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June 10, 1944 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1944-06-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PFi. GE TES

gATUUDAY, JUNE 10, 1944PAGE THREE

Nine

To Meet Purdue in Double Bill Here

Today

Michigan

Track Squad Sends

Five

To

Run

in

NCAA Meet

Split Will Assure Wolverines
Eighth Big Ten Title of Year
Bowman, Hirsch To Be Starting Pitchers;
Iimm, Kennedy 'o Hurl for Boilermakers
By BILL MULLENDORE
Michigan's eighth Western Conference championship of the 1943-44
athletic season will hang in the balance this afternoon when Coach Ray
Fisher's baseball team takes the field in a doubleheader with Purdue at
1:30 p. m. on Ferry Field.
The Wolverines must gain at least a split in the two games to retain
their stranglehold on the Big Ten crown and become the eighth squad
to bring Conference laurels to Ann Arbor this year. If successful, the nine
will have the honor of bringing to a close perhaps the most successful
campairn in Wolverines athletic history.

Fisher yesterday named his two
ace pitchers, Bo Bowman and El-
roy Hirsch, for the starting as-
signments in the two tilts. Follow-
ing earlier precedent, the diminu-
tive Bowman will work the first
contest and Hirsch will step in and
hurl the nightcap.
Boilermaker coach "Pop" Doan is
expected to counter with .his number
one chucker, Ed Timm, in the open-
er against Bowman and follow up
with Jack Kennedy opposing Hir-
sch. Timm is generally regarded as
one, of the better pitchers around the
Big Ten circuit while Kennedy has
also exhibited flashes of good form
in previous starts.
Fisher contemplates using the
same lineup which has come
through with 13 victories in 16
games so far this season with the
possible exception of third base-
man Mike Farnyk who may be
replaced by the up-and-coming
Keith Phelps.
Phelps impressed Fisher during
early practices with his fancy field-
ing but up until recently has not
shown sufficient power at the plate
to warrant a place on the starting
nine. However, constant tutelage in
his batting style has brought results
and he may get his chance today.
Advance notices earlier in the
season hailed Farnyk as potentially
one of Michigan's leading hitters, but
his stickwork has been disappoint-
ing. After last week's two-game ser-
ies with Notre Dame, his average fell
to .246 and at the beginning of the
week he was relegated to the sec-
cand string. He is also hampered by
a leg injury suffered in the second
Irish tilt.
Purdue comes to Ann Arbor
sporting a Conference record of
STANDINGS
W L Pet.
MICHIGAN ........,...6 0 1.0400
Northwestern ........,..8 2 .800
Illinois . . ........ . ......5 2 .714
Minnesota .......... ..5 3 .625
Purdue ................4 3 .571
Ohio State ...,........5 5 .500
Wisconsin .............4 5 .444
Iowa ..................3 4 .428
Indiana ...............2 8 .200
Chicago ...............0 10 .000
TODAY'S GAMES
Purdue at Michigan (2).

four wins against three losses, hav-
ing split two-game series with In-}
diana, Wisconsin, and Ohio State
and taken a single tilt from Illi- ' :
nois. The win from the Illini........................
marked the high point of the;
Boilermaker season as Illinois was .: " .
rated as one of the top teams in . .: .
the onference. ::k:
Precedent favor a piofs Wolver
o i................
we wistoday as the Boilermakers . ............
have not taken a contest from a TO WORKOUT FIRST-Bo Bowman, Michigan's southpaw hurler
Fisher-coached nine since 1938. Pur- with the enviable credit record, who has been named by coach Fisher
due has met Michigan 23 times on to pitch the first of today's contests against the Purdue Boilermakers,
the diamond and has emerged with while his equally invaluable team-mate Elroy Hirsch will get the nod
only five victories, for the second game of the day.
Byrd~eds Invitational Golf Touney

ON THE REBOUND
By JO ANN PETERSON
W OMEN, being to most men, alter-
nately pernicious thorns in the
side and "phantoms of delight," the
so-called "virile" male has for the
most part ejected the influence of
womon from the sports world, in a
conscientious attempt to keep one
field, at least, untrammeled by the
meddlesome fingers of females.
On the whole it isn't such a bad
idea. Women have a habit of ignor-
ing sports or worse still, simulating
ani interest which is based wholly on
a desire to attract the current man
of her choice. A hundred jokes a year
crop up about the sweet young thing
who asks when they are "going to
tackle that funny looking man with
the striped shirt on," or "why they
don't just push that little white ball
in the cup." Unfortunately probably'
most of these jokes are based upon
actual facts, and although at times
they are pushed to the poilt of mag-
nificent exaggeration, there is no
doubt that behind the story in ques-
tion there lurks the exasperation of
some male. baffled by the, thick-
headedness of women.
However, the masculine restrain-
ing influence has been a bit harsh;
it seems safe to say at this point that
the woman's capacity to grasp the
intricacies of a sports contest is as
.potential as that of the male. Unfor-
tunately, the female is too often
wrapped up in affairs which seem
pertinent to her at the time.
GIVEN a hand at sports though,
women have shown themselves
masters in this field as in many oth-
ers, and it is surprising that men, who
pride themselves on their fairness in
athletics, should be so near-sighted
as to fail to recognize the ability of
women in sports.
Even on this campus, where women
are for the most part more interested
in extracurricular activities that do
not pertain to the sports world, there
are outstanding woman performers
in almost all athletic activities. On
campus within the past few years
there have been women who have
been state champions in tennis, golf
and, ping-pong, and baseball teams
have been assembled capable of play-
ing errorless ball. What women want
is not a nose-dive into the sports
which are primarily male, but a rec-
ognition of their abilities in the
sports at which they have proven
their excellence.
Wynn Pitches 2-1 Win
PHILADELPHIA, June 9--(AP)--
Early Wynn pitched the Washington
Senators to a seven-hit 2 to 1 vic-
tory over the Philadelphia Athletics
tonight scoring the winning run him-
self.

PHILADELPHIA, June 9.- (/P)-
Sam Byrd of Detroit added a sub-par
67 today to his opening 66, stretching
his lead to three strokes with 133 at
the halfway mark in the $17,000 In-
quirer 72-hole invitational golf tour-s
nament at the Torresdale-Frankford
Country Club.
The former New York Yankee out-
fielder, putting like a wizard, used
only 28 strokes on the greens today,
compared with 29 yesterday when he
sizzled around in 66, five under par.
He sank putts ranging from "gim-
mes" to 30 feet today as he racked up

a half dozen birdies and missed par
twice.
Wood Paces Second Round
Craig Wood, the blond National
Open duration champion from Mam-
aroneck, N.Y., turned in the best
score of the second round, 66, ,to
steam into second place with 136,
three strokes off the pace with 36
holes to go.
- Another three strokes back was
Bud Lewis, Marine inductee from
Oreland, Pa., with 69-70-139, while
Harold (Jug) McSpaden of Philadel-
phia, with a pair of 70's, was next
with 140. Bob Hamilton of Evans-

Hume Twins Hope To
reak Own Mile Record

Martin,
Illinois

Barnard, Kraeger Also To Compete;
Favored To Capture Team Honors

vile, Ind., yesterday's second placer
with 68, skidded to 73 today to tie at
141 with Byron Nelson of Toledo, O.,
who started the tourney as a co-
favorite with McSpaden.
Nelson Goes One Under Par
Nelson ticked off a one-under-par
70 today, after losing two strokes
with a six on the 17th, where he
banged his second into Pouquessing
Creek, which wends its way across
eight different fairways. E.J. (Dutch)
Harrison of the Army and Little
Rock, Ark., was all alone at 142, after
a neat 69 today, while five players,
including amateurs Mal Galletta of
St. Albans, N.Y., and public linkster
Ed Furgol of Detroit, were knotted
by 143.
Wood, in carding 66, started with
a bogie five but followed up with six
birdies and a flock of pars to subtract
one stroke from the front nine par,
and four off the back stretch, with a
pair of 33's.
The 50 low-scoring professions, and
the ten low amateurs will battle it
out through 18-hole rounds Saturday
and Sunday, with the 21 low scorers
sharing in the prize list.

By HANK MANTHO
Michigan's famed dead heat twins,
Ross and Bob Hume, will don their
cinder togs for the performance
which will probably mark their last
intercollegiate appearance, e as they'
will pace a five-man contingent to-
day in the N. C. A. A. meet at Mil-
waukee. The twins will not only be
striving to gain national ranking,
but w ill also be trying to better their
own record time of 4:14.6 for the
mile, which was set in the Central
Collegiate meet at Great Lakes last
week.
Jack Martin, 220 yd. outdoor
Conference champion in the low
hurdles, George Kraeger in the
shot put and discus and Divk Bar-
nard in the half-mile, will com-
pose the remainder of the Wolver-
inc hopefuls.
Last Saturday's winning time found
the Humes crossing the finish line
with their arms interlocked, which
marked the eighth such tie that they
have run since the beginning of the
current track campaign. The main
competition for this mile chase came
from Jerry Thompson, 1943 N. C. A.
A.. two mile champion from Texas
University, who finally finished 20
yards behind the smooth-striding
duo.
The Michigan fliers' fast time of
4:14.6 shattered one of the oldest.
existing Michigan records which
has persisted for 16 years. They
erased one and eight-tenths sec-
onds from the previous mark, and
at the same time they were cred-
ited with running the fastest mile
ever run outdoors by a Wolverine
thinclad.
Though there will not be as many
teams competing in the National Col-
legiates as in previous years, the
field entered today may better the
1943 times in five events. Fred
Shefield, high jumper from Utah,
will be the only defending champion
on hand to compete in his specialty.
Don Burnham of Dartmouth won
the mile in last year's meet with the
time of 4:19.1, and inasmuch as the
Humes have already bettered this
time, they should win with compara-
tive ease.
Coach Ken Doherty of the Maize
and Blue stated earlier in the week
that with weather and track condi-
tions permitting, and perfect pac-
ing, his star distance men are capa-
ble of stepping up their half-mile
and third quarter time by four sec-
onds or more. If this is the case,
the Hume brothers may break their
own record again today, and it would
not surprise their mentor if their
final time hovered around 4:10.
*Southern California, which has
dominated the N. C. A. A. meet for
nine straight years, will not be
competing in this year's outing, so
Illinois, winner of the C. C. C. last
week and runnerup to Michigan in
the Big Ten finals, will be favorite
to cop the team title.

AMERICAN
W
St. Louis .......27
New York..... g .22
Detroit .........24
Chicago ........24
Boston .........23
Cleveland ......22
Washington ... .21
Philadelphia ... .20

If the Illini can successfully wrest
this crown from Southern California,
it will be the first time in 12 years
that this honor has rested in Big
Ten circles, where it got its start
when Illinois won the first N. C. A. A.
title in 1921.
Coach Leo Johnson of the Illini
will again be counting heavily on
Claude (Buddy) Young, star fresh-
man sprinter, to win the title. Inas-
much as the N. C. A. A. officials
award ten points for every first
place registered, Young may easily
chalk up forty points for his team.
He is expected to better the times
that Hal Davis of California set up
last year in the 100 and 220 yd.
dashes, and may well best the 23.8
in the lows set by Bill Cummins of
Rice.
MVa jor League Stand~ings

LEAGUE
L Pet.
21 .568
20 .524
23 .511
23 .511
23 .500
25 .468
24 .467
23 .465

GB
2
2%/
2%/2
3
4%~
4%/2
4%l

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Washington at Philadelphia, night.
Cleveland at St.hLouis, night.
Only games scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE

W
St. Louis......'29
Pittsburgh ......24
Cincinnati.....25
New York......22
Brooklyn.......21
Boston........21
Philadelphia .. .18
Chicago .,......14

L
15
17
19
23
24
27
24
25

Pet.
.659
.585
.568
.489
.467
.438
.429
.359

GB
3%1
4
7 %
81/%
10
10
12%2

Rain Prevents Tigers Meeting
Bluejackets in Exhibition Game

FRIDAY'S RESULTS
Boston at Brooklyn, night.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, night.
Only games scheduled.
_ _ _ __ _ _ . _ _ _ - - - _ _ _ _ .. _ _ w

Continuous
from 1 P.M.

COOL!

CHICAGO, June 9-(AP)-Thee
Detroit Tigers were prevented today
by rain from meeting Lt. Comm.
Mickey Cochrane's Great Lakes Blue-
jackets in an exhibition game at
the naval training center.
Tomorrow the Tigers will resume
their American league schedule by
facing the Chicago White Sox in a
single game. Paul Trout, seeking his
eighth victory, will oppose bespect-
acled Bill Dietrich on the mound.
Johnny Gorsica and Frank Over -
mire will pitch for Detroit in Sun-
day's double-header with the sox.
Manager Steve O'Neill said today
that Joe Hoover, who was hospital-

ized a: weekwith a stomach disorder,
would return to the shortstop post
arrived today when Leslie Floyd, 26-
year-old infielder with Texas league
and Pacific coast league experience,
joined the club. Detroit acquired
him from Portland of the coast
league.
The Tigers have lost four straight
games to the White Sox since Hal
Newhouser blanked them for 12 in-'
nings April 27. Chicago went tne
up in the series by winning 3' to 1
under the lights Wednesday.
The Tigers open a five game ser-
ies at Cleveland in a night game
with the Indians Monday.

Week Days 30c to 5 P.M.
- -- Last Times Today

CIASSIFIED ADVERTISING

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All other schedules completed.
OCTOBER
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SENIOR PICTURES
FOR TH E ENSIAN
MUST BE IN OFFICE
BY AUGUST 15th
The MICHI GANENSIAN
Student Publications Bldg.

BEAU NIGHT FOR KO'S:
Four Knockouts ive Flint Fans
TL1 Dk ~ J7 P~ kLdF

FLINT, Mich., June 9.-- (P)-
Knockouts in four bouts and a near
kayo in the windup fifth engagement
treated 1,173 fight fans to a novel.
experience at the IMA auditorium
here tonight.
After four preliminaries ended in
knockouts, Bobby Giles, Buffalo, N.Y.,

I

FUR STORAGE
21~/ East Libet St.

WI

. i n ht venin _..._
middleweight, came close to putting
Buster Peaks of Detroit down for the
count in the ten-round main event.
Peaks was on the verge of a knockout
in the ninth round.
Untilnthen it was close. Referee
Johnny Weber of Detroit scored four
rounds for Giles and two for Peaks.
A low blow cost Giles the fifth round.
Giles weighed 152, Peaks 157.
Preliminary results: Bill Eddy, 136,
Flint, knocked out Billy Sheldon.
136, Buffalo, (2); Benny McCombs,
151, Flint. knocked out Al Buzik, 155,
Buffalo (2) ; Bill Greer, 146, Detroit,
knocked out Joe Miller, 142, BuffaloI
(2) ; Martin Doyle, 157, Detroit,
knocked out John Stemple, 154, Flint
(3).
Buy War Bonds!

CLASSIFIED
RATES
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$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
three or more days. (In-
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additional five words.)
Contract Rates on Request
FOR RENT
GIRLS' ROOMS for summer term
and session at 715 Hill. Inquire
Virginia Dodd, Alpha Xi Delta, 825
Tappan, phone 25579.
ROOM and BOARD
FOLLOW the crowd to the Sig Ep
House, 733 South State. Room and
board available this summer. Con-
tact S. Linker, 6764.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING: thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claud Brown, 512 S. Main Street.

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Small black zipper pocket
case containing valuable papers.
Reward. Message Room1 Univer-
sity Hall.
WILL THE PERSON who claimed
the wrong fountain pen at Infor-
mation in University Hall after
Wednesday, please return it to
the nurse at Health Service.
LOST-Bicycle padlock and rubber
guard between W. A. B. and Chil-
dren's Institute. Reward. Rae
Larsen. 24547.
LOST-Phi Delta Theta pin. If found
call Jerry Cooley at 2-4551. Reward
in store.
FINALS ARE NEAR-Finder please
return brown spiral notebook for
Physics 72. Dee Armstrong 4089.
LOST-Saturday, Hill street, Baby
Hermes Swiss make typewriter.
Grey metal case. Please call 7574.
LOST: Benrus wrist watch at Union.
Call. John Sherk at 8266. Reward.
WRIST WATCH-Gold lady Elgin,
lost Sunday morning. E. Huron
St. Reward. Please phone 22901.
WANTED
WANTED: RIDE TO FLINT wanted
by Army pre-med student each
Saturday leaving about noon. Will
pay all expenses. Contact Box 6,
Michigan Daily.

ARS I

- Coming Sunday --
MARGARET O'BRIEN
"LOST ANGEL"

2~. * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ * ~ *1

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Even one dollar spent carelessly

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dollar saved would. help fight the
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BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS, TOO!
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