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March 26, 1944 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1944-03-26

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VOL. LIV No. 103 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 26. 1944

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Soviet Forces Are 8

Miles from Rumania

European
Citi.es H it
By. Allies
73 Bombers Lost
In Last Berlin Raid
2,800 Tons Loosed
By The Associated Press
LONDON, March 26, Sunday.-
Royal Air Force heavy bombers-
making a prompt follow-up to their
massive raid on Berlin Friday night
when more than 2,800 tons of explo-
sives were rained on the battered
German capital-roared across the
English Channel last night to strike
again at continental targets.
Nazi Defensive Strong
The force over one area seemed
smaller than the nearly 1,000 bomb-
ers which, in Friday night's opera-
tions, beat through the fiercest de-
fense the Germans yet have thrown
about their capital and punched
lightly at other Nazi cities at a cost
of 73 big planes.
It was the heaviest loss ever sus-
tained over Berlin-presumably most
of the bombers fell in airway battles
to or over the city-but the assault
lifted to some 35,000 tons the weight
of bombs hurled on the hub city of
Germany since last Nov. 18.
Last night's bombweight on Berlin
equalled the record mark poured
down on it by the RAF Feb. 15.
Kiel Also Hit
The RAF bomber command sent
cut more than 1,000 planes in the
night parade with some hitting at
the Baltic Sea port of Kiel and other
objectives. The Germans said Leip-
zig and Weimar also were hit and
that 112 planes were downed.
U.S. Medium Marauders covered
by Thunderbolt fighters slashed at
the rail city of Hirson in northern
France today, continuing the air
offensive against rail targets. Hir-
son, near the Belgian border, is a
junction of lir es leading to several
French port cities.
Four War Uenteri in Flames
The Berlin blow climaxed one of
the most terrific 60-hour bombing
periods of the war leaving four of
Germany's great war centers burn-
ing tonight,
In addition to the capital they are
the naval base of Kiel, the aircraft
manufacturing and rail city of
Frankfurt and the ball-bearing fac-
tory center of Schweinfurt.
As the British bonibers were ham-
mering Berlin, the Germans were re-
taliating with the longest attack on
London in more than a year, sending
about 100 planes through to rain
down fire and explosive bombs.
Delta Gamma~c
TopsQuota
Sorority Wins Thanks
Of Red Cross for $100
Delta Gamma sorority, which was
assigned a quota of $43.50 for the lo-
cal Red Cross Drive and subsequent-
,ly topped it by $100, is the recipient
of congratulations from Red Cross
Headquarters' for the manner in
which members of the house went
aboutereaching the high returns.
When the money was turned in to
RedCross Headquarters in North
Hall, a Daily reporter learned that
members of Delta Gamma had spent
the past two weeks working on the
switchboard at the headquarters and

instead =of keeping the money they
were paid for the work, turned in
their checks as their contribution to
the Red Cross Drive.
As a result of this effort on the part
of twenty Delta Gamma women, the,
sorority topped its quota by 331 per
cent or more than $4 per woman. No
other campus house has even closely
approximated this high percentage as
yet, and Red Cross Headquarters
has extended its thanks to Delta
Gamma for the house's splendid co-
operation in the current Red Cross
Drive.
University men are within $200 of
their $1,500 goal and University wo-
men have passed the $1,500 mark in
their drive to reach a goal, of $3,500.
Washtenaw County returns reveal
that the county has approximately
f nn . - 4-, m-,a + nal rof2 t. -

Inadequate Lighting inLibrary Is Revealed'

See for your self if you can, but it is a very difficult task in the
study rooms of the A' ain Library, as results of a Daily survey con-
ducted Friday and yesterday revealed.-
Accurate light readings were taken to determine the efficiency of
the lighting system in the main reading room, the Medical reading room
and the main floor study hall.
These are the foot candle results:
Main Reading Room (flat on table)-4.5 foot candles (note picture).
Main Reading Room (in normal reading position)-4 foot candles.
Main Reading Room (reclined position-student preference)-3
foot candles.
Medical Reading Room-5 foot candles.
Main Floor Study Hall-6 foot candles.
According to scientific research made by a well-known electrical or-
ganization, PROPER LIGHTING FOR ORDINARY NEWSPAPER
READING SHOULD BE BETWEEN 20-30 FOOT CANDLES.
The best lighting available in the Main Library-used by approxi-
mately 3,500 students each week-is 6 FOOT CANDLES IN THE
MAIN FLOOR STUDY HALL.
Complaints have been prevalent for many years decrying the poor
study facilities in the library-the center of student study work, and as
far as our records show, this has been done to rectify the situation:
1. In 1938-39, the director of the library noted in the annual
president's report that the lighting was poor. Result: the ceilings and
walls were washed.

This was acknowledged as a move
in the right direction by Prof. Hen-
ry Higbie of the electrical engin-
eering department, yesterday. He
added, however, that more frequent
cleaning not only of the walls and
ceiling but also of the globes and
reflectors in the table lamps in the
main reading room was vital to ef-
ficient lighting.
YES, THE WALLS WERE
CLEANED FIVE YEARS AGO.
These tests were made at night
when most students frequent the li-
brary and a poll of students there
Friday evening indicated that .they
all place the main reading room at
the bottom of their list of available
places to study.
When questioned about the situ-
ation, Richard Lee Rovit, '45 (pic-
ture at right), sai that he found the
conditions unbearable but that "I
am forced to go there to use certain
reference books."
HOW MANY OTHER ST U-
DENTS ARE HAVING THEIR
VISION IMPAIRED BECA USE
THEY MUST USE THE REFER-
ENCE ROOM?
Pfc. L. H. Krohn of Company G,
a medical student (picture at left),
acknowledged the same situation
and said he found the main floor
study hall the best lighted room inl
the library.

THE BEST LIGHTED ROOM IN THE LIBRARY ONLY PUTS
6 FOOT CANDLES ON A PRINTED PAGE-F AR BELOW ADE-
QUATE LIGHTING.
More than 90 per cent of students polled in the library agreed that
the lighting was poor.
But what are the prospects for the future? What plans are being
considered to improve the situation?
The annual President's Report issued for 1939-40 indicated im-
provements in the lighting of the Graduate Reading Rooms (where
under-graduate students are not permitted), the Main Floor Study
Hall (bringing it to its present point of 6 foot candles), and the Medi-.
cal Reading Room.
The report further stated that "this new lighting is not wholly satis-
factory-there is too much glare."
The subject of lighting improvement was completely ignored in the
report for 1940-41, as it was in the next two reports.
.With the air filled with post-war planning, the University prepared
x comprehensive document-Post-War Public Works program-in De-
cember, 1943, detailed plans and specifications to improve the physical
plant were published.
NO MENTION WAS MADE TO IMPROVE THE LIGHT-
ING IN THE MAIN LIBRARY-ADMITTEDLY POOR.
Yes, see for yourself in the Main Library.
F

Maintain
Stand on
D niester
Erect 50-Mile
Bridgehead Across
From Czernowitz
By The Associated Press
LONDON, March 26, Sunday-The
Red Army plunged to within eight
miles of Rumania's eastern border
yesterday and erected a 50-mile in-
vasion bridgehead on the Dnister
River just across from Czernowit,
Rumania's northern capital in Bu-
covina and key to the Balkans, Mos-
cow announced today.
Hurling the Germans back toward
the Carpathian Mountains tie Rus-
sians were only 18 miles from strate-
gic Czernowitz, and 17 miles from
Hitler's rail backbone-the Buchar-
est-Lwow railway running through
that city. The loss of the line would
split the German eastern front.
The Russians also toppled the west
Ukraine stronghold o f Proskurov.
breaking into the city from east and
west, and fought their way into the
outskirts of the Black Sea port of
Nikolaev, Moscow said.
Score Successes
Other impressive successes scored
by the Russians on a front extending
from old Poland southeast to the
Black Sea included a 20-mile gain
south of by-passed Tarnopol in Po-
land, the severing of the Byeltsi-Iasi
railway in central Bessarabia as Sov-
iet troops streamed southward to-
ward the Danube, and the overrun-
ning of a Nazi rail escape route in the
Slobodzeye sector 110 miles north-
west of Odessa, the communique said.
Thousands of Germans were killed
by the Russians on a front extending
from old Poland southeast to the
Black Sea included a 20-mile gain.
south of by-passed Tarnopol in Po-
land, the severing of the Byeltsi-Iasi
railway in central Bessarabiaas So-
viet troops streamed southward t-
ward the Danube, and the overrun-
ning of a Nazi rail escape route in
the Slobodzeya sector .110 iiles
northwest of Odessa, the communi-
que said.
Control 160 Miles of River
The Russians now control almost
160 miles of the river. Soviet units
fanning out along the Dniester be-
tween Mogilev Podolski and Kamen-
ets Podosk were attempting to bag
the Germans falling back from Pros-
kurov.
(Radio France at Algiers quoted
Franz Von Papen, German Ambas-
sador to Turkey, as having declared
that the German army "perhaps"
would abandon Bessarabia, establish,
a Carpathian Mountain defense line,
and try to plug the 130-mile gap be-
tween the mountains and the Black
Sea with German and satellite troops
to defend the Rumanian Ploesti il
regions "at all costs."
Capture Zagaikany
The broadcast was reported by the
U.S. foreign broadcast intelligence
service.)
Seventy miles southeast of Czerno-
witz, Rumania's third largest city,
other Soviet units attacking west-
ward in Bessarabia on a 5-mile
front captured Zagaikany, only eight
miles from the Prut River, boundary
of Rumania proper.
I_ 1 S

Female Lead Rol
Has It,' Co. D's SI
Judy.Chayes, Bette Sod
To Head Comedy; Ch
Judy Chayes, Bette Soper and Syl-
via Nycamp have been selected as
the coeds to play the female leads
in "Rumor Has It," Co. D's original
musical comedy, Pfc. Arty Fischer,
director of the show, announced yes-
terday.
Judy, the romantic lead, will be
played by Miss Chayes. Miss Soper
will enact the role of Maddy, the
comedy lead. Miss Nycamp has been
chosen to play Irene, the vamp.
39 Coeds in Show
It is planned now to have a total
of 39 coeds in the show. The follow-
ing women will comprise the singing
chorus: Rika Drews, Pat Heusties,
Jean Hoinville, Lois Kritchman, Mary
Lou Rookus, Laurie Orr, Screne Shep-
pard, Pearl Margolie, Jean Gilman,
Wage Disputes
Slow T'ru.cking'
Solution Not in Sight
For Employes, WLB
By The Associated Press
Freight continued to move on a
curtailed basis in a number of Michi-
gan cities today and loading docks
showed growing accumulations as a
wage-and-hours dispute between the
War Labor Board and trucking com-
pany employes appeared still fat
from a solution.
Protesting a VLB ruling thatde-
nied them overtime except for work
in excess of 54 hours weekly, truck,
drivers, loaders and checkers insti-
tuted a 48-hour work week in six
cities and 40 hours in at least three
others. In Grand Rapids where work
was on a 40-hours weekly basis, a

es for 'Rumor
Low, Chosen
per, Sylvia Nycamnp
orus Includes 21 Coeds
Barbara Jean White, Dot Nesbit, Jean
Laird, Pat Gordon, Martha Shepler,
Peggy Weiss and Dale Moses.
Included in the dancing chorus are:
Ruth Weinberg, Helen Dingwall,
Betty Vaughn, Peg Kohr, Pat Du-
Pont, Virginia Rohr, Elaine Kattle-
man, Jan Carter, Hazel Ruettinger,
Mary Palmer, Mary Jean Winfield,
Phyllis Banbrook, Mary Scott, Mar-
jorie Ann Sadler, Margaret Cook,
Pat Burton, June Lome, Catherine
Cook, Pearl Eisler and Kay Burton.
Male casting for the show has al-
ready begun and will be completed
this week. -
Difficult Choice
Fischer said that a very large num-
ber of the coeds who tried out were
very taletted and that it was very
difficult to make the final cast se-
lections. Although the feminine cast-
ing is now practically completed,
there will probably be a few more
women chosen for lead roles.
Fischer has called a special meet-
ing of the entire cast for 8 p.m.
Wednesday in the USO ballroom, and
said that important matters relating
to rehearsal schedule will be discussed
at that time.
According to present plans the
comedy will be produced during the
later part of May at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.

Yanks Bomb
Wake Island
For 16th Time
By The Associated Press
U. S. PACIFIC FLEET HEAD-j
QUARTERS, Pearl Harbor, March!
25.-Wake Island was blasted by U.S.
Seventh Air Force Liberators in the
second bombing raid this month and
the 16th since Japanese forces cap-
tured the little American island, Ad-
miral Chester W. Nimitz announced
today.
Oil storage tanks and barracks
areas were hit. A total of 115 tons
of bombs *ere unloaded in a series
of attacks ranging from Wake,
through four Marshall Island atolls
to Ponape and Ant Island in the
eastern Carolines.
Liberator crews reported they en-
countered intense antiaircraft fire
over Wake. But Nimitz reported that
all planes returned from each of the
central Pacific operations.
U.S. Shells Island
Inz Adml~iralty Group
ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN
SOUTHWEST PACIFIC, March 26,
Sunday-(AP)- American destroyers
have shelled Pityilu Island in the
Admiralties, on the northern fringe
of Seadler Harbor, which United
States soldiers took under their con-
trol when they captured Lorengau,
on Manus Island, March 18.

German Paratroops Halt Attack
By New Zealanders on Cassino
Nazis Move More Tanks into Continental
Hotel, General Positions Changed Little

By The Associated Press
ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NA-
PIES, March 25.-New Zealand
troops attempting to drive westward
through -Cassino were pinned down
in their southern section of the rub-
bled town today by highly-trained
German parachute troops ordered to
hold their positions at all costs.
(Berlin and Rome radios broadcast
reports that Allied forces have
launched strong attacks against the
Nazi troops in the western and north-
ern sectors of Cassino. The broad-
casts, which were unconfirmed from
Allied sources, were recorded by
NBC.)
The New Zealanders and the para-
chutists were fighting stubbornly and
throwing tons of shells at one anoth-
er ,but without effecting much change
in the general situation, Allied Head-
quarters announced.
The Germans, however, managed
to move three more tanks into theI
lobby of the Continental Hotel, and
a bitter fight between tanks and ar-
tillery also raged around the Hotel
TDes Roses.
Artillery fire which shook the
mountainous battle area also reach-
ed positions in the rear as the Allies
sought to prevent the Germans from
strengthening their hold on the Ver-
dum-like Cassino sector. But the

Germans, commanded by Lt. Gen.
Richard Heindrich to hold at all
costs, were believed to have the ad-
vantage of anci'ent tunnels honey-
combing Abbey Hill.
Play Production
Will Present
"She Stoops To Conquer," the next
offering of Play Production of the
Department of Speech, will be pro-
duced April 12 through 15 at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The play was written by Oliver
Goldsmith, who ranks with Sheridan
as the outstanding dramatist of the
eighteenth century in England.
The comedy is about Marlow, a
bashful and reserved young man of
the world who goes with a friend to
visit the Iardcastles. Losing their
way at night, they are directed to a
nearby inn which proves to be the
Hardcastles' house. Marlow makes
love to Hardcastle's daughter, under
the impression that she is a servant.
From then on, the play proceedE
through pranks and jokes to its
climax.

l
a
L
r
4
r
s

Senior(as
Pe'titions Du
Lists To Be in Student
Offices by Wednesday
Petitions are due this week for
candidates in the campus election of
senior class officers and Union vice-
presidents to be held April 5.
Those seeking positions as senior
class officers must have their peti-
tions, containing a list of qualifica-
tions and 25 signatures, in the stu-
dent offices of the Union by 5 p.m.
iWednesday.
Candidates for Union vice-presi-
dents should submit their petitions
to the student offices by Friday. No
signatures are required on these peti-
tions. Interviews will be .held from
3 to 5 p.m. Friday by the Union
nominating committee to select the
candidates. This committee is com-
posed of five Union members who
have been appointed and approved
b, th 1,..,4 ,-d ,.tnric

FILLED WITH NAZI SNIPERS:
Continenta l Hotel Withstands Violent Bombing

By LYNN HEINZERLING
Associated Press Correspondent
ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NA-
pt, Mrarch 25 -Verv few hotels in

sturdy, stone construction and the
fact that it is somewhat protected
in the lee of Monastery Hill has savedj
it from heing reduced like most other

windows of the lobby with the
heavy guns of two tanks which had
been run inside.
Sniners drifted before its windows

astery Hill from the east then
turns sharply south to swing around
the hill.
It is extremely important because

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