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March 22, 1945 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1945-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY T

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was appointed to serve as psychia-
tric consultant to Gen. Lewis B. Her-
shey, chief of selectivetservice, and
he immediately began to devise the
method.
The survey consists of a series of
forms, Dr. Waggoner explained, the
first of which is filled out by the reg-
istrant himself, and its purpose is to
establish identification.
The selectee also supplies educa-
tional data, verifying years of study,
courses completed, and the ability to
read and write the English language.
Describes Routine
Dr. Waggoner told how the identi-
fication form is transmitted to the
State Director of-" Selective Service,
who checks with the State central
file for mental diseases, or with such
other agencies in the State which
would have a record of any treatment
or commitment of mental cases. If
there is nothing on file for the reg-
istrant, the form is returned to the
local board marked "Not Identified."
The Selective Service doctors re-
cord the medical data, which is then
forwarded to the Medical Field
Agent who investigates the social
history of the registrant. This sur-
vey involves factors concerning per-
sonality and adjustment, and the
information is supplied by former
teachers or employers, Dr. Waggoner
stated.
Schools Supply Histories
Educational histories are supplied
by secondary schools and other insti-
tutes attended through a Cooperative
School Program.
Thus, the personal history of each
selectee is made available to the
psychiatrist at the induction station,
concluded Dr. Waggoner.

Highli ghis
OnCampus...
Jobin To Tell War Tales
Relating some of his experiences
and impressions of the French dur-
ing World War I, Antoine J. Jobin,
assistant professor of French, will
deliver the sixth and final lecture of
the Cercle Francais at 4:10 p.m.
Tuesday, Rm. D Alumni Memorial
Hall.
An interpreter during the first
World War, Prof. Jobin will give his
impression of France at war and will
describe the life of French students
at the University of Dijon, where
he spent four months. In his lecture,
he will give an account of France
at the time of the Munich Pact prior
to the outbreak of World War IL.
Election of Officers .. .
Officers will be elected at a
meeting of the Post-War Council
at 4:30 p.m. today, Rm. 302, Michi-
gan Union.. Students who are in-
terested in joining the council are
urged to attend.
Lane Hall Coffee Hour..*.
The second weekly Lane Hall Cof-
fee Hour will be held from 4 to 6
p.m. tomorrow in Lane Hall. Miss
Olive Bainton, Youth Secretary of
the American Friends Service Com-
mittee, will be the honored guest, and
all members of the student body are
invited to attend, Joyce Siegan, so-
cial chairman of SRA announced
yesterday.
Assisting as hostesses will be Al-
lene Golinken and Martha Taylor.
Scholarship Dinner ...
Martha Cook Building will honor
residents with high academic stand-
ing at a formal Scholarship Dinner
to be held at 6 p.m. today.
Awards will be presented to women
receiving all A's, and the next ten
highest coeds will receive honorable
mention. Mrs. Evans Holbrook, of
the Martha Cook Building Board of
Governors, will make the awards.
Other guests will include Miss
Jeanette Perry, and Mrs. Mary Bro-
mage, assistant Deans of Women,
Prof. and Mrs. Everett Brown, Prof.
and Mrs. Edward Ham, and Miss
Ethel A. McCormick, social director
of the League.
Equestrians To Meet .. .
Crop and Saddle will meet today
at 6 p.m. in front of Barbour Gym.
All members are expected to be
present. Those who will be rushing
are excused.
Rinck To Give Recital .
Kathleen Rinck, School of Music,
will give the third piano recital at
8:30 p.m. Sunday in the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater.
The program will feature Beetho-
ven's Sonata, Op. 2, No. 3, Sonata,
Op. 31, No. 2 and Sonata, Op. 110.
Miss Rinck, who took a master's
degree in music at the University,
has taught piano at Whitworth Col-
lege, Brookhaven, Miss., and has held
the position of teaching assistant in
the School of Music since 1942.
Mead Investigates
Alcan Army Road
WASHINGTON, March 21-A)-
Chairman Mead (D.-N.Y.) announc-
ed today that the War Investigating
Committee has started an investiga-
tion of the Alcan highway.
Its immediate purpose, Mead de-

clared in a statement, is to deter-
mine what future plans the War De-
partment has with respect to this
Alaskan roadway, which was built
originally as a military project.

II

Inter-Guild To Worley Asks
H114 d Me.iForUnuorn
iTren gas

Co- Dscoverer of Sulfa Drugs
Is Now lJ Chemistrv Maior

NATIONAL WINNER:

Rev. tPickerill To afll
On Protestant Action
The second in a series of discussion-
teas on Protestant Action, sponsored
by the Inter-Guild Council of SRA
will be held from 4 to 5:30 p.m. to-
day in the library of Lane Hall when
Rev. H. L. Pickerill, representing the
Congregational-Disciples Guild, will
discuss "Congregationalists, Disci-
ples, and Protestant Action."
Each denominational group is re-
sponsible for one of the sessions
'when the respective religious leader
will present his approach to Protes-
tant cooperation. Following this pre-
sentation, there will be an open dis-
cussion among all those students
attending.
Meetings To Continue
These Thursday meetings will con-
tinue until May 17, and will be cli-
maxed by a delegated Spring Con.
ference May 25-27. The next dis-
cussion will be April 5 and will be
conducted by Rev. E. H. Redman of
the Unitarian Guild who will present
"The Unitarian Approach to Protes-
tant Action."
Other representatives of their de-
nominational groups who will be
guests on succeeding Thursdays are
Rev. W. P. Lemon of the Presbyterian
Church, Rev. H. O. Yoder represent-
ing the Lutheran Student Associa-
tion, Rev. A. T. Scheips of Gamma
Delta, Rev. J. B. Kenna of the Meth-
odist Church, Rev. T. R. Schmale of
the Evangelical and Reformed
Church, and Rev. Henry Lewis rep-
resenting the Canterbury Club of
St. Andrew's Episcopal Church.
Give Today To
The Ied Coss

1!bmiiits Report (aCo-discoverer of fou
SIR tflt~ toit~ Iat the age of 18 and
State Legislatures national acclaim, Eve
Following a request from the Ten- now majorg cherr
, nessee Legislature for a report and University, it was learn
study of existing carrier laws. John The nation's limeligh
Stuyofstigcrrie r laws.pohnaon Miss Pease when, in
S. Worley, professor of transporta- the Science Clubs of
tion engineering at the University of Westinghouse selectedI
Michigan has submitted a report to the 40 winners in thei
all state legislatures advocating uni- tion-wide search.
form carrier trucking laws. Judged for exceptio
Prof. Worley stated that highway aptitude, each winner i
conditions have improved since these to Washington to com
motor vehicle laws were adopted ,0other winnership.
making many of the laws unneces- Folowisghrhipt
sary restrictions that only contribute Following her trip te
s to the cost of transportation. Prof. a drug manufacturing c
Worley cited the restiictions caused home town, Evansville
by conflicting state carrier laws. Al- the young chemist to
though Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana
and Iowa allow a three-axle unit ~) ross
.truck to be 45 feet long, a truck :ISCII
traveling from Pennsylvania to Iowa
could only be 35 feet long because
Illinois law proclaims 35 feet to be
the maximum length of a three-axle
unit truck. An antiquated law in one First Reports
state also makes it necessary for aj
truck to carry much less than a Dorms Donate
capacity load.
Prof. Worley said that state legis- First reports received
latures could reduce the cost of ed that over $2,200 hast
transported goods rendering citizens by the League for the R
a service by making trucking laws Fund drive.
uniform. In announcing this In
- -- ----ure, Deborah Parry. '45
Voluii er Need eI the League drive, saidt
f V lu teers iecleLial total consisted mai
In Red Cross riVe"butions from the women
f i0houses which have rep
All students interested in taking iave showd 100 per c
ton.
Red Cross contributions at a local Stockwell, as the lar
theatre tomorrow, Friday, and Satur- campus, contributed w
day, please call Pat Coulter, 23159. required donation perc
Collections will be taken at 5:30, which is $568. Jordan
7:30, and 9:30 and the student volun- $250, Martha Cook wit
teer will gain free admittance to Barbour, $103, and He
the current movie. with $102.

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r sulfa drugs
Irecipient of 1
lyn Pease is l
mistry at the
ned yesterday.
t was focused
March, 1942,
America and
her as one of
r annual na-
nal scientificj
s given a trip
pete with the
nd prize of a
Washington,
concern in her
e, Ind., hired
work in its
Drive
2200
Indicate
c Most
today show-
been collected
Zed Cross War
ncomplete fig-
, chairman of
that the par-
nly of contri-
n's dorms. All
orted to date
cent coopera-,
gest dorm on
ell above the
coed of $1.25,
followed with
h $162, Betsy
len Newberry

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laboratories. Here Miss Pease helped
to discover four new sulfa drugs
which are still being tested for medi-
cal use. She was also engaged in
testing vitamin solutions for their
potence.
Although it is her major, chemis-
try is 'ar from 'her only interest.
She is a member of the Fencing Club
and likes to draw, write, swim and
ski.
Following graduation, she plans to
contirae sulfa drug research.
Piano Reciicda
ToBe Given by
Rubby KuhIlman
Selections by Brahms, Beethoven,
Scarlatti and Debussy will highlight
a piano recital to be given by Ruby
Kuhlman at 8:30 p. m. tomorrow in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Miss Kuhlman who has been ac-
companist for the Choral Union for
two years, is a member of Mu Phi
Epsilon, music society, and Mortar-
board and Senior Society, honor so-
cieties. She is now a pupil of Mabel
Ross Rhead; during the past two
summers she has participated in
master classes under Arthur Schna-
bel.
The recital is given in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for the
B. M. degree and is open to the pub-
lic.
BE SUAVE
We specialize in "Crew and Person-
ality" hair styles. They're different!
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty off state
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WASHINGTON, March 21--P)-
Grand Rapids and Jackson, have
been included among nine industrial
centers classified as group one areas
of -acute labor shortage, the War
Manpower Commission announced
today.

f

(Continued from Page 2)
quested to attend a joint meeting
with the Board of Governors, Pro-
Lessor W. A. McLaughlin, phairman.
This will be a social rather than a
business meeting.
Contemporary Jewish History Class:
There will be a meeting of the Con-
temporary Jewish History Class to-
day at the Hillel Foundation at 7:30
p.m. Mr. Max Dresden is the in-
structor. All interested persons are
invited to attend.
The Regular Thursday Evening
Record Concert will be held in the
Ladies Lounge of the Rackham Buil-
ding at 7:45 p.m. An all-Beethoven
program will be featured including
the Leonora Overture, Concerto No. 4
in G Major, and the 9th Symphony.
All graduate students are cordially
invited to attend.
Coming Events
The Geological Journal Club will
meet in Rm. 3065, Nat. Sci. Bldg. at
12:15 p.m. on Friday, March 23.
Program: M. W. Senstius will review
"Mining in the Netherlands East
Indies" by A. L. ter Braake. All
interested are cordially invited to
attend.
American Power: To What End?
will be the topic of a talk to be given
by Prof. William B. Willcox of the
History Department at the religious
services at 7:45 p.m. Friday, March
23, in the Hillel Foundation.
Society of Women Engineers: There
will be a meeting on Saturday,
March 24 at 1:15 p.m. in the League.

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