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January 08, 1944 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Furlough Plan
Urged for Men
Long Overseas
Taft Requests Leave
Rotation for Soldiers
In Foreign Service
WASHINGTON, Jan. 7. - (P) -
Amid reports that the Army is mov-
ing to relieve troops in isolated out-
posts, Senate Democrats and Repub-
licans joined today in urging the es-
tablishment of a furlough system for
battle-weary men long overseas.
Senator Taft (Rep., Ohio) tol a
reporter he believed the War De-
partment should make some provi-
sion for short furloughs for men who
had seen at least two years of foreign
service. He suggested the possibility
of a rotation system which would let
one man out of four in a designated
unit come home for a month or more.
On his return, another would be given
leave.
Senator Radcliffe (Dem., Md.) said
he too, felt that arrangements could
be made for furloughs that would not
interfere with the war effort.
Congress heard informally that the
Army already has acted to replace
many of its garrisons in Alaska, the
Caribbean, Iceland and other out-
posts in this hemisphere.
Members of Congress said their
mail is full of appeals from parents
for furloughs for their sons, but most
pgislators thought no attempt would
ie made to enact legislation on the
subject. The general disposition was
to leave the decision to the high
command.
Both Taft and Radcliffe said the
chief problem was use of shipping
that otherwise might be carrying
troops or supplies. Taft added that
there also was the question of wheth-
er experienced fighting units should
be broken up.
Interviews To
Be Held Today
"Final interviews for freshman wo-
men for positions on the '47 Corps
central committee and for upperclass-
men interested in being orientation
advisors will be held from 9 to 12
a.m. today, Anne MacMillan, '44,
president of Judiciary Council, an-
.nounced yesterday.
Coeds appointed to head '47 Corps
will be given the opportunity to make
all arrangements for an all-campus
dance to benefit the Bomber Scholar-j
ship fund. This is the first time
in University history that first sem-
ester freshmen have had a class
project.
The interviews will be held in the
undergraduate offices of the League.

Yanks Capture Jap Air Field at Saldor

Co. C Musical
Comedy Goes

intoProducin
i RehearsalsOnOriginal
Play, 'Bidin' Our Time' 1
Will Start Monday
Co. C's musical comedy, "Bidin'
Our Time," will enter actual produc-
tion Monday as the soldiers will re-
turn from furlough tomorrow.t
The play, an original musical com-
edy, deals with the fortunes and mis-
fortunes that befell a group of ASTP
students who are inadvertently sent
to an all-girls' college.
The music has been composed and
arranged by Corp. Troy Bartlett and'
the lyrics by Corp. Hy Wolotsky who
has also written the book and scenario
with Pfc. Pat Thomas and Sgt. Rob-
ert Paulsen respectively. Pfc. Thom-
as will portray the role of the un-
fortunate Army Colonel who is har-
assed mercilessly by the college's
Dean of Women.
"Bidin' Our Time" will have to be
rehearsed during the soldiers' free
hours due to Army regulations that
the men devote prescribed hours to
study outside of class.
Work on the show is continuing
despite the fact that the men are
away from campus on furlough.
Corp. Bartlett has been arranging
the music while Corp. Wolotsky has
been brushing up the book for the
show.
According to Corp Wolotsky, pro-
duction supervisor, the cast will be
completed, a theatre gotten, and
dates set for the performance as
soon as the men return to campus.
He intends to begin rehearsals on
Wednesday.
The show is scheduled for some-
time during the last week in Febru-
ary.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)

Prof. Williams
To Speak on
Rui tTuiesdty
Pof. Mentor William. of the Eng-
lish department will speak on "Rus-
sia" at an open meeting of the Rus-
sian War Relief Committee at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday in the Sarah Hender-
son Room of the League.
Prof. John L. Brumm of the jour-
nalism department will be chairman
of the meeting. Mrs. Lila Pargment
will report on the work accomplished
by the sewing, salvage, and knitting
committees.
Two short Russian documentary
films will be shown-"One Hundred
Million Russian Women at the Front,"
and "Russian People," a picturization
on the reconstruction of Moscow.
The public is invited to attend.

Two houses on campus will hold
post-holiday dances tonight.
Alpha Tau Omega uratferni:
planning a dance to be held fro;.;9j
prm. to midnight at 1923 Geddes,
Chaperons will be Mr. Karl Brenkerti
Sr.. and Mrs. A. Bek.

There will be a dance given at the
Sheta Deita 0tI frate^rniity- Chapter
house 0 South State Strect, from
9 p.iii to midnight Prof and Mrs.
F. F Bareianlld Prof. and Mi: W T.
Enmlons will chaperon.

Two Campus Houses Hold Dances Tonight

DON'T LET THE

AXIS HAVE OUR TAXES!

BUY WAR BONDS-INVEST IN VICTORY

-

I

Yanks of the 32nd Infantry Division from the Midwest leave a
landing craft to make an unopposed landing at Saldor, New Guinea,
resulting in the capture of a Japanese air field. (AP Wirephoto from
Signal Corps Radiophoto.)
TANKS IN THE WAR:
Prof. Miller Discusses New
Aspectsof Offensive Warfare

Different ways have been discov-
ered to meet and, in a large measure,
nullify the tank as an offensive weap-
on, according to a recent article writ-
ten by Prof. Henry W. Miller in the
Michigan Alumnus Quarterly Review.
Prof. Miller has been head of the
department of mechanism and en-
gineering drawing since 1921. A Col-
onel in the Ordinance Reserve Corps,
U.S.A., for many years he has been
active as an expert on artillery and
his services have been called upon by
the Army many times. He is the
author -of several books on military
subjects and has made many studies
of modern artillery.
Warfare Means Constant
In an article entitled "After the
Tank, What?" he says that the
science of warfare has never changed'
and never will. Warfare is a processj
of subjecting one's enemy to one's will
by violence, or the threat of it.
Prof. Miller lists four principles or
elements involved in the science of
warfare which can never change. The
first is that the addition of someI
hard object to the hand, an object
that would cut, pierce or bruise would
make the hand more effective in

harming one's enemy than the fist.
This is called "arming the hand."
Secondly, it was comprehended that
hand-to-hand combat was so danger-
ous that the slow, the dull-witted,
and the inexpert had little chance.
It was therefore very desirable to get
one's foe at as great a distance as
possible., This was done with the
bow - and - arrow, the javelin, the
throwing spear or the sling.
The third principle or element of
warfare which the human wits com-
prehended was the desirability to the
point of necessity of covering a very
vulnerable body with some kind of
protection, a shield, a barrier of
stones or wood, or the protection of a
tree or trench. '
Psychological Element
The fourth element or principle
which is comprehended is psychologi-
cal rather than material. It is the
condition of disconcertion produced
in one's adversary by surprise or
speed of attack based on the principal
that if surprised or terrified the mind
seems to lose its capacity for quick
eu-ordination of efforts and may be
unable to adopt the right plan of de-
fense or attack in the short time al-
lowed and thereby become increas-
ingly vulnerable to attack.
The tank was first used in the
first World War. But it remained for
a very few men in the French, the
British, and the American armies to
see, even so recently as 1938, the part
that the tank might play in the ini-
tial stages of an all-out war. It
would be a device embodying all four
of the principles of warfare, that of
the armed hand, the lengthened arm,
protection and the disconcerting ef-
fect of speed of action, the equivalent
of surprise.

I

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The University

Musical

Society

CONCERTS
CHORAL UNION SERIES
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN
Tuesday, January 18, 8:30
MARJORIE LAWRENCE
Sunday, January 30, 3:00 P.M.
MISCHA ELMAN
Thursday, February 10, 8:30
EZIO PINZA
Monday, March 6, 8:30
A LIMITED NUMBER OF TICKETS are available for
each of the above concerts at $2.75, $2.20, $1.65 and $1.10
(tax included)

ond in series on the Lord's Prayer,
"Hallowed Be Thy Name."
First Church of Christ, Scientist:
Wednesday evening service at8:00,
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Sacrament." Sunday school
at 11:40 a.m.
Free Reading Room at 106 E.
Washington St. where the Bible' and
the writings of Mary Baker Eddy
may be read, borrowed or purchased.
Hours daily, except Sundays and hol-
idays, 11:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Satur-
days to 9 o'clock.
Grace Bible Fellowship: Masonic
Temple. 10:00 a.m. University Bible
Class. Ted Groesbeck, teacher. 11:00
a.m. Message by the pastor, Rev. H.
J. DeVries, "Many Went Balk." Ex-
pository studies from John's Gospel.
7:30 p.m. "As the Lord Thought To
Do."
Zion Lutheran Church: Worship
services will be held Sunday at 10:30
a.m. The Rev. E. C. Stellhorn will
deliver the sermon.
Trinity Lutheran Church will have
its worship services Sunday at 10:30
a.m. Sermon by the Rev. Henry 0.
Yoder'.
Ann Arbor Society of Friends:
Meeting for worship on Sunday at
5:00 p.m. in the Upper Room of Lane
Hall. Discussion nmeeting, 6:00-7:00
First Presbyterian Church: Morn-
ing worship at 10:45 a.m. Subject of
Dr. W. P. Lemon's sermon will be
"Dialogues of the Soul."
Westminster Student Guild supper
and fellowship hour at 6:00 p.m. fol-
lowed by a devotional meeting.

The ENSIAN is a
"must buy now!"
Find your picture,
it's a wow!'

I

finPere led'?

Also the

I

ROTH QUARTET
in the Fourth lnumial
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
Three Concerts in Rackhan Bulding
q'ROGRAMS

TRYOUTS WANTED
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
IN
NEWSPAPER MANAGEMENT
and ADVERTISING

QUARTET
QUARTET
QUARTET

Friday, January 21, 8:30
IN E-FLAT MAJOR. y ...,.-
IN F . . . . . . . . . . .
IN D MINOR . . . .......
Saturday, January 22, 2:30

. Haydn
Ravel
Schubert

SEVEN CHORALE, PRELUDES . . . .
QUARTET IN F MAJOR, OP. 135 . .. .
FIRST STRING QUARTET . . . .
Saturday, January 22, 8:30

. . < Bach
. Beethoven
- . Csela

III

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