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March 26, 1944 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-03-26

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THE MICHI4AN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 6, IS4y

Burma Batile Continues withSti Fightin RESEARcH AGAINST

WASTE:

I'

JYin Fomes
arauders Cut J p
Southward Retreat
By Thv Associated Press
NEW DELHIL, March 25.-The bat-
tle for North Burma grew hourly
-more intensive today as American
and Chinese forces which captured
Shaduzup bit again into the east
flank of Japanese forces now cut off
in the Mogaung valley. Touch-and-
go fighting continued in the main
Japanese offensive across the border
to.ard Imphal, India, where in the
first tank clash the Japanese lost five
machines.
Vanks Take Shaduzup
'Merrill's Marauders won Shaduzup
and continued their attack as the
steam-roller Chinese 38th Division
rolled steadily into the Mogaung val-
ley. The next objective of both of
athese forces was probably Kamaign.
The prospects of a major battle in
the Myitkyina area appeared certain.
Although the Japanese penetration
;was reg'arded with considerable re-
'spect, there was a manifest feeling

_.. _ _____._.. .... _.. . r.. i a r.r p 's

that it will eventually be shown that
the Japanese committed themselves
too deeply. Both the Japanese and
the British are using tanks.
Brig. Gen. Frank Merrill's All-Am-
erican Marauders, together with units
of the Chinese 38th Division, -took
Slaaduzup, 45 miles northwest of Mo-
gaung on the 'Myitkyina-Mandalay
railway, by a swift "end run" maneu-
ver which cut around the Japanese
east flank.
Hand-Ato-and Fighting
These forces expected to trap an
undetermined number of Japanese
being pressed down the Mogaung
valley in artillery duels and hand-to-
hand fighting by the main Chinese
force from Janibu Bum, the dividing
line between the Hukawng and Mo-
gaung valleys.
Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten's
communique announced'engagements
in progress on both sides of the Tams-
Imphal road, with'the Japanese mak-
ing some progress southeast of Im-
phal where the closest patrols pre-
viously were reported 38 miles from
that British -base -for operations in
Burma. Allied resistance was increas-
ing.
Stiff Fighting Reported
Stiff fighting was reported on the
northeastern approach where some
Japanese units made further progress
in the Sombra Hill tracts near Ukh-
rul while one was forcedto withdraw.

if .- ~

Service Men-7ewd /
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by rubber stamping them with black or white
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REDS BREAK THROUGH-Upper arrow indicates where the First
Ukrainian arnvI has smashed open the enemy lines on a 37-mile front
breaking into an area on the road to Wa'rsaw. Other arrows indicate
an encircling maneuver at Proskurov, the cafture of Nadushita and the
clearing of the east side of the Bug River.
ADULT EDUCATOR:
Danish Bishop's Works To Be
Discussed at Methodist Chureh

Hull Congress
Truce Breaks
Secretary Complains of
Press Reports of Talk
WASHINGTON, March 25.-A
heated complaint from Secretary
Hull that "garbled and inaccurate"
accounts were released of his talk
with 24 Republican Congressmen
capped today the backfire of what
started as a gesture on both sides to-
ward closer understanding on foreign.
policy.
Most of the legislators came away
from their conference with the Sec-
retary of State yesterday dissatisfied.
with the results, although reaction
varied. Their chief complaint was
that he did not tell them in definite
terms some of the things they want-
ed to know.
What they told reporters Hull did
say in the supposedly confidential
conference so annoyed the Secretary,
however, that he authorized this di-
rect quotation:
"As is usual when a few people get
to talking about an off-the-record
discussion, second hand accounts are
garbled and inaccurate in important
respects, as in this case."
Rep. O'Konski, (Rep., Wis,), one
of those who participated in yester-
day's conference, said. the news stor-
ies he saw were "very specific and ac-
curate. Actually the Secretary told
us very little."
The State Department would not
say which points in the reports dif-
fered from what Hull actually said.
The congressmen, who spent two
and one-half hours with Hull, said
they had been told that Britain and
Russia were at odds over the Polish
border, and that both countries' for-
eign ministers refused at the Moscow
Conference to discuss Hull's plans
for a defeated Germany.
RONAG Sees New
Destroyer Launched
Forty-two officers from the Re-
serve Officers Naval Architecture
Group went to Bay City yesterday to
watch the launching. of a new de-
stroyer escort.
The boat was built by the DeFoe
shipbuilding works at Bay City. Lt.-
Com. George A. Andrews, Lt. C. A.
Hoyt and Lt. J. M. Ammerman ac-
companied the students.

Doing research work on the by-
products of the sugar beet industries
in order to find more carbohydrates
and vitamin supplements to be used
in vital war industries, are Dr. Milo
Mickelson of the bacteriology depart-
ment and Dexter Rogers, senior
chemistry student.
"Our hope is that we will find new
uses for the waste materials of the
sugar beet industry," Dr. Mickelson
remarked, "for if these materials
could be recovered, they might be as
important to that industry as the
corn steep liquor by-product is to the
corn industries. We are trying to
find out the amount of vitamins and
waste products in the beet sugar."
Hand Labor Costly
"One of the problems of raising
beet sugar is the cost of hand labor
involved in thinning out the plants,
for the best seed is compound and as
many as six plants may spring from
one seed," he commented.
"However, a new process has re-
cently been developed by which 90%
of the beet seeds may be broken down
into one germ, thus eliminating that
expensive thinning process, and this
may mean a great increase in the

l __

production of the industries," he said.
"As many by-products as possible
should be taken from the large
amount of waste materials."
Waste Can Be Used
Rogers explained that sugar beets
are a source of carbohydrates or vita-
min supplements which are convert-
ed into useful chemiacls by fermen-
tation processes involving the use of
bacteria, yeast, or moulds.
Thus the wastes of millions of,
pounds of sugar beets left lying on
the field could be concentrated and
used as supplements in industrial
fermentation industries, and its dis-
tribution is governed by government
regulations.
All of the fermentation materials
are vital in the war industries, Rog-
ers explained. Ethyl alcohol goes -in-
to explosives and rubber, and deriva-
tives of butyl alcohol are used in lac-
quers and paints in war industries
and in the manufacture of smokeless
powder.
The grant of money for the re-
search work was given to the bacter-
iology department by the Farmers
and Manufacturers Beet Sugar As-
sociation of Saginaw, Michigan.

Work with Sugar Beets

_. .

& aCQ;kept
TENNI.S RACQUET RESTRiNGIi4tG

Nicolai Grundtvig's life and works
will be discussed at the Wesleyan
Foundation meeting at 5 p.m. today
at the Methodist Church.
Grundtvig was a Danish bishop
noted for his interest and help in co-
operatives and "folk schools," adult
education institutions. Students tak-
ing part will be Arlene Caster, '44, as
chairman with Josephine Warner,
Berry-Chaplin
TrAl ToBegin
Second Week
By The Associated Press
LOS ANGELES, March 25.-The
movie colony's trial-of-the-year, the
United States versus Charles Spencer
Chaplin,. goes into its second week
Tuesday with the defense blocked
from pursuing the line of testimony
it tried to open up Friday-Joan
Berry's relations, if any, with anoth-
er man.
The white-haired comedian's trial
on Mann Act charges, a magnet for
hundreds of curious spectators con-
tent to stand in the hall if they can't
get seats in the big courtroom, re-
cessed Friday for three days.
The 54-year-old British-born fun-
nyman is accused in a Federal indict-
ment of transporting 24-year-old
Joan from Hollywood to New York
and back in late 1942 for immoral
purposes.

'45, Ruth Duell, '46, and Pvt. Clar-
ence Sonntag
Supper will preceed the talk to be
given by Prof. Bennett Weaver of the
English department todthe Congre-
gational-Disciples Guild at 5 p.m.
His title will be "The Last Reserve."
Arthur Sinclair, Detroit artist, will
give a chalk talk on "Building for
Tomorrow" to the Westminster Guild
at 6 p.m. His address will be illus-
trated by pictures drawn as he
speaks.
"What Does It Mean To Be a
Christian" willbe the topic discussed
by Rev. Ralph Dunlop, associate min-
ister of the Methodist Church, when
the Roger Williams group meets at 5
p.m. today.
Open House will be held by the
Canterbury Club at 6 p.m. today 4n
Page Hall with supper following.
Two more Lent luncheons will be
given at 12:20 p.m. on Wednesdays
in Page Hall.
Father Mark will conclude his ser-
ies of sermons on "40' Hours of De-
votions" at 7:30 p.m. today at St.
Mary's Chapel.
Lutheran Student Asociation will
start its program. with a social hour
at 5:30 p.m. in the Zion Parish Hall.
Gamma Delta will meet at 5 p.m. at
the Student Center.
Luncheons To Be Held ...
Inter-Guild luncheons will again
be given at 12:15 p m. on Wednes-
days in Lane Hall, it was announced
yesterday.

NOW!

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Contract Rates on Request
HELP WANTED-MALE
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HELP WANTED
STUDENT-Men and women. Good
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WANTED: Dictaphone operator. Ex-
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