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April 30, 1943 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Secretary Sees
Gieit hlnge
In East Quad
Only Familiar Faces
In Military Group Are
Former Dorm Boys
By MARJ BORRADAILE
"The Army has altered the whole
setup for me," trimly-coiffured Mrs.
Florence Sprentall, secretary of mili-
tary East Quadrangle and former
acting house director of the dorm,
said yesterday.
"I used to know all the 400 stu-
dents who lived in the dorm in peace-
time and now I can't say that I know
more than four of the army group
living here. Those four are old East
Quad boys.
"Then I sat behind the main desk
in the hall. The boys came to me
for stamps, to arrange for dinner
guests, and for advice in all their
troubles," she continued. Now Mrs.
Sprentall, the only one left of the
old staff of five, sits behind a door
marked "Dietician's Office" where
she carries on the secretarial duties
of the quadrangle.
. Mrs. Sprentall pointed out the dif-
ferences in the old and neT. quad
life. "The boys have to be in bed at
an early hour in the evening now,"
she said. "Before they could stay up
as late as they wanted to. There are
no more dances in the dining room
or no more exchange dinners. I don't
eat with the servicemen," she added,
"but I always ate with the boys."
"Yes, it's a changed place," she
said, "but I'm not complaining."
Dr. Reed Wil
Talk at Church
Senior Banquet
Dr. Marshall R. Reed, pastor of
the Nardin Park Methodist Church,
will be the main speaker at the an-
nual banquet honoring seniors and
graduates to be held at 6 p.m. today
in the First Methodist Church.
Hobart Taylor, '43 is chairman
of the committee planning the ban-
quet. The toastmaster will be Gregor
Hileman, '43, and Mildred Yxall,
Grad., will speak for the honored
graduates.
Lois Moore, '43, will lead the group
singing, accompanied at the piano by
Robert Gosling, '44. The invocation
will be given by Geneva Warner, '43,
and the benediction will be pro-
nounced by Ruth Sanford, '43.
MEDICAL SMOKER TO BE HELD
The annual Medical Smoker for
students in the School of Medicine
will be held at 8 p.m. Tuesday, May
4, in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

Destroyed Enemy Sub

Lieut. Richard E. Schreder
(above) of Toledo, O., wearing a
Distinguished Flying Cross, is cred-
ited with piloting a Navy patrol
bomber, which caught an enemy
submarine on the surface of the
Atlantic several months ago and
destroyed it with depth charges.
Highlights
On Campus ...
Honor Officers Elected
At a dinner meeting held Wednes-
day night at the Union, Tau Beta
Pi, national honorary engineering so-
ciety, elected officers for the coming
year. They are as follows: Presi-
dent, Warren Burgess, '43E; vice-
president, Worthy Boyd, '43E; sec-
retary, Art Geib, '44E; recording sec-
retary, Fred Wellington, '44E; cata-
loguer, James Bingham, '44E, and
Engineering Council representative,
Caleb Warner, '44E.
Phi Kappa Phi's Initiated
Phi Kappa Phi, senior honorary
society, will admit 105 students to
membership at its semi-annual vi-.
tiation and dinner to be held at 6
p.m. today in the ballroom of the
Michigan League.
Dean Alice C. Lloyd will present
the annual scholastic award, given
to the ,student who has maintained
the best record through his college
career. The address will be delivered
by Dr. Malcolm H. Soule, Professor
of Bacteriology and Chairman of the
Hygienic Laboratory. Dr. Soule's
topic, will be "Infectious Diseases in
South America."
* * *
Dr. Hooker Will Lecture
Dr. Davenport Hooker, head of
the Department of Anatomy at the
University of Pittsburgh, will speak
on "The Origin of Overt Behavior"
at 4:15 p.m. tomorrow in the Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.l

Talk by Tarma
W ill Highlight
Co-op Conclave
Lecture Will Stress
Relation of 'U' Co-ops
To National Federation
Highlight of the Midwest Federa-
tion of Campus Cooperatives Con-
vention this week-end will be the
speech by William Torma of the
Central States Cooperative at 1:30
tomorrow in the Union.
"The Relation of the Campus Co-
operatives to the Cooperative Move-
ment as a Whole" is the topic of Mr.
Torma's lecture. He will stress the
part which specialists, such as engi-
neers, may play in the cooperative
movement. After Mr. Torma's talk
movies of cooperative activities will
be shown. The public is invited to
attend this meeting.
The theme of the semi-annual
meeting will be a blueprint for the
future of the federation, which will
be presented for discussion at 8:30
p.m. today in the Robert Owen Co-
op House. -Herm Epstein, Grad.,
President of the M.F.C.C., will pre-
side at this meeting.
"Education, Personnel and Finance
in the Blueprint" will be the topic
of a panel discussion to be held at
9:30 a.m. tomorrow in the Union.
After Mr. Torma's speech Satur-
day, delegates and members of the
University campus cooperatives will
meet to break ground for the ICC
Victory Garden near the Fair
Grounds. A wiener roast and dance
will be held after work on the farm
has been completed.
The convention will conclude its
activities Sunday at a business meet-
ing. Officers will be elected and the
revised blueprint will be officially
adopted.
White's Portrait
Presented to 'U'
350 Attend Dinner
In Honor of Birthday
A portrait of Prof. Alfred H. White,
founder of the Department of Chem-
ical Engineering was presented to
the University at a dinner held yes-
terday in the Union in honor of his
seventieth birthday.
Harvey Mercker, '09E, of the Parke
Davis Co., Detroit, was toastmaster
at the banquet which more than 350
alumni and friends attended. Imme-
diately after dinner the Men's Glee
Club, conducted by David Mattern,
sang. a few numbers including
"Happy Birthday" for Prof. White.
Among the many guest speakers]
were President Alexander G. Ruth
ven, Dean Ivan C. Crawford of the
Engineering chool and Shirley W.
Smith, vice-president and secetary
of the University. A reception was
held after the banquet and program.,

-. -.-. tt .k il t.4.itr
May 19 to May 25, 1943
Note: For courses having both lectures and quizzes, the time of
exercise is the time of the first lecture period of the week; for courses
having quizzes only, the time of exercise is the time of the first quiz
period.
Drawing and laboratory work may be continued through the
examination period in amount equal to that normally devoted to such
work during one week.
Certain courses will be examined at special periods as noted below
the regular schedule. All cases of conflicts between assigned examina-
tion periods must be reported for adjustment. See bulletin board
outside of Room 3209 East Engineering Building between May 10 and
May 14 for instruction. To avoid misunderstandings and errors, each
student, should receive notification from his instructor of the time
and place of his appearance in each course during the period May
19 to May 25.
No date of examination may be changed without the consent of
the Classification Committee.

A meeting of the Michigan Com-
munity Work Conference, attended
by citizens instrumental to com-
munity participation in the war ef-
fort, will be held all day today in the
League,
The conference is designed to fa-
eilitate an interchange of ideas and
methods for stimulating communi--{
ties to greater war activity. The in-
dividuals who are attending will rep-
resent, a cross-section of the citiws
and towns of the Lower Peninsula.
The conference will be opened at
9:30 a.m. by Dr. Howard Y. McClusky
of the School of Education. Dr.
McClusky will welcome the delegates
and speak briefly on the purposes of
the meeting. The program to follow
will be divided into three panel dis-
cussions, a concluding discussion, in-
dividual conferences and dinner and
luncheon at the League.
The morning session will deal with
community adjustments to the im-
pact of the war and will be led by
James Lewis of Dowagiac. George
Alder of Detroit will lead the first of
two afternoon discussions. The topic
to be considered will be post-war
community planning. Russel Had-
don of Fenton will be chairman of
the meeting on leadership in com-

munity programs. The leader for
the summarizing discussion is Prof.
Wesley Maurer of the journalism
department.
Dr. Clyde Vroman of the School of
Music will demonstrate the use of
music in community work during the
luncheon.
r= = = = = -_ -_-_=_____
HOSIERY SPECIAL
Very Sheei' Ray de Chine
Extra Wearing Quality
$1.15
very Slwvi Rayon scalerss
$1.00
SLACKS
e-back Slacks with the pat-
ented drop seat . .. Is not only
convenient, but adds to Fit.
Comes in Navy, Brown, or
'Green in Nice Quality Gab-
ardine.
$5.95
SMARTEST
' HOSIERY SHOPPE
Michigan Theatre Bldg.
BUY WAR BONDS & STAMPS

Time of Exercise

Time of Examination

(

Monday
Tuesday

at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at
at-
at
at
at
at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3'

Monday, May 24
Tuesday, May 25
Wednesday, May 19
Wednesday, May19
Thursday, May 20
Tuesday, May 25
Saturday, May 22
Tuesday, May 25
Friday, May 21
Thursday, May 20
Wednesday, May 19
Saturday, May 22
Friday, May 21
Thursday, May 20

(i M Alt')1 c; 4, 4A 11-14.I'l :14 'N i
- --
IAiII-1 I~d I(ody aRht

10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2-4
8-10
2-4
2-4
2-4
8-10
8-10
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2-4

C s

Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 102
M. E. 3; Drawing 2
E. E. 2a; Drawing 1, 3
Surv. 4
E. M. 1; E. M. 2; C. E. 2;
Spanish; German
M. P. 2; M. P. 3; M. P. 4;
French

*Thursday, May 20
*Friday, May 21
*Saturday, May 22
*Saturday, May 22
*Monday, May 24
*Monday May 24

2-4
8-10
8-10
2-4
8-10
2-4

11

*This may be used as an irregular period, provided
flict with the regular printed schedule above.

there is no con-

Final Hillel Talk To Be Tonight;
Avukah Will Hear Prof. Fuller

-The last in the series of regular
Friday evening Fireside discussion
groups for the present semester will,
be held at 7:30 p.m. today at the
Hillel Foundation.
The subject for discussion will be,
"Russia, Facts Behind Events." Mrs.
Lila Pargment of the Russian depart-
ment and Prof. Stanley D. Dodge of
the geography department will, be
the featured speakers. Followirg
their lectures, the topic- will be
thrown open to the group for ques-
tions and discussion.
A native Russian, Mrs. Pargment.
received her degree from College
Raiev in Leningrad. Both speakers
participated in the local drive for
'Russian War Relief.
Memorial sefvjces for Sgt. Jack
Shiraga, '42, who was killed last
.month in an airplane accident near
his Texas base, wii precede the-dis-'
cusslon. '-

Prof. Richard C. Fuller of the so-
ciology department will speak on
,"The Place of Minorities in Post-
War America" at 8:15 p.m. Sunday
at the Hillel Foundation.
The meeting will be the last open
meeting of the year sponsored by
Avukah, student Zionist organiza-
tion. Prof. Fuller will discuss the
'probable status of minority groups
In America after the war.
The meeting is open to the pub-
lic. Refreshments will be served.
The Hillel-Avukah Study Group
under the direction of Max Dresden
of the physics department will hold
its regular meeting at 8:30 p.m. Mon-
day at the Foundation.
Gerald Davidson, '43. will lead the
discussion on "The Jews in the Dias-
pora after the War." The public is
its~ited.
.I

IlllIlllp 9 li

11

Start Your Date Early!
Get Her in the Romantic Mood before the Dance!
at the
All-Campus Serenade
TONIGHT

II

All wool PULL-OVERS
,and CARDIGANS
In. captivating
pastels.
from $ .95
The basque of striped
cotton at $1.25.

*~N~

don't let it happen to you!

11

Store them in Hogan-Hayes modern cold
fur storage vaults .. .where you con se-
cure the MOST protection ... at the

d
s.

at 8:30 p.m.

ON THE LIBRARY STEPS

LEAST COST!

So We'll See

You TONIGHT, Huh?

DO IT NOW

' I't !t. uf., , -,,..

i

11

STRICTLY
FORM┬žIL!
The Keynote for Your
Spring Dancing Pleasure
TUNES by SAWYER
at the
ITI1TTI)1T RTITATFl UA1I1IA T

A lifetime of experience in selling and caring for fur coats is
behind the Hogan-Hayes business. Hogan-Hayes deals in fur
coats exclusively. Renowned as fur coat experts, isn't it natural
that you should think FIRST of Hogan-Hayes when you are
about to store that precious fur coat of yours? Here in pre-
ferred scientifically protected space, your fur coat will have
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accidental damage . . . all for as little as $3 (on valuations
up to $150) . . . and you secure complete and guaranteed
protection.
Call 2-5656 or bring your fur coat direct to Hogdn-
Hayes fur storage vaults at 201 South Main Street.
Remember, HOGAN-HAYES' prices are as low and probably
lower than you could secure elsewhere. Estimates on restyling,
repairing or cleaning furnished without obligation. Act now
... tomorrow may be too late!

Buy thatbond today
For that man
who's away!

Checks, plaids, and sol-
id pastels in gored and
pleated styles. From $4.
Also our pet "Trik-
skirt" of lana cloth at
$5.00 and $6.50 - of
botany flannel at $7.95.

IND A!

4

1.

... _'I

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