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April 13, 1944 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1944-04-13

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 13, 1944

A
i
J

Dewey,_Roosevelt
Dr. Ockenga MacArthur,
Will Speak on Stassen GainI
Protestantism Majority Vote,
Cn-re- ational Pastnr 0

Still

Lead

in Presiden

tial Nomination
Graduate School Gives Additional
Scholarship Awards to Students

To Give SRA Lecture
Tuesday at Rackham
Dr. Harold John Ockenga, lecturer
on social philosophy and president
of the National Association of Evan-
gelicals, will be the first speaker of
the SRA spring lecture series when
he presents a talk on "The Nature of
Protestant Orthodoxy" at 8:15 p.m.
Tuesday in the Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Dr. Ockenga, who has studied at
Princeton Theological Seminary, re-
ceived his A.B. degree from Taylor
University, his Th.B. from Westmins-
ter Seminary, and his A.M. and Ph.D.
degrees from the University of Pitts-
burgh.
Dr. Ockenga has travelled extens-
ively in Europe, the Near East, Arabia
and North Africa. Recognized as a
Bible conference speaker, he is at
present the pastor of the historic
Park Street Congregational Church
in Boston.
In 1937 .he received an honorary
degree of Doctor of #Divinity from
Taylor University, and in 1939 he
was ionored with the Doctor of Let-
tersdegree by the Suffolk Law School
of Boston.
He is author of "These Religious
Affections," and "Our Protestant
Heritage."
Prof. Soute To
Speak on Latin
Amcerican Trip'
Prof. Malcolm Soule of the depart-
ment of bacteriology will speak on his
recent trip to Latin America at 7:30
p.m. Sunday at the International
Center.
Prof. Soule recently spent two
months in Latin American countries
making. a survey of medical condi-.
tions there. His trip was under the
sponsorship of the Office of the Co-
ordinator of Inter-American Affairs.
Besides making the study of medi-
cal conditions, he interviewed many'
Latin American students and select-
ed a number of them to study in the
United States. Their special field for
study here will be leprosy.
Though he paid particular atten-
tion to the needs of Paraguay, Boliv-
ia and Ecuador, he also visited Bra-
zil, Argentina, Chile, Peru and Col-
ombia.
The lecture will be illustrated with
color slides which Prof. Soule took
during the trip. It will be followed by
the usual snack hour.
Alpha Chi Sigma
To Meet Saturday
Alpha Chi Sigma, national chemi-
cal society, will hold a special meet-
ing of all members at 1 p.m. Satur-
day in Rm. 309, Chemistry Building,
for the reception of R. M. Warren,
district consular for the fraternity.
A party is being planned for 10
a.m. Saturday at the residence of
Paul Norris. All members are invit-
ed.

Farley Endorses Fourth
Term Policy of FDR
by D. HAROLD OLIVER
Associated Press Correspondent
While Lieut. Commander Harold
E. Stassen and General Douglas Mac-
Arthur rolled up popular majorities
midwest advisory primaries, Gov.
Thomas E. Dewey and President
Roosevelt retained yesterday their
imposing leads in convention dele-
gate strength for the presidential
nominations.
Farley Chosen N.Y. Chairman
The President picked up most of
another 10 delegates selected in New
York and received a "compromise"I
fourth term endorsement from his
home state's party committee which
unanimously reelected James A. Far-
ley as state chairman.
Here's the way the Republican del-
egate line-up stood today subject to
further tabulating in Nebraska:
Total convention votes.....1,059
Needed to nominate........530
Total selected...............355t
Pledged to Dewey: Missouri 6, New
Hampshire 2, Oklahoma 2, Wisconsin
15-total 25. Claimed for him: Mis-
souri 7, New York 92, North Carolina,
a minimum of 20, Oklahoma , Wis-
consin2-total 123. Grand total 148.
Stassen Has 33 Pledges
Pledged to Stassen: Minnesota 23,
Nebraska 6, Wisconsin 4-total 33.
None claimed so far.
Pledged to MacArthur: Wisconsin
3. None claimed.
Uninstructed and unclaimed: Flo-
rida 15, Illinois 50, Iowa 23, Kansas{
19, Louisiana 13, Minnesota 2, Mis-
souri 17, Nebraska 9 (awaiting final
primary count), New Hampshire 9,
New Mexico 8, New York 1, North
Carolina 5-total 172.
The Democratic delegate line-up:
Total convention votes......1,176
Needed to nominate..........589
Total selected................236
Pledged to President Roosevelt:
Maine 10, New Hampshire 10, Wis-
consin 26-total 46. Claimed for him:
Illinois 50, Nebraska 12, New York
95-total 157. Grand total 203.
Uninstructed and unclaimed: Ari-
zona 10, Louisiana 22, New York 1-
total 33.
Republican conventions in Connec-
ticut and Maine today will select an-
other 16 and 13 delegates, respective-
ly. Wendell L. Willkie had potential
support in both groups before he
withdrew. They are expected to be
uninstructed.
Army Discharges
47,261 State Men
LANSING, April 12.- ()- The
armed forces discharged 1,160 Michi-
gan men during March, bringing the
number of discharges in this state
since Pearl Harbor to 47,261, State
Selective Service Headquarters said
today.
The reports said the March re-
leases compare with a total of 1,099
in January and 1,221 in February.
Of the March total, 1,027 were from
the Army and 133 from the Navy.
Disability discharges amounted to
765, few of them from combat.
Of the total, 576 were from Wayne
County, 10 from Houghton County,
50 from Kent and 12 from Muskegon
County.

SAKHALIN KAMCHATKA ATT U N
Japanese AiranQe PARAMUSIiIRO:'rI + Harbor
Present
U. S. Air Control KARAFUTO:KUR L
MONOladivostokHOKKADO(
K OAPacific Ocean
CHINA=Tokyo
k- Shanghai. KYUSHU
- MIDWAY
- - HAWAIIAN
- ong > FORMOSA -.MARCUS1,,
AHAINANgPearl
ARIANAS :Harbor
THAILAND ECHINAJOHNSTON
GM ENWETOK MARSHALL 0
TRUK - IS.
"*T
ALAYA - GIBERT ALMYRA .
SUMATRA .Sngapore ADRAY TARAWA IS- ..
- - - '---R-~ ..ADMIRALTY_-*- ----------- -----------~.. ~ H E; QAO
BORNEO ~ ~~~ ~s~ 515~~~ ~ o~
Rabs
AVA C'NEWEE- SOLOMON ELlICE'
'tu y CELI.GUNEA .5 .. S.IS. If
- ' IS
INSGUADALCAAL
SI & 5 A~ceA1000
~ ° ssm !A USTRALIA STATUTE MILES
. f SRALIA . 4. ' AT EQUATOR

BLACK LINE AND PLANE SYMBOLS-outline areas of control by American Air Forces in the Pacific
as defined on an official U.S. Naty map which was exhibited at a Washington news conference by Sec-
retary Knox. Broken line represents limit of effective Japanese air control at height of Jap offensives,
as defined on a similar official map. Arrows indicate major U.S. offensives which have shoved the Jap-
anese back-the Aleutians campaign, the invasion of the Marshalls and Gilberts, the Solomons drive,
and the offensive in the New Guinea area.

Emma Lou Thornbrough, who is
now working for her Ph.D., has been
awarded the May Preston Slosson
Fellowship for 1944-45, it was an-
nounced recently by Dean Clarence
S. Yoakum of the Graduate School
and Mrs. Edson Sunderland, chair-
man of the Fellowship Committee of
the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti Branch of
the American Association of Univer-
sity Women.
The fellowship is offered by the
association in honor of the late
Dr. May Preston Slosson, mother
of Prof. Preston Slosson of the his-
tory department. Miss Thorn-
brough has also been appointed to
a University Fellowship in the
Graduate School.
A University Fellowship was also
granted to Enno Deward Kroehe,
A.B., history.
State College Scholarships were
given to Mary E. Neuroth, Adrian
College, speech; Elsie M. Ferenty,
Albion College, English; Ann E. Ful-
lerton, Alma College, botany; Geral-
dine Fikse, Calvin College, history;
Kathryn I. Wirth, Central Michigan
College of Education, political sci-
ence; Victor P. Ireiter, Hillsdale Col-
lege, chemistry; Marjorie Jane Em-
ery, Hope College, history; Carolyn
Kinney, Kalamazoo College, psychol-
ogy; Dorothy J. Rahm, Michigan
State Normal College, education;
Hohn. H. Sazynski, University of De-
troit, mechanical engineering; Arlene
H. Aldrich, Wayne University, edu-
cation, and June M. Cladwell, West-
arn Michigan College of Education,
history.
Those who received University
scholarships offering tuition for
three terms are: Jeanette Albert,
economics; Phyllis A. Bate, history;
Margaret E. Booker, social work*
Bernadine A. Bujila, B.A., M.A.,
B.Ed., Romance languages; Hulius
P. Capua, history; Ruth A. Cohn,
B.S., physics; Mary E. Crockett,
biological chemistry; Jane S. Cro-
nin, B.S., mathematics; Amy L.
Downey, Romance languages; Tru-
dy B. Enzer, chemistry, and Jane
Gaggen, physics.
The list continues with Norman K.
Flint, geology; Barbara B. Golder-
Piano Recital Planned
Virginia Lowery, Grad. SM, will
present a piano recital in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for the
degree of Master of .Music at 8:30
p.m. Tuesday in the Assembly Hall of
the Rackham Building.

berg, Romance languages; Maxine
M. Guin, B.A., M.A., English; Alan
H. Halpin, mathematics; Charlotte
L. Harriman, biological chemistry;
Mary C. Herald, speech; Meta T. Hill,
Latin; Barry H. Hensen, educatidn;
Rebecca A. Johnson, speech, Esther
Kaufman, English; Nellie H. Kellogg,
A.B., English; Annette Klein, eco-
nomics, Riki Kobayashi, B.S., Ch.E.,
chemical engineering; Jean G. Lang-
ton, fine arts, and Irving H. Massey,
English.
Others receiving University schol-
arships are James Y. Nakamure,
chemistry; Irene D. Neu, history;
Dave M. Okada, sociology; Rose E.
Packer, A.B., sociology; Preston Parr,
Jr., B.S. in Ch.E., chemical engineer-
ing; Ina Lu Petschek, history; Peg-
gylee Purcell, psychology; Margaret
Pyle, music; Violet B. Siegler, geol-
ogy; Hane H. Snure, education; Eliz-
abeth B. Story, English, and Theo-
dore J. Wysocki, mathematics.
Mlichigan
Playing through Saturday
Guys Who ..re
Gallant... and Game!
John WAYNE-Icnni O'KEEE
Susan HAYWARD
Also
CARTOON - NEWS
Coming Next SUNtbAY!
T

A

CHANGED LIFE:
Morgan Predicts New World
fil Aircraft Indutstr y After War,

"We in the aircraft industry fore-
see a world so changed that it will
seem almost a new kind of life after
the war," Mr. Geoffrey F. Morgan,
manage,, of the Speakers Bureau of
the Douglas Aircraft Company, Inc.,
said in a lecture yesterday.
"Tomorrow's maps will show the
equator as the circumference of a
great circle which has the North Pole
as its center point, and the great
Dice To Discuss
Heredi in Talk
Dr. Lee R. Dice of the Heredity
Clinic, will discuss "Problems of Hu-
man Heredity" in an informal talk
before Phi Sigma, scientific society,
at 8 p.m. today in the Rackham Am-
phitheatre.
He will also point out the problems
of the heredity research and the out-
line used in this work, supported by
the Rackham Board. In addition to
the formal presentation of the ma-
terial, slides will be shown illustrat-
ing some of the pedigrees of human
heredity.
The public, particularly those in-
terested in the practical difficulties
accompanying the study of the the-
ories of heredity, is invited td attend.

trade routes of the world, while they
will not lie directly across the pole,
will lie so near as to come well within
the Arctic Circle," Mr. Morgan con-
tinued.
He explained that a large propor-
tion of the traffic will be "up over the
top of the world" with stations at
either Greenland or Iceland, and air
routes fanning out to Moscow, Bom-
bay, Calcutta and Hongkong.
"Before 1950, the Office of War In-
formation believes that the United
States may well have 500,000 private,
commercial and military planes in
active service," Mr. Morgan stated.
"The extent to which airplanes will
be used by private owners is a debat-
able point."

Kelly Seeks
McKay Defeat
Governor Heads Board
ToP revent Re-election
LANSING, April 12.--(P)-Govern-
or Kelly today took active command
of Republican forces seeking the de-
feat of Frank D. McKay of Grand
Rapids for re-election as Republican
National Committeeman for Michi-
gan.
In effect his stand was a dramatic
reply to the contention of Henry D.
Sheldon of Detroit, chairman of the
Anti-McKay Republican precinct or-
ganization, that Kelly had covertly
thrown his support to McKay and
was responsible for the precinct or-
ganization's defeat at the recent
Wayne County Republican Conven-
tion.
The developments were marked by

a
1

clear indication that the steering
Tate Receives Alpha committee feared it may have been
, over-optimistic in some of its claims
Chii Sigma Award . of strength, and that it needed more
than the formal endorsement of its
Raymond E. Tate, '44E, will be cause it had received from Kelly pri-
presented the annual scholarship or to the county conventions last
award of a year's membership to the March 20.
American Chemical Society by Alpha Traditionally, the governor is al-
Chi Sigma, national chemical fra- lowed to determine who shall be del-
ternity. egates-at-large, and if Wagner 's
The fraternity presents the award judgment is correct, Kelly would have
each spring to the senior chem t power to force McKay ut of of-
eac sprngtoth snirheistry fice.

or chemical engineering student who
has the highest scholastic rating for
his four years at the University. Tate
has had a 3.9 average.

C

-... A

h 1

I

CLASSIFIED

jUNI
Communications men on
every front are "getting the
message through," stringing
wires, repairing breaks, keep-
ing the circuits working. They
even use captured enemy
wires and pole lines.

CIN

TAY FESTIVAL
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, May 4, 5,16, 7

t DIRECTORY

11

Official issuing Agency Here - Bonds Issued, Day or Night
Shows Continuous from 1 P.M.
JNA'A S'S F/VF7 THA

PERFORMERS

PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS
BIDU SAYAO, Metropolitan Opera . . . . Soprano
ROSE BAMPTON, Metropolitan Opera . . . Soprano
THELMA VON EISENHAUER,
Chicago Civic Opera . . . . . . Soprano
KERSTIN THORBORG, Metropolitan Opera . Contralto
CHARLES KULLMAN, Metropolitan Opera . . Tenor
JOHN'.BROWNLEE, Metropolitan Opera . . Baritone
SALVATORE BACCALONI, Metropolitan Opera . Bass
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Russian Virtuoso . . . Violinist
GREGOR PIATIGORSKY; World Renowned
Performer . . . . . . . . . Violoncellist

U
'CLASSIFIED
RATES
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of .10c for each
additional 5 words,)
Non-Contract
$1.00 perr15-word nsertion for
three or more days. (In-
crease of 25c for each
additional 5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
FOR SALE
ELECTRIC sIRONS FOR SALE -
Good ones, used, reconditioned.
While they last, $3.00 up. 713 S.
Division Street

Maintaining dependable
communications at home is
the Bell System's wartime job.
And Bell Telephone Labora-
tories'scientists, on war assign-
ment now, will one day turn
again to peacetimework-mak.
ing this country's telephone
service the best in the world.

F-

it

GENIA
PIERRE

NEMENOFF
LUBOSHUTZ

I

EUGENE ORMANDY
SAUL CASTON .
HARL McDONALD .
HARDIN VAN DEURSEN
MARGUERITE HOOD .

Two-Piano Team
Orchestra Conductor
Associate Orchcstra Conductor
. Guest Orchestra Conductor
. . . . Choral Conductor
. Youth Chorus Conductor

HIGH SPOTS
Symphonies: Mahler, "Dos Lied Von der Erde"; Brahms, No.
4; Beethoven, No. 7; Mozart, No. 35; Tchaikovsky, No. 6.
Concertos: Brahms Concerto for violin and Violoncello;
McDonald Concerto for Two Pianos.

MISCELLANEOUS

MIMEOGRAPHING: thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 08S .,
State.
REVLON-lipsticks and wind-milled
face powder, nail enamels and ac-
cessories at Marshalls, next to the{
State Theatre.
HELP WANTED
STUDENT-Men and women. Good
pay. Excellent meals. University
Grill. 615 East Williams. Phone
9268.
YOUNG LADY to assist in office
several hours daily. General office

.
r

Marine corp Photo.

r

SO Tr Y CIA V t i W______ t

anamma

smaa.s

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