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March 25, 1945 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

MIGHT SAY ANYTHING:
"Little Flower" Will Address New Yorkers

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK, March 24-Promptly
at 1 p.m. tomorrow, a squatty man
with a mop of unruly black hair will
unbutton his vest with a single mo-
tion born of long practice, yank his
dark-rimmed spectacles off his fore-
head and strain forward over his
desk like a racehorse at the barrier.
He will drum on his desk in city hall
with his fingers and gesture to the

director of the city's radio station
to stop playing the Marine hymn,
nod to the announcer to introduce
him, and then say, "patience and
fortitude."
That will be Mayor Fiorello H. La-
Guardia, sometimes known as The
Little Flower," "The Hat," or
"Butch," in his "weekly talk to thej
people." When La Guardia gets at a

microphone, anything can happen.
But it happens through design and
not be accident.
Last Suniday, he used his broadcast
to announce that New York City
would not continue to observe the
midnight curfew.
Tomorrow he may have another
sizzler that will evoke national and
municipal reaction.

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Fast Production
Must Continue
After Nazis Fall
J. A. Krug Says Supply
Shift 'Not Practicable'
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, March 24-Filling
up the supply pipeline to the Paci-
fic theater will demand continued
high war production well into the
period following German collapse,
J. A. Krug said today.
The WPB chairman in an interview
helped to clarify the running con-
troversy whether the troops shifted
from Europe to the Orient would
leave most of their equipment behind
and be rearmed for the war against
Japan.
Krug Agrees With Batt
Krug agreed with his vice chair-
man, William L. Matt, who said the
army and air forces would have to
be "pretty completely re-equipped,"
since it would be "simply not prac-
ticable" to re-assemble, repair and
transport materiel from Europe along
with the troops-the men will be
moved too fast.
This does not contradict the army's
repeated claim that it will salvage "as
much equipment as possible" for use
against the Japanese, Krug stated.
Engel Demands Explanation
The prospect of paying for new
arms for the Pacific has alarmed
some Congressmen. Rep. Engel (R.-
Mich.) demanded an explanation
from Secretary of War Stimson, serv-
ing notice that he would seek to
cut the army's next appropriation to
the extent of any duplicated produc-
tion.
Stimson replied by letter that the
War Department's policy was to make
"maximum transfer" of all equip-
ment which could be "effectively
used" against the Japanese foe.
Undersecretary of War Robert P.
Patterson took up the issue this week,
telling reporters that the army al-
ready has made estimates of the
amounts expected to be salvaged, and
that the percentage would run high
on artillery and other durable items.
No War Department Denial
There was no War Department de-
nial, however, that the transferred
men would have to be substantially
re-equipped.
On the contrary, the army feels
growing concern over the amount of
shipping needed to bring large forces
to bear against the Japanese in the
months following the Nazi collapse.
Phillipine Club
Progra To Be
Given April 4
A program commemorating the re-
turn of American and Filipino forces
to the Philippines, organized by the
Philippine-Michigan Club, will be
presented at 8 p.m. April 4 in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
A lecture by Mrs. Pilar Hidalgo
Lim, appointee of President Osmena
of the Philippines to the Philippine
Rehabilitation Commission, will be
featured on the program. A leader
in social and political activities in
her own country, Mrs. Lim's topic
will be "The Orient Sees America's
Vision."
Following the address, the Fil-
pino students will present native folk
dances and songs, illustrating the
culture and music of the country. A
string quartet will provide Malayan
music.
"Filipino students attending the

University have designed this pro-
gram as their contribution in assist-
ing their fellow nationals now facing
hardships in their own land," George
Hall, assistant director of the Inter-
national Center, announced. Tickets
may be obtained from any of the Fili-
pino students, or from the Interna-
tional Center.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON, March 24 - The
American Legion made public today
what it called "a simple, clear-cut
program" for the employment of re-
turning war veterans.
Its four-point proposal was built
around these basic elements:
1. "Welcome them back as men
with a sincere greeting, an honest
assurance that a job is awaiting
them, fitted to their abilities.
2. "Make a realistic analysis of
the jobs available, and of the vet-
eran's aptitude, interests, ambi-
tions, tastes and training.
3. "Fit jobs and veterans together
as the result of such realistic ap-
praisal.
4. "Cooperate intelligently with the
veteran after he is placed in A job;
with ready willingness to make ad-
justments as actual experience on the
job makes those adjustments advis-
able."
The program was prepared by the
Legion's national employmentcom-
mittee. The job of carrying it out
was assigned to Ralph H. Lavers, the
organization's national employment
director. It was made public by Ed-
ward N. Scheiberling, national com-
mander, who declared it was based
on "sound business efficiency and
necessity" and not on "sentiment."
"These are the veterans, the
cream of Americals human re-
sources," a foreword read. "They
are the men we must employ first,
not because of duty, not out of
sentiment, but because we cannot
do without their courage, skill and
initiative. We cannot let their fresh
Paralysis Pack
Machie Built
Toledo UAW Workers
Credited with Invention

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Legion Proposes Four-Point
Vet Employment Program

leadership become embittered and
disillusioned."
Scheiberling said the Legion pre-
pared the program after consulta-
tion with American business.
"By every rule of ability, of eco-
nomic necessity, by law and senti-
ment," the Legion said, "the veteran
has first call upon American business
and industry."
"But we should do the veteran an
ill favor if we employed him and left
other millions of workers out of jobs.
That way lies economic collapse, state
socialism or state capitalism."
The problem it said, is one of
the fullest possible employment-.
a job for every man and woman
seeking one."
The Legion estimated that 55,000,-
000 postwar jobs must be found "if
we are to preserve our free America."

I&&&

Co-op Council
Maps Post-War
. .
Extension Plans
"Although four houses have been
closed sincei1941, the Inter-Coopera-
oeative Council expects intensive cam-
pus co-op expansion after the war,"
Frank Nakamura recently re-elected
ICC president said yesterday.
Nakamure stated that the local
co-op is purchasing two houses, at
816 Forest and 1017 Oakland while
improving houses already in use.
"At present five houses, of which
three are women's residences, are
open," he said, "but after the war,
local co-op membership will be raised
by veterans who belonged to the
group before going into service."

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Give To The
Red Cross

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Double life for a suit-morning and afternoon acces-
sories that change the face of your suit with chameleon
quickness, make it appropriate for an a.m. or p.m. occasion.
As Vogue tersely puts it-"Accessories are the etiquette

of fashion" and "It's how you wear accessories, this spring,
that makes all the difference."
A-Handbags B-Eisenberg C-Handkerchiefs
* Genuine Alligator * White Hand
* Morocco * Clips Embroidered

" Alligator Grain
* Lizzard Grain
" Corde
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D-Gloves
* Pigskin
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" Rayon
Jerseys

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* Earrings
* Bracelets
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* Prints

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Crepe
Chiffon
Sheer Wool
Taffeta

STORE HOURS:
9:30-5:30 Daily

DETROIT, March 24-(AP)-A ma-
chine for preparing polio packs used
in treatment of infantile paralysis
patients has been designed, perfected
and constructed by United Auto-
mobile Workers (CIO) members at
the Spicer Manufacturing Co., To-
ledo, vice president Walter P. Reuth-
er o fthe international union said to-
day.
Efficiency of the machine has been
estimated by the Toledo Society for
Crippled Children at approximately
six times that of the old method of
preparing the packs by using a wash-
tub and wringer.
Spicer workers collected $15,000 to
build the machine, Reuther said, and
have turned over all patent and roy-
alty rights to the society for crippled
children.
The packs, for use in accordance
with the Sister Kenny technique,
must be of a precise, specified tem-
perature and their moisture evenly
distributed.
Teen. gers To Go
On Station WKAR
The qualities of a good mother as
seen by teen-age youngsters will be
discussed at 2:30 p.m. tomorrow in
one of a series of programs on fam-
ily life to be presented by the Uni-
versity overstation WKAR.
The six Ann Arbor high school
students to take part in the program
believe that some of the desirable
qualities of a mother are: making the
young folks feel they are welcome in
the home, allowing them to mess
around in the kitchen, giving them a
chance to learn by doing things and
enjoying sports events along with the
young folks.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION

*

Wui ~ct w"ith ixi gat ricl.zvcick trim?

MARCH 25, 1945

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

most students who are as-
signed in the V-12 pro-
gram to a specialized cur-
riculum and who will have
completed four terms by
July 1, will not be transfer-
red to the NROTC but will
be allowed to continue as
members of V-12. Prof.
Clarence F;. Kessler said
that under the new pro-
gram men will have a wid-
er choice of electives than
they had under the V-12
program, in which all cour-
ses were prescribed. The
students who will have
completed four semesters
in the V-12 by July 1, will
continue to take a vary-
ing number of terms up to a
total of eight, and willj be
transferred to Naval Re-
serve Midshipman School
for an additional term of
intensive training prior to
being commissioned.
SGT. IRVIN "PETE"
Lisagor, '39, an ex-editor
of The Daily and varsity
baseball player, revealed
the "inside dope" on the
London Stars and Stripes,
of which he is managing
editor, in a recent letter to
T. H. Tapping, editor of the
Michigan Alumnus. "Pete"

six days a week by the Lon-
don Times, and many of
our most amusing experi-
ences come from trying to
acquaint the printers and
compositors with GI lingo.
*: *:k
PROSPECTS are that
the Michigan baseball team
which runs out on the field
for the opening game this
season will be the most
seasoned in Wolverine
diamond history. Normal-
MICHIGAN'S track squad
topped off its indoor season
at Lafayette;,f Id. last
night by winning first
place in the University di-
vision of the Purdue Re-
lays, beating second place
Illinois, 361/2 to 20. Scor-
ing heavily in the long dis-
tance relay events and us-
ing its traditional team bal-
ance to good advantage,
the Wolverines had little
difficulty in annexing the
title for the second year in
a row. Coach Doherty's
men raced to victory in the
two-mile relay and dis-
tance niedley relay, finish-
ed second in, both the mile
relay and sprint medley,
and picked up two thirds
anid a fourth in individual
events to roll up their win-
ning margin. Miami'Uni-

ANN ARBOR

, 1

0

Gve

BOOKS /.
- Ludwig Bemelmans ..

THE BLUE DANUBE

AMONG the thousands of "Job Ob-
jectives" listed in the "Dictionary of
Occupational Titles," published by
the Federal government, there are
several hundred to which our cours-
es lead. Among them are these:
Accountant Secretary

CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE - Samuel Shellabarger
APARTMENT IN ATHENS - Glenway Westcott
THE TROUBLED MIDNIGHT - John Gunther
SOLUTION IN ASIA - Owne Lattimore .
BATTLE REPORT - Comdr. Jarig & Lt. Kelly
TEACHER IN AMERICA - Jacque Barzum . . .
MASQUE OF REASON - Robert Frost .
BLACK BOY - Richard Wright . .

Ca i/er
3.00
3.00
2.50
2.50
2.00
3.50
3.00
2.00
2.50

Auditor

Stenographer

TALKING IT OVER-Golfers Ben Hogan (left)
and Ed Dudley, chat as they await the starter's
call during the four-ball golf tournament at

Miami, Fla.
president ofI

Hogan is in
the PGA.

the Army, and Dudley is
English hospital. The two
were close friends and
great soldiers, the investi-

Bookkeeper Typist
Office Clerk Stenotypist
Office Machine Operator
Such positions require technical
business training. For those who
have ability and ambition, they lead
to executive positions in business.
We'll be glad to help you choose
your post-war goal, and to suggest
the course which will prepare you
for it most effectively, in minimum

. JUVENILES ..

WHITE RABBIT WITH MAGIC NOSE - illustrated by Masha
CHILD'S BOOK OF BIBLE STORIES - illustrated by Masha .
COUNTRY BUNNY AND THE LITTLE GOLD SHOES .

. . 1.00
. . 1.50
. . 2.00

anonymous soldier as its
man of the year. The last
project turned out to be

III

PETER RABBIT - Animated . . .

1.00 1|

M

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