and the Cleveland Orchestra
SYMPHONY NO. 2 in D MAJOR
Brahms . . . Or nandy and the Phila-
delphia Orchestra and Weingartner
and the London Orchestra.
SYMPHONY NO. 9 . . . Beethoven.
W/eingartner and the Vienna Or-
chestra and Stok.owski and the Phil-
adelphia Orchestra.

I

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These superb orchestrations and other
-iavokite selections on the May Festival

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All

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