100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 28, 1944 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WAGE UIGHT

T HE MTCITGALN DYALY

SUNDAY, MAY 28, 191

GUILD PROGRAMS:
Dr. Blakeman To Speak at
Wesleyan Foundation Today

Among the guild programs for the
weekend will be a talk by Dr. Ed-
ward W. Blakeman, University coun-
selor, at the Wesleyan Foundation
meeting at 4 p. m. today.
Dr. Blakeman's topic will be "The
Christian in the Post-War World.
The group will meet at the Metho-
dist Church and then go together to
the Meadows estate.
Rev. Leonard Verduin of the Stu-
dent Evangelical Chapel will speak
to members of the Westminster
Guild at 5 p. m. on "Historical Ori-
gins of Religious Toleration."
Events at the recent Northern
Baptist cpnference will be discussed
by Rev. C. H. Loucks at the 5 p. m,
meeting of the Roger Williams group
at the Guild house.
Congregational - Disciples Guild
wil install their new officers at spe-
cial services at 5 p. m. today. Clara
M. DeBoer wil conduct the program.
Supper and the usual social hour
will also be held.
Prof. William Willcox of the his-
tory department will speak on "The
Beginning of the Anglican Church"
at 6 p.m. today at the Canterbury
Club meeting at the St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church.
Members of the Lutheran Student
Association will leave after church
services today at the Zion Parish
Hall'for an all-day Ashram meeting
at Saginaw Forest. The topic will

be "A Pattern of Living for Students"
with several discussions following
that theme. Dinner and supper will
be served and the group will return
in the late evening.
Outdoor recreation will be avail-
able from 4 p. m. on at the Univer-
sity Lutheran Student Center with
Gamma Delta holding their supper
meeting at 5:30 p. m.
Edmon son To
At.tendCouncil
Dean J. B. Edmonson of the
School of Education will leave today
for a two day conference in Mon-
treal of educators from Canada and
the United States.
Plans will be considered for in-
creasing the attention to studies of
the United States in Canadian
schools as well as increasing the use
of Canadian history and geography
in schools in this country. The con-
ference is sponsored by the American
Council on Education and is fin-
anced by the Carnegie Foundation.
Dean Edmonson will attend at a
member of the Executive Committee
of the Council.

CHALLENGES WLB-Chceter J. Adamczyk, president of local 176,
Gas Coke and Chemical Workers of America (CIO) in Detroit, whose
members are striking at the Parke, Davis and Co., challenged the Na-
tional War Labor Board to interfere. In a wire sent to Chairman
William H. Davis, he denied the WLB's jurisdiction over negotiations.
Adamczyk is seen pointing to a group of union signs.
STUDENT COUNSELORS:
TU Fresh Air Camp To Offer
Opportunity for Child Study
< A _ ___ _ _ - _

iNV EST I N VICTORY
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

_-

i

Church Groups
Elect Officers
Four student chuch grou.ps have
recently held elections for their of-
ficers who will preside for the com-
ing year.
The Wesleyan Foundation will
have Dorr Burns as president, Char-
lotte Muir as vice-president, Della
Morgan as secretary and Don Cosner
as treasurer.
Heading the list at the Congrega-
tional-Disciples is Harold Osgood'
A/S, as president, Priscilla Hodges
as vice-president, Shirley Marceilus
as secretary-treasurer and Walter
Scott, A/S, program chairman. Wor-
ship chairman will be Bernice
Grimes; publicity, Jane Thomas;
projects chairman, Edith DeBlois;
social chairman, Dawn Saari and
publications, Dorothy Potts.
Lutheran Student Association will
have Susan Thorsch as president,
Louise Powell as vice-president, Ruth
Nordquist as secretary and Frank
Rizzardi as treasurer.
Roger Williams Guild at the First
Baptist Church, at their annual
banquet yesterday, installed Ernest
Van Valkenburg as president, Shir-
ley Hastings as vice-president, Doro-
thy Jenkins as secretary and Doug-
ley Orvis, A/S, as treasurer.
Mrs. Frazier Given Award
Mrs. Irene J. Frazier of 908 Huron
St. has been awarded the University
scholarship in the School of Bus-
iess Administration, it was an-
nounced yesterday.
CLASSIFIEDI
DIRECTORY
HELP WANTED
PART OR full-time help any day of
week including Sunday.iCampus
Bike Shop, 510 East Williams.
FOR SALE
SMALL used portable typewriter. For
information call 24143.
MISCELLANEOUS
HIGHEST CASH PRICE paid for
your discarded wearing apparel.
Claud Brown, 512 $. Main Street.
MIMEOGRAPHING: thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
WANTED TO RENT
MUSIC student wishes to park at-
tractive house trailer adjacent
home with available toilet facilities.
Location within two miles campus.
Rent or lease. References furnish-
ed. Box 17, Michigan Daily.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST -- Alpha Omicron Pi sorority
pin. Please return to owner, Pat
Swanson. Reward! Phone 2-2281.
BLACK change purse in front of 726
Oakland. Reward. Call 21513.
ONE BLUE looseleaf notebook, per-
sonal importance. Reward. Please
return to Barbara Alig, Martha
Cook Bldg.
LOST-Slide-rule Monday afternooni
in 206 Mason Hall. Contact Box
13, Michigan Daily. Reward.
LOST -- Crawford watch, Michigan
Union, Tuesday. High personal
value. Reward. Howard Cole,
21642.

Month-End Clearance

Any cries of "author" after the
opening performance Thursday night
of Co. D's musical, "Rumor Has It,"
will be answered by a trio of uni-
formed scriptwriters - Pfc's Oscar
Shefler, Daniel Gilman and Stanley
Krenitz who composed the book for
the show.
All three of the authors have a
background of work in campus pro-
ductions. Pfc. Shefler, who received
his A.B. degree from the University
of Pittsburgh in.1941, was assistant
editor of the Pittsburgh News and
was on the staffs of the school hu-
mor magazine and yearbook.
In 1941 he wrote the script for a
prize-winning campus musical. One
of his skits, "Two on a Rather Over-
Complicated Raft", was awarded
first prize in a contest conducted by

Trio of Privates Wrote Script
For Musical, Rumor Has It'

the National Theatre Conference.
His fellow author, Pfc. Daniel Gil-
man, attended William and Mary
College and New York University.
He was a prindipal scriptwriter for
the NYU Follies, annual campus pro-
duction, and contributed to Medley,
the NYU humor magazine. He was
also on the staff of the NYU Heights
Daily News.
Pfc. Stanley Krenitz was a student
at Ohio State University and was a
member of the staff of the Ohio
State Lantern and of the Ohio State
humor magazine. He contributed
the scripts for several campus stu-
dent productions.
Tickets for both the June 1 and
the June 2 performances go on sale
tomorrow morning at the Lydia
Mendelssohn box office.

DICKIES

1.19

. . .

W
for health,9
for beauty!
You'll find that figure glori-
fying swim suit you need
right here. We also have a
complete stock of Catalina
swim suits for men and wo-
men !

.,, ,, /
'"E .
'
. . . '

:,
'h
M S\
w.
' ti':

An opportunity to study and treat
problems of childhood and earlyrad-
olescence will be offered to about 40
students this summer at the Univer-
sity Fresh Air Camp for Boys on
Patterson Lake.
In conjunction with the camp the
Summer Session is planning a work-
shop in adjustment of problems for
former counselors, graduates and
undergraduates, men and women.
The period will be from June 26 to
Aug. 26.
Counselors WillBe Students
These student counselors will at-
tend classes during the early part
of the session rnd will then act as
counselors during the latter part.
Each one will be in charge of six to
eight boys iri a cabin group and will
be responsible for their program as
well as daily observational reports.
Both the counseloring and worship
activities will be tied together closely.
Some "main areas of interest" from
which the student counselor may
choose special studies are guidance
programs, leadership, menital hy-
giene, interview techniques and study
and diagnosis of behavior problems.
Attention will also be given to the
cause and prevention of juvenile
delinquency, interpretation, observa-
tional data, social psychology and
sociology.
Work To B Le Guided
This work will be done under the
guidance of two resource leaders, a
workshop coordinator and other
members from the faculty when
necessary.
A maximum of six hours of credit
may be earned in the workshop by
election of education courses C120 or
C220 and sociology 200 or 201. Re-
quirements include reports on as-
signed reading, preparation of case
studies, group conferences and a
term report.
uth State In addition to room and board for
' the camp session, a scholarship equal
to the summer session tuition, will be

MOE -or t ht

given as compensation for the stu-
dent counseloring services.
Committee Members Listed
Under the chairmanship of Prof.
F. N. Menefee of the engineering col-
lege, the faculty committee has about
completed plans for this year's pro-
gram. Other members are Dr. Edward
W. Blakeman, Prof. L. J. Carr, Ken-
neth Doherty, Dr. Warren Forsythe,
Dr. G. A. May, Prof. Howard Mc-
Clusky, Clark Tibbitts, Dr. H. A.
Towsley, H. P. Wagner and Prof.
Leigh Young.
The camp's purpose is to bring to-
gether teachers and social service
workers from agencies of Detroit and
surrounding cities. The boys are
analyzed to find the sources of habit-
ual or occasional trends in their
behavior.
Recommendations Planned
"This daily contact with the boys
can furnish the basis for recom-
mendations to teachers, parents and
recreational leaders," Dr. Blakeman
said. "Camp experience and new
associates can break undesirable city
habits and thus get the boys off to
a better start in the fall."
Additional information and appli-
cation blanks may be obtained from
Robert Rosema, resident director, at
Lane Hall.
Iuthierani To Hold
Conifirmiation Rites
Confirmation service, read by Rev.
Henry O. Yoder, will be held today
at the Trinity Lutheran Church.
This will be the third service this
month that has received new mem-
bers. Those included at this time
are James Godfrey, Joyce Hakala,
Joyce Hetchler, Barbara Layher and
Jean Ann Shewman.
Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church
will confirm 26 new members at the
10:30 a.m. service today. Rev. E. C.
Stellhorn's sermon will be "The
Growing Temple."
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
day, in the Union. Presence of mem-
bers is compulsory.
The Phi Kappa Phi initiation of
new members will be held in the
Rackham Amphitheatre at 8 o'clock.
Tuesday, June 6. The initiation will
be followed by a reception in the
Assembly Hall. All members are in-
vited to attend.
Varsity Mens Glee Club: The final
meeting of the year will be held at
7:15, Thursday, June 1, in the Glee
Club at the Union. The keys have
arrived and will be distributed. A
big supply of refreshments will be
on hand; and all former members
on campus are urged to attend. Let's
all make this last get-together a
good one,
Ann Arbor Library Club: Fourth
meeting, 1943-44, Friday, June 2, at
7:45 P. M. at the William L. Clements
Library. Talk on Manuscripts by
Mr. Howard H. Peckham. Election
of officers. Refreshments.
f -Il

AN KLETS
Grouped to 95c, now

29c, 59c, 79c

Sport and dress-the dickies season
COM PACTS
All-metal pastels of French enamel,
formerly 1.95. now . .
Plastics and woods, up to 3.00, now

J EWELRY
Costume pieces up to 2.50, now
BLOUSES and SKIRTS
'Blouses at 4.95 and 5.95, now
Skirts from 5.95 to 12.95, now

. 59c

2.50 and 3.00
20% off

Combed Cotton SWEAT SH I RTS
d '-S IR' S . . . . . . . 1.50

.
«.1 "

' C NAB
- 1..

v40

"pap

1.00
1.79

SAGINAW
*ANN ARBOR
* J A C K S O N
" BATTLE CREEK
" L A N SING6

711 North University

907 Sou

DIAL 9317 " 1108 SO UTH UNIVERSITY

4 THE MICHIGAN DAILY SERVICE EDITION

*

I

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

sUNDAY, MAY 28, 1944

COLD

haps students buy other
books.
- * * * .
OLDEST ALUMNUS of
the University, Artemas
Roberts, died March 7 at
the age of 102 years, six
months and ten days. He
received his Bachelor of
Science degree in 1867,
learned to drive - at the
age of 73 and up to the
last few years of his life
took part in his favorite
p a s t i m e, shuffleboard.
Now the oldest alumnus
is John Wesley Dill, 101,
who graduated in 1879
with a Doctor of Medicine
Degree.
* * *
WATERMAN GYM was
transformed into a park,
complete with rustic
benches last night for
"Boulevard Ball," given by
Parnhellenic and Assembly
organizations. Many a date
was repaid, for the men
were the guests. Music was
provided by Jerry Wald and
his orchestra, who came
directly from a New York,
engagement. An inter-
mission entertainment was
provided by Doc Fielding

Ann Arbor. In connection
with Gov. Kelly's proclam-
ation to that effect, the
Michigan Office of Civilian
Defense, with the coopera-
tion of the University,
churches and city officials,
has devised a plan for sim-
ultaneous state-wide ob-
servance of D-Day. Here
in Ann Arbor air raid si-
rens, the University whistle,
the Carillon Tower and
church bells will be used
to announce the invasion,
after official reports have
been received by. the City
Police. At that time the
signals will be used for a
period of 90 seconds. This
is to be followed by a ces-
sation of all activities for a
period of one minute, which
is to be given over to silent
prayer and reflection upon
the solemn significance of
the occasion.
* * *
ITALIAN CO - BELLIG-
ERENTS attached to the
JAG School in the Law
Quad told Daily reporters
last week that they want
the conclusion of the war
as soon as possible and
they want to go home. The

their homes and families
in Italy,
* * *
THE VETERAN'S SERV -
ICE BUREAU to help with
the educational problems
of returning veterans has
been set up by the Uni-
versity, it was announced
last week. It will act as an
information and co-ordin-
ating office, working with
other state and federal
agencies, to see that war
veterans, both men and wo-
men, who plan to come to
the University of Michigan
may have the best possible
educational advantages
here. Headquarters of the
bureau are in Rm. 1510 of
the Rackham Building.
* * *
36 ASTP students here
got a break last week. For
it was announced that
graduating senior dental
students in the Army Spe-
cialized Training Program
here will receive discharges
at the close of this semes-
ter and will be released for
civilian or institutional
service. Dentistry is listed
as a critical occupation by
the War Manpower Com-'

FU R

STO RAG E

in Ann Arbor's Only
and Michigan's Best
Cold Fur Storage Vaul ts
LOOPS AND BUT TONS RE P LACED-
MINOR RIPS SEWN - GLAZI NG -

including
year 'round, all risk
insura~nce.

$

.0

ILVI

N
, i -

NOTICE!

III

C'E' T.T f1T W'Ul_[f£~~nr on

II

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan