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February 20, 1944 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1944-02-20

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20, 1944

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE TtTRE

--=

POST-WAR EXPANSION:
Newly Appointed Dean Gives Plans

By SELIG ESTROFF
"Although we will have the job of
using our staff in training the armed
services for the duration of the war,
we plan a large expansion of the
school once the war is over," said
Russell A. Stevenson, newly appoint-
ed dean of the School of Business
Administration, who will assume his
new duties at the University about
July 1.
Commenting on plans which he
wishes to carry out in his new post,
Dean Stevenson, who will succeed
Dean Clare E. Griffin, continued,
"We are preparing for a greatly ex-
panded post-war enrollment and our
most pressing need after the war
Will be the expansion of the school's
physical facilities. We will also have
to expand the faculty greatly to take
care of the increased enrollment."
Author of Textbooks
Dean Stevenson is considered to be
one of the most successful business
school heads in the country. He is
past president of the American Asso-
ciation of Collegiate Schools of Bus-
iness and is the author of several
textbooks and many articles in the
field of accountancy and economics.
In 1916 he was co-author with Prof.
W. A. Paton of the University of the
textbook "Principles of Accounting."
The Employment Stabilization Re-
search Institute has besen directed

by Dean Stevenson since 1931. This
institute has been very successful in
coordinating the work of engineers,
economists and other groups in the
investigation of business and eco-
nomic problems of the country.
An alumnus of the University of
Michigan, Dean Stevenson received
a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1913,
taught here as instructor in 1913-14,
and returned to get the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy in 1919. Since
then he has taught at the Universi-
ties of Iowa and Cincinnati and has
been dean of the business school at
the University of Minnesota since
1926. In 1941 the University of Mich-
igan conferred upon him the doctor-
ate of law, the highest honor which
it presents. Dean Stevenson is the
only member of the faculty of the
University to possess this honor.
Points Out Lacks
Impressed by the excellent bus-
iness library of the school, Dean
Stevenson pointed out the inade-
quate housing for the collection and
the generally inadequate facilities for
the rest of the school.
"The schools of business which
now are scattered throughout the
United States arose out of the last
World War," Dean Stevenson added,
"and we should expect another rapid
expansion of business schools when
this war is over. The University of

Michigan is located in an extremely
strategical territory in relationship
to industry in the United States and
in the world. This affords the bus-
iness students with an unusually
good laboratory," he said.
Dean Stevenson also believes that
business activities in the state of
Michigan are destined for tremen-
dous expansion and that students
should be interested in this in respect
to their education. It is understood
that the University authorities are
in full accord with Dean Stevenson's
plans.
Ruthvens WillHold Tea
Mrs. Alexander G. Ruthven will
hold an invitation tea for the collec-
tion of clothes and shoes for the re-
lief of Norway from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
March 1 in her home.
Each guest is asked to bring a
gift of clothes, either new or used
clothing that has been cleaned and
mended. New or repaired used shoes
are also requested.
USO SYMPOSIUM PLANNED
"Minority Peoples in America-an
Appreciation" will be the subject of
a symposium to be held at 3 p.m.
today at "the USO, corner of State
and East Huron.

Church Guilds
Hold Meetings
Religious Clubs Will
Conduct Social Hour
Concluding the series of "What I
Believe," the Wesleyan Foundation
will discuss "Winning Others" at 5
p.m. today at the Methodist Church.
Congregationalists and Disciples
will hold a brief worship program at
5 p.m. at the Guild House instead of
meeting at the church. A social hour
with recorded music and refresh-
ments will follow.
Westminster Guild will hear Dean
Erich Walter speak on "Building a
Christian Home-the First Year of
Marriage," at 6 p.m. at the Presby-
terian Church. Fellowship hour and
supper will precede the meeting.
Mrs. L. E. Swain, president of the
Women's American Baptist Foreign
Mission Society, will address the
Roger Williams Guild and other
church organizations at 5 p.m. today.
Her topic will be "Paying Big Divi-
dends."
There will be a supper meeting of
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, at 5:30 p.m. at the Student
Center. The Lutheran Student Asso-
ciation will hold a Bible study and
worship service at 5:30 in the Zion
Parish Hall.
After the choral evening prayer
service at the Episcopal Church,
Canterbury Club members will have
supper at 6 p.m.

Allied Air Force Chief

INDIAN ARTIFACTS:
Ohio Valley Is Site for Report
On Archaeological Research

In an interview yesterday, Dr.
James Bennet Griffin of the Museum
of Anthropology stated that the mat-
erial for his book, "The Fort Ancient
Aspect," a report of archeological re-
search in this area, was obtained
from Fort Ancient, the archeological
name for the prehistoric Ohio Valley.
"American archeology is the his-
torical science which deals with the
fragmentary and fortuitous rem-
nants of former Indian communities.
The book is a synthesis of Fort An-
cient archeological data gathered
from 1850 through 1939 in the Middle
Ohio area, which was the best known
center of archeological activity at
the turn of the century," he contin-
ued.
Data Tells of Indian Culture
The data used to determine the
story of the growth of Indian culture
in the New World. They brought
recognition of the cultural groups
which were the ancestors of the Am-
erican Indian of the Eastern United
States.
"The main body of the report," Dr.
Griffin said, "contains a series of
brief descriptions of the artifacts dis-
covered during the excavations and

' _.__

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Maj. Gen. William 0. Butler
(above), who commanded Army
and Navy Air Forces in Alaska
when the Japs were driven from,
the Aleutians, has been named
Deputy Commander in Chief of the
the Allied Air Forces operating out
of England for the forthcoming in-
vasion.
Administrative
Political Science
Course Open
Students who elect Political Sci-
ence 272 next term will practicaly be
assured of a job in public adminis-
trative management, Dr. Edward
Litchfield of the political science de-
partment said recently.
Dr. Litchfield, who is assistant
state director of the Michigan Civil
Service Commission, pointed out
that in 1942 there were eight times
as many jobs as there were graduates
in the field of personal administra-
tion.
The course, which originally was
planned only to graduate students,
is now open to undergraduates. The
class next term will be held for three
hours either Thursday evening or
Saturday morning.

a

the features of the individual sites
or of the surface collections from
them."
Pottery Given Consideration
"Pottery has been given the most
detailed consideration in this report.
Decorations and surface finish of the
objects are the two most useful char-
acteristics for purposes of study," he
continued.
Archeologists look for excavation
sites where food can be grown and
water and transportation are conve-
nient, for Indians lived in those plac-
es which are accessible to the neces-
sities of life just as white men do. In
Madisonville, largest of the sites,
there are relics dating into the his-
toric period, or the period after 1700
when the first white men came into
the valley.
Band To Hold Rehearsals
Concert band rehearsals for the
spring term will be as follows? Mon-
day, Thursday, full rehearsal-4:15-
5:45 p.m.: Tuedaysection rehearsal
(alternate weeks) --4:15-5:45 p.m.:
Wednesday. full rehearsal--7:30-9:3
p.m.
The first regular rehearsal will be
Monday, March 6, at 4:15 p.m.
)UTH" Contributes to the
fashion picture of Today
4 RAYON "WARNEEN"
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A girdle made of spun rayon
a softly molding fabric with a
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a "Warneen" girdle and matching
r factory coveralls, any uniform,
dress.
N BUREN hop
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pure virgin wool.
Navy and white, navy and red,
red and navy. 10 to 18
Sports Shop95
Pure wool skirts, pleats and Long sleeve shirt, of rayon
gores, pastel plaids and crepe in white and pastel
solid colors. Shetlands. shades. Sports shop.

s
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Warner's "YO
functional3
with SPUN
A functional fash
war work days.
"Warneen." It's
"different" look-
You will wanta
bra to wear under
or tailored suit or

J27Ih

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ALL COLORS
ALL WOOL
ALL STYLES
Y'OURS NOW, from this all-
ction of timeless beauties,
priced for this era'of sensible

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5.95 and

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Soft fleeces of pure virgin wool,
single- and double-breasted models,
slash pockets, or patch pockets.
Over your sports clothes or suits.
The colors ... purple, gold, red, blue, aqua

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vtt ;: %;

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Coat room.
Jersey
long s
rd

29-9,

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spending.
SUITS that are really products of art
try . . . with all the ingenious imagin
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styling you adore. They'll put a nF
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Classic . . . tailored
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Sizes for juniors, 9-17; misses
and women, 10-44, 161/2-241/2
from 25.00 to 59.95
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leeves
5,95

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SUITS too with matching toppers at 29.95
DON'T FORGET
TO BUY A WAR STAMP A DAY
FOR THE MAN WHO'S AWAY

4

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