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March 23, 1944 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1944-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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WARRIOR-STATESMAN:
Dr. Shepher~d Defines Chinese
Lea der 's iMot~iv es, Pinnpkes

JOB TURNOVER IN FUTURE:
6ohei DiS~msseg Employmuent After War

Pears tait China would lose Pi'Y
freedom from outside nations press-
ing in led Chiang Kai-Shek to decide
to be a warrior-statesman and the
leader that he is today, Dr. George
Shepherd told his audience yesterday
at the Rackham lecture hall.
"From his experiences in a large
Chinese city and as an officer in the
Japanese Army for two years, he
realized the ones who handled the
real power of government; the per-
sons who actually ran things carried
on underground with the elected of-
ficials having no political control."
Dr. Shepherd said his first battles
were against this type of enemy, the
war lords, with wars against the
armed revolutionists and Japan fol-
lowing."
"The Generalissimo is devoting his
whole life to the cause of national
unity of China and thus met the
greatest test of his day. Three prin-
ciples for which he is striving are a

strong independent China, with the
government in the hands of the peo-
ple and an adequate livelihood for
all," Dr. Shepherd added.
Co- op A uhority
Dr. James P. Warbasse, president
emeritus of the Cooperative League
of the United States will speak on
["Cooperatives in the Post-War
World," at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the
Robert Owen Cooperative House.
Dr. Warbasse is an internationally
known cooperative leader and writer.
Author of "Cooperative Democracy"
and of a book on Cooperative Medi-
cine plans, Dr. Warbasse has traveled
extensively throughout Europe and
America leading the Cooperative
movement.
ra

WENDELL L. WILLKIE (above), on a swing through Wisconsin seeking
support for his campaign as Republican nominee for President, visits
the building at Ripon, Wis., which is said to be the birthplace of the
Republican Party. -AP Photo

Tonight at 8:30
Distinguished Authority on World Travel

"THE BEAUTIFUL ITALY WE KNEW"
with Motion Pic/zrcs
Tickets $I.10, 83c, 55c (tax mc.) Special Rates to Servicemen
Box Office open today 10-1, 2-5, 7-8:30
ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION - HILL AUDITORIUM
11~ - - -

Will Rehearse
Coeds in Junior Play
To Practice in League
The dancing chorus of Junior Girls
Play, which will entertain the cam-
pus' senior women Thursday, April
27, in the Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, will hold its first rehearsal at
4 p~m. today in the rehearsal room
of the League, according to Beverly
Wittan, '46, co-chairman of dances
for the production.
The singing and dancing casts for
the musical comedy were announced
yesterday by Marcia Nettine, '45, co-
chairman of the singing. Her group
will rehearse at 4 p.m. Wednesday in
the League rehearsal room.
The fifteen coeds who were named-
for numbers which involve both dan-
cing and singing are Georgianna
Leslie, Eleanor MacLaughlin, Doris
Chapman, June Willard, Marion Gil-
breath, Jean Harkness, Barb ara
Eddy, June Nieboer, Mickey Kuech-
enmeister, Maurine Harwood, Gule-
kin Aga-Oglu, Jean Wick, Peg Pil-
liod, Bette Soper and Jean Gaffney.
Additional singers are Joyce Den-
Herder, Betsy Follin, Alice Pyle, Jean
Colley, Kay Shilson, Barbara Fitch,
Frances Goldberg, Mary Ecklis, Jerry
Psciuk, Phyllis Crawford and Miss
Netting.
Dancers are Rudy Bailes, Frances
Popkins, Jean Aldridge, Peg Lauben-
gayer, Anne Stanton, Jane Gourley,
Jane Shute, Pam Watts, Mary Jane
Janiga, Margaret Saults, Ronnie
Leitner, Beverly Gotschall, Shirley
Keddy, Betsy Parry, Ruth McMorri-;
son, Eleanor Wetmore, Phyllis Sau-
berns, Betsy Whitehouse, Josephine
Holmes, Charlotte Haas, Peg Weiss
and Barbara Linehan.

D I S T I N C 1I' V E

GLFSSUJRRE

F rosh Frolie'
W11 Be Held
Plans Are Announced
For Costume Affair
"Frosh Frolic," get-together for
the women of '47 which replaces
their annual dance, promises an eve-
ning of fun and entertainment for all
freshman coeds from 8-10 p.m. to-
morrow in Waterman Gymnasium,
according to Estelle Klein, chairman
of the central committee of the '47
Corps.
Chip the Squirrel, mascot of the '47
Corps, will be guest of honor at the
Frolic. Dean Alice C. Lloyd and Miss
Marie D. Hartwig of the physical ed-
ucation department will both present
individual numbers at the costume
affair, while Miss Ethel McCormick,
social director of the League, will
lead a Conga line.
Prizes will be awarded for the best
skits which are to be judged by mem-
bers of the Women's War Council,
and for perfect attendance from the
houses, dorms and zones. Skits and
group singing will comprise the main
part of the evening's entertainment.
All freshman women whether or
not they participate in skits are ex-
pected to wear original costumes
made of any available materials.
Members of Faculty
Go to Music Meeting
Profs. Palmer Christian, Gilbert
Ross, David Mattern, Clyde Vroman.
John Lowell and Earl V. Moore of the
faculty of the School of Music are
attending the annual meeting of the
Music Teachers National Association
in joint sessions with .the National
Association of Schools of Music, which
convened yesterday in Cincinnati, 0.
Educators in the field of music
from all parts of the United States
are meeting for the three-day ses-
sion to discuss the general subject
of "Music in War-and Peace."
Representatives from every field of
professional and educational music
activities, including Lt. Col. Howard
Bronson, Music Section of the United
States Army, and Lt. James N. Thur-
mond, director, Navy School of Mu-
sic, are attending the meeting.

of MiCliiTtii wtlI nave to find new
jobs after this war" declared Albert
Cohen of the Detroit Vocational
Guidance Institute Tuesday night in
an address delivered at the Hillel
Foundation.
"Thus Michigan will have the
highestsemployment reconversion ra-
tio of any state in the country," he
added.
Traces Work Treids
Cohen, in sketching employment
trends and discrimination during the
period after the last war to the pres-
ent time, pointed out that after the
first world war, lawyers and doctors'
in many instances were driving taxi-
cabs in order to make a living. After
this war, he continued, the situation
will be radically different, since there
will not be enough lawyers or doctors
to fill the needs of the nation.
Six Months for Reconversion
"Reconversion will probably take
about six months although it is im-
possible to say definitely how long it
. .
Highlights
On Campus...
Glee Club .. .
Tryouts for places in the Univer-
sity Women's Glee Club will be held
at 4 p.m. tomorrow in the Kalamazoo
Room in the League, Patty Spore,
president of the Glee Club, an-
nounced yesterday.
All women on campus are eligible
to try out for the Glee Club, which
is directed by Bill Sawyer.
Summer Camp Jobs .. .
All girls interested in employ-
ment in summer camps and resorts
should register this week and the
beginning of next at the Bureau of
Appointments and Vocational Gui-
dance, 201 Mason hall.
The Bureau, which has been re-
ceiving numerous mail requests
and personal calls for counselors
in girls' camps points out that most
summer camps have their staff
completed by the early part of
April, so the girls are urged to
register immediately.
Rifle Club To Meet.. .
The Rifle Club will meet at 5 p.m.
tomorrow in the WAB to sign up for
the new shooting period for this
semester.
Daily Meetingsa. .
There will be a meeting at 4 p.m.
tomorrow in the Publications Buil-
ding for all women interested in
working:on the women's staff of
The Daily. F'or further informna-
tion women may call Mary Anne
Olson at 2-2591 or leave their
names on the women's bulletin
board at The Daily.
There will be a meeting of The
Daily Business Staff at 4:15 p.m.
today. All members must attend.
French Club To Meet ...
The French Club will hold a meet-
ing at 7:30 p.m. today in the League
to honor the ASTP men who are
studying French at the University.

willi i: 1: :c t (. l ; i ,tI. ri m " C.'ul n
asserted. "Those hardest hit by this
process will be the youth in war
industries and government employ-
ees. Veterans, returning from the
war, both men and women, will nat-
urally get priority in peacetime jobs."
"The employment picture for the
future has some brighter aspects,"

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'tOh ;:ttd., "Fo one thing, priv-
ate industry and the WMC are mak-
ing plans for absorbing the post-war
unemployed. Labor unions already
have outlined their plans for recon-
version, and the government will
probably pass necessary social legis-
lation to fit the needs of those with-
out jobs," he pointed out.

"BETTER CARE-
LESS REPAIR"

by HE.ISEY

ADD CHARM TO YOUR ROOMS WITIH
FINE CANDLESTICKS, ASH TRAYS, BOWLS, PLATES,
AND ORNAMENTAL SWANS, DUCKS, OR BIRDS
308 SOUTH STATE STREET Phone 3709
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SCOLLINS

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One SUPERB suit for
Easter and all thru Spring.
Choose yours from our
assortment of gabardines
and soft wools in lovely
pastel shades. Wear it cas-
ually or dress it up with
a frillyblo'se.
Wools ......$25-$35
Gabordines .. $35-$50
Sizes 9-20

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ry. j.Iy
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because repairmen and materials
HAVE GONE TO WAR!
What are your electric appliances made of?
Copper, steel, brass, zinc, aluminum, nickel,
rubber... materials vital to war production,
needed to make weapons for our fighting
men. These materials have gone to war. That
is why repair parts for many home appli-
ances are not now available.
The man who used to fix your washer or
refrigerator may now be repairing tanks on
the battlefield. The man who serviced your
radio may be repairing a "walkie-talkie"
under fire. Your neighborhood "handyman"
may be working on airplane engines in
Britain or the South Seas.
So take good care of your household electric
appliances. They must last until Victory.
You may not be able to get them repaired.
Today your ELECTRIC servants are
often the only kind available: Treat them
considerately!
Published in cooperation with the
NATIONAL APPLIANCE CONSERVATION PROGRAM

2 r e 36e3

coat3
This spring you expect a lot
of a coat. Obligingly, it's cut
to look well over almost any
type of costume.

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The most important part of
your wardrobe - Pretty as
your heart could want- and
practical as your head could
wish.

Ready for your smoothest
date-T he way you like to
look in the dress you like to
wear.
Junior sizes from size 7.
Misses sizes from size 10.

Boxy boys coats-s

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