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June 14, 1944 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-14

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 1944

'"HE MICHIGAN I 3 l.A.... 3 ~P 3 A.! .LP t.

'writor"

,arsit r L{~ da yt 1\

- * dE 1'4 F I

5I

Six Linksmen
Receive Major
Letter Awards
Jenswold, Marcellus,
Tews and Messinger
Complete Select Group
By BOB CLINTON'
Coach Ray Courtright announced
yesterday that varsity letter awards
would be presented to six members of
the 1944 golf squad that captured the
Western Conference Championship
two weeks ago.
The following linksmen will receive
"M's": John Jenswold, Duluth, Minn.,
Phil Marcellus, Rockford, Ill., Tom
Messinger, Houghton, Mich., Duncan
Noble, Ann Arbor, Mich., Paul
O'Hara, Detroit, Mich., and John
Tew4, Bay City, Mich.
Jenswold, a V12 student, who came
from Michigan Tech last July, was
an average golfer during the season
and didn't come into his own until
just before the conference matches.
In the last dual match of the season
he "red an 18-hole total of 74, and
then went on to become individual
Big Ten champion. He fired a ter-
rific opening round score of 72, but
sagged to an 81 in the afternoon for a
36-hole card of 153.
Jenswold is Veteran Golfer
Jenswold earned his letter on the
hockey sextet last winter, and be-
came a member of the golf team
when someone discovered that he had
been playing since the age of "ve
under expert tutoring.
Marcellus captained the Wolver-
ines throughout the year and was the
only returning letter-man when the
season started. Early in the season
it was "Marcy's" spirit that held the
team together, and when the all-im-
portant matches came around, it was
his previous experience that made
him a steady golfer. At the confer-
ence sweepstakes he was runner-up
for individual honors as he "red a 15.
Messinger is Asset to Team
A definite asset to this year's team
was Messinger. Like Jenswold, he
is in the V12 and earned a letter in
hockey last winter. He played a
steady game of golf from the open-
ing match with U. of D. right through
to the Big Ten tournament when he!
aided the victorious Wolverines with
a 159.
Tews completes the foursome that
played most of the golf this year.
Throughout the season he was one
of the Wolverines top-notch golfers
and shot a 156 to bolster Michigan
at the Big Ten meet.
Noble Joins Armed Services
Duncan Noble was a veteran of
last year's team and after playing in
several matches, quit school to devote
his services to the nation. Paul
O'Hara the sixth letter winner, was
a good golfer all year, but never
quite made the top Wolverine four-
some.
Secondary awards were presented
to Ken Berke, Milwaukee, Wis., Don
Larson, Flint, Mich., Ken Morey,
Western Springs, Ill., Bill Telfer, Port
Huron, Mich., and Robert Welling,
Detroit, Mich.

i

I

Varsity Nine Completes
Conference Competition
Friday, Saturday Contests to Ring Down
Curtain After Successful Diamond Campaign

4,

By BILL MULLENDORE
With the Western Conference base-
ball championship already safely in
Ann Arbor by virtue of the double
win over Purdue last Saturday, and
a season's record of 15 victories, two
losses and one tie in 18 starts, Mich-
igan is assurred of one of the most
successful diamond campaigns in its
history.
Two games remain on the Wolver-
ine schedule consisting of single
games Friday And Saturday with
Western Michigan at Kalamazoo. As
Coach Ray Fisher's lads have al-
ready handed the Broncos a pair of
shellackings earlier in the season, a
successful conclusion of the schedule
is in prospect.
Blanchard Falls Below .400'
The two Purdue tilts saw several
Wolverines raise their batting aver-
ages and also saw a three-point boost
in the team average, although Bruce
Blanchard fell from the ranks of the
elite .400 group for the first time
since the season opened.
It was not Blanchard's fault, how-
ever, as he hit into tough luck all
day, driving several hard hit balls
into the hands of waiting fielders.
The most sensational rise was that
of Bob Wiese, who zoomed almost 70
Fielding Averages
O A E Pct.
Lund, cf ........40 0 0 1.000
Nussbaumer, rf.. 17 0 0 1.000
Wiese, rf, p .... 11 10 0 1.000
Swanson, 1b . . . .164 5 2 .988
Gregor, If....... 22 1 1 .958
Farnyk, 3b .... 15 22 2 .948
Stevenson, c . .... 86 11 6 .943
Blanchard, ss .. 36 44 9 ,899
Ketterer, 2b .... 36 42 9 .896
TOTALS .. . .427 135 29 .951

points from .296 to .364 by collecting
four hits in six times at bat.
In the hurling department, it is
interesting to note that opposing
batsmen "have collectedonly about
half as many hits as the Michigan
sluggers, indicating the tightness of
the hurling.
Bowman Pitches Air-Tight Ball
Bo Bowman gave up one earned
run in the first game to bring his
average to 1.12 per nine-inning game.

LOVE:
Pauline Betz
Nears Court
Championship
DETROIT, June 13.-(A)- Top-
seeded Pauline Betz of Los Angeles
and Francisco (Pancho) Segura of
Coral Gables, Fla., won opening vic-
tories today in what may be a march
to national clay court tennis cham-
pionships.
Miss Betz, who with Segura had a
first round bye, started defenseof
her title at the Detroit tennis club
with a 6-0, 6-0 decision over Ruth
Miho of Los Angeles. All eight seeded
players reached the quarter-finals in
women's singles, and tomorrow Miss
Betz meets Shirley Fry of Akron, O.,
who defeated Constance Ebbers of
Detroit, 6-2, 6-1. ,
The colorful Segura, slated to seize
the championship relinquished by
Seymour Greenberg of Chicago who
now is in the armed forces, gained an
easy 6-0, 6-2 victory over Mack Tay-
lor, University of Detroit's No. 1
player.
Billy Talbert of Indianapolis, seed-
ed No. 2, trimmed Gene Vash of
Chicago, 6-1, 6-2, and third ranking
Rex Norris of Lansing, Mich., downed
Alexander Hetzeck of Hamtramck,
Mich., 6-3, 6-1.
In the feminine division, second
seeded Doris Hart of Miami contrib-
uted another impressive performance
while defeating Mary Lou Beyer of
Detroit, 6-1, 6-2, and meets sixth
ranking Catherine Wolf of Elkhart,
Ind., who came from behind to beat
Mary Hernando of Detroit, 3-6, 6-3,
6-2.
Third ranking Dorothy May Bundy
of Santa Monica, Calif., polished off
Gloria Thompson of St. Louis, 6-0,
6-1, and faces Constance Clifton of
New Smyrna Beach, Fla., who de-
feated Mildred Sirwaites of Detroit,
6-0, 6-3. Miss Clifton is No. 8.
Major League
Standingys

ON THE IREBOUND
byo Ann Peterson

SPORTSWRITERS have about as
givemuch prestige as mules. Horses
give the long-eared mule a well-bred
sneer, and donkeys give them a
merry hee-haw. Athletes look on
sportswriters as lowly drudges or as
disappointed athletes, while news-
writers look on the sportscrbenas a
kind ,of slangy, muscular mutant.
Perhaps the views of both the
newswriter and the athlete are jus-
tified, but they are not both true
without qualification. The sports-
writer, it is true, has a certain
jargon. The baseball fan is not
permitted to read a straight write-
up with everyone hitting or not
hitting. He is treated to a series of
"smashes," "drives," and "clips."
He not only sees his home team
beaten but he sees it "trounced,"
"routed" and "trimmed." When
the team wins it may just as well
"grab the game," or "clinch it," or
even "clean up'" on the opposing
squad.
Athletic equipment may seem com-.
paratively simple to most people.
There's usually a ball in the game-
and an implement of some kind-
but nothing too fancy. In the hands
of the sportswriter these plain ma-
terials turn into "pills." "sticks,"
"Pigskins" and "clubs." There's no-
thing simple about it any more, and
the sportswriter is looked upon as a
sort of whimsical oracle who goes out
of his way to express things the hard
way.
As a matter of fact, in nine cases
out of ten, the sportswriter is not
to blame. The doctor who, in his
report, diagnoses a case as an up-
per respiratory infection, is not
labeled a fool because he chooses
to use the technical vocabulary to
describe what may well be a com-
mon cold. So it is with sportswrit-
ers, who are usually using the
terms that are as authentic and
technical in the sports world. For
the most part the terms are well-
recognized within the ranks of the
sport, and the fact that they appear
in print is because the sportswriter,
like any other reporter, is anxious
to write the news as he sees it, in
terms that fit the sport.

NEWSWRITERS and, occasional
readers of the sports page attrib-
ute this 'use of slang tx) a careless,
racy style, perhaps not quite in the
best traditions of news writing, but,
like any other writing, ;ports writing
requires a certain vocabulary, and
because of this fact, the man who is
covering a sport is as anxious to give
the story a full represen tation of the
sporting facts as is possible through
the use of his special, workable vo-
cabulary.
From the athlete's point of view
the sportswriter may :appear to be
a mere recorder of other men's
athletic glories. However, what the
athlete fails to realize! is that the
sportswriter, like m any another
fan, is as sincerely interested in
sports as the athlete, that he has a
definite understanding- and feeling
for the games he is 4e overing, andj
that, not only is he capable of
enjoying a sport, butt he is also
interested in seeing that other
people, through the mntdium -of the
printed page, have the same oppor-
tunity.
In many cases, the i portswriter is
an athlete himself. 'Many of the
writers on The Daily staff for exam-
ple, have won letters in sports, and
some of them have beam outstanding
members of their squads. It is not
just a vicarious thrill that the sports-
writer gets out of athletic contests,
but is also a creative interest in get-
ting the righ twist to a story which
will make the contest alive to the
reader.
Sportswriters are not hacks.
They are usually as alive to the
major issues of the day as any
other newswriter. In some cases
they have highly trained interests
in other fields, but have turned to
sportswriting because of the fact
that there is always something in-
teresting and new happening in the
sports world.
They may over-use jargon, they
may seem at times like a group of
weary, worn-down sports bums, but
the fact remains that sportswriters
are trying to put something across on
paper, which is as much a part of
the life of any average American as
is toothpaste.r

NAAU Track
Meet To Draw
Galaxy of Stars
Davis Not To Compete;
Buddy Young of Illinois
Is Favored in Sprints
NEW YORK. June 13.-(P)-They'll
be in front of the spectators little
more than ten seconds but the spring
field in the coming National AAU
Track and Field Championships at
Randall Island is one of the show's
major talking points.
Although Hal Davis, California
comet of the past few years and the
defending champion, won't be able
to compete because of Marine duties,
Dan Ferris thinks the present field
is as good as any in the 56 years
of the meet.
Young and Conwell Are Favorites
Claude (Buddy) Young, Illinois
whirlwind, and Eddie Conwell, New
York University bullet, are favored in
most circles because of their previous
front rank competition but Lt. Jim
O'Reilly of South California and
schoolboy Charles Parker of San An-
tonio, Tex., also are in the lime-
light.
O'Reilly, despite his naval duties,
recently pumped through a 100-yard
test at Chase Field, Calif., in :09.5
and was credited with :21.3 for the
220. Western coaches say that if he
is in condition he is the class of
all present-day dashmen.
Parker Has .49 Straight Wins
It will be Parker's first venture in
big time racing. The youngster, ear-
marked for Texas University, has
won 49 consecutive races and has a
:09.5 clocking for the century and a
startling :20.6 for the furlong.
With the metric system in use at
the finals Sunday, Parker may have
an advantage in that the century
actually will be 109 yards.
Other likely contestants are Eulace
Peacock, Barney Ewell and Herb
Thompson, all of whom have held
National titles in their prime but are
now sandwiching their practice ses-
sions between military tasks.

I

Batting

Averages

- i

G
Manko .......... 2
Hirsch .......... 7
Blanchard.......18
Wiese ...........14
Nussbaumer .....15
Gregor .........17
Lund ...........18
Swanson ........18
Schmidtke .......2
Phelps .......... 7
Farnyk .........15
Bowman .........7'
Ketterer ........18
Stevenson .......18
Kell ............ 8
Nelson ...........1
Hackstadt .......1
TEAM ..........18
OPPONENTS ...18

AB
3
23
72
33
41
65
60,
60
4
4
57
23
65
64
12
2
1
588
555

H
2
9
27
12
14
22
18
17
1
1
14
5
14
12
2
0
0
173
95,

Pct.
.667
.391
.375
.364
.341
.338
.300
.283
.250
.250
.246
.217
.215
.188
.167
.000
.000
.294
171

BOB WIESE
Hirsch gave up two to register a slight
increase to 1.333. Both records are
especially commendable.
Final compilation of the fielding
averages show three Wolverines, Don
Lund, Bob Nussbaumer and Wiese,
with perfect percentages. In inter-
preting these figures it must be con-
sidered that infielders accept more
and harder chances than outfielders,
and that some spots in the infield
are harder to play than others.
The team average of .951 shows the
airtight support given the Wolverine
hurlers, which made many of their,
victories possible.
Dick Callahan Receives
Large Bonus with Bosox
NEW ORLEANS, June 13.-W)-
Richard A. Callahan, father of 19-
year-old Dick Callahan, high school
pitcher, who yesterday signed a base-
ball contract with the Boston Red
Sox, disclosed today that his son was
given a bonus of $15,000 for joining
the Red Sox organization.

National League W. L. Pct.
*St. Louis .......32 15 .681
Pittsburgh ......26 19 .578
Cincinnati......25 23 .521
New York .......25 24 :510
Brooklyn ........24 26 .480
Boston ..........23 30 .434
Philadelphia ... .19 27 .413
*Chicago .......16 26 .381
Does not include night game.

GB.
5
7
8
9
12
122
13

~

TUESDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 2 (Call-
ed at end of five inning, rain).
Brooklyn 9, New York 4.
Boston 2-7, Philadelphia 1-8.
Chicago at St. Louis, night.

- -
SPECIAL NOTICE!
We are giving away today a self-starting electric alarm clock to the first
person to buy a $1,000 war bond! We will also give away one regular
alarm clock with each $500 war bond bought today.
FOR YOUR OWN GOOD AND FOR THAT OF YOUR COUNTRY,
BUY WAR BONDS!
MARSHALL'S DRUG STORE

American League W.
St. Louis .........29
Boston..... ...26
Detroit ..........25
Cleveland .......25
Chicago ........22
*New York ......22
*Washington' . ...23
Philadelphia . . ..22

L.
23
23
25
26
23
23
26
25

Pet.
.528
.531
.500
.490
.489
.489
.469
.468

GB.
2
3
3
3
3 /
4
41/

I

rt erJ
PRESIDENTIAL AGENT -

y
,, .
r , is}"
S
./ .} 1.
. . .:.

UPTON SINCLAIR.....

3.00

TEN YEARS IN JAPAN - JOSEPH GREW....................3.75
THE HEART OF JADE --SALVADORE MADARIAGA 3.00
WILDERNESS TREK - ZANE GREY.. .... 2.50
LAKE HURON (AMERICAN LAKE SERIES) - FRED LANDON .. 3.50
THIS IS YOUR WAR - ERNIE ,PYLE ....................... 3.00
TROUBLE SHOOTER - ROBERT TRAVER . ... ...... . 2.75
D DAY - JOHN GUNTHER .............................. 3.00
A WAR ATLAS FOR AMERICANS....................I.00

1
T'

ooC
MICH IGAN

ALUMNUS

1Joins a local Universit of Michigan Club
There are 150 of these Clubs in all parts of the world.
They have their social programs and they initiate activi-
ties for the benefi t of their members, their communi ties
Alumni.
3. Reads the Michigan Alumnus

'Does not include night game.
'UESDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit at Cleveland, rain.
St. Louis 5, Chicago 3.
Philadelphia 2, Boston 7.

New York at Washington, .iight.

I

i

LONG SHIPS PASSING - WALTER HAVIGHURST..........
THE.MIRACLE OF AMERICA - ANDRE MAUROIS..........
THE REPUBLIC - CHARLES BEARD......................
UNDERCOVER -- JOHN ROY CARLSON...... ............ .
THE KING LWETH - JEFFERY FARNOF ..................
FAIR STOOD THE MIND FOR FRANCE - H. E. BATES...... .
SEA EAGLE - JAMES ALDRICH ......................... .
THE BOWL OF BRACS - PAUL WELLMAN.............. . . .

3.00
3.50
3.00

Every Alumni

Class has its officers and

its program.

3.50
2.50
2.50
2.50
2.75

A Reunion is held once every five years on the Campus.
2. Concerns himself with his Class Organization

The magazine is issued 26 times each year and is the

chief liaison agency between the

University

end its

I NEVER LEFT HOME - BOB HOPE................. .

1.00

And other good HUMOROUS stories.
Good selection of MYSTERY stories.

and their University.
4. Remem bers always that he is a Michigan Man

I I

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