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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 10, 1943 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

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Ll

Prof. Wethey
Will T each
Prof. Harold E. Wethey, chairman
of the Fine Arts Department, will
leave for the University of Tucuman
in northern Argentina some time
this month.
In connection with the State De-
partment's program for the develop-
ment of cultural relations between
the Americas, Prof. Wethey will act
as a visiting professor of History of
Art.
During the academic year, which
in South America is from April until
December, Prof. Wethey will offer to
Argentine students two courses; one
on Spanish colonial art in North and
South America, and an introductory
course in the history of art.
Continuous from 1 p m.
STATE
7A NN ABORs NEWT THEATRE..7
Lost Times Today
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ORE * CO0
* VICTO , O OI)AR * RA.
.AMUR* AU ARD
ZOjtNA MA D
POWLL ER~~jA tLAKE*f
SRACKE N * OCESIER
Coming Sunday
'CHET NIKS'
THE FIGHTING
GUERRILLAS

World Student

Lumber Company Turns Wto iwanpower

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Campaign Will Last
From April 15 to 21;
Goal Fixed at $2,000
The World Student Service Fund-
which seeks to help students and
faculty who are victims of war in all
parts of the world-will hold its an-
nual drive on the University campus
from April 15-21.
Barbara Smith, '43, chairman of
the WSSF Committee, said yesterday
that the drive, which will be carried
on principally through the use of
"world banks" placed in the League,
Union and student residences, will
attempt to raise at least $2,000 as
the University's contribution this
year.
Money given in this drive by stu-
dents and faculty members is used
to feed, clothe, supply medical care,
and offer traveling opportunities and
scholarships to students in China,
Russia, the Far East, Canada, unoc-
cupied France, Spain, Greece, Africa,
India. This year the national goal
has been set at $300,000-three times
the amount of last year's aim.
This organization, which is inter-
national, non-sectarian, and non-
political, is the authorized channel
for aid to student prisoners of war
and operates under the Geneva Con-
vention of 1929. All money collected
in this drive is cabled to Geneva,
Switzerland, where it is distributed
by the Eiiopean Student Relief
Fund-one of three organizations al-
lowed to work in prison camps.
Many other nations contribute to
student war relief.
The organizations sponsoring the
WSSF include the United States
Committee of the International Stu-
dent Service, and the United States
section of the World's Student Chris-
tion Federation. Other organizations
cooperating with the group are the
Chinese Student Christian Associa-
tion, the Federation of Jewish Stu-
dent Organizations of New York, the
Institute of International Education,
and the National Student Federation
of America.

Lumbering has been long considered a he-man's industry, but war-
time conditions are causing women to invade the occupation made
famous by Paul Bunyan, the mightiest logger of them all. Because of
the shortage of manpower, the Bay de Noquet Lumber Company of
Nahma, Mich., is resorting to womanpower to operate its sawmill.
(Photo by Clem Tordeur)

V.i, V.Men

(~hAein' Ms-ter
the new I&
PIICHENTONES
are in!
Also our summer lines of
PALM BEACH SUITS and SPORT COATS
INTERWOVEN HOSE ... GARTERS
NECKWEAR ... JEWELRY
Palm Beach trousers, jackets and belts
GIFTS FOR MEN IN SERVICE

I

Get Progratii
For Summer
(Continued from Page 1)
the Daily extra of last Janu;
not been substantially change
will be allowed college train
cording to the following formi
Those who had on Will re
July 1 completed an addi
7 terms 1 ter
6 terms 1 ter
5 terms 2 ter]
4 terms 2 terr
3 terms 3 tern
2 terms 3 tern
1 term 4 tern
V-1 and V-7 reservists at a
now taking regular college co
such fields as liberal arts, agri
and business administration
relatively small group of E
V-12 freshmen will be assigne
stitutions which have been a
for basic training.
The University has been a
as a basic training center and
plans of curricula and use of I
ity facilities are nearing com
The Navy trainees will be ba
in the West Quadrangle be
July 1. More than 1,300 men
stationed here.
Hopwood Entri
Must lBe urne(4
All manuscripts for the H
contest are due Monday in t
wood Room, 3229 Angell H
fore 4:30 p.m.
R. W. Cowden, director
Hopwood awards, hascauti
prospective contestants to f
ize themselves with the rules
ing the contest before they
I their entries.

)AII I OFFICIAL
UntLIETIN
(Cninued Irom Page 2)

Wells To Give
Maim Speedi A
Philosophers' Outlook
On War To. Be Topic
Of Gathering Monday
"A Philosopher Looks at the War"
will be the subject of the nineteenth
annual state conference of the Reli-
gious Education Association opening
on Monday, April 19, in Ann Arbor.
Prof. John Mason Wells, instruc-
tor of religion at Hillsdale College,
will present the principal speech of
the conference. Prof. Ernest J.
Chave, religious educator at the Uni-
versity of Chicago and president of
the Religious Education Association
for the United States and Canada,
will discuss "Religion: Realistic and
Forward Looking" at the special
luncheon to be held at'the Michi-
gan Union.-
Other leaders in the conference in-
clude Prof. Leroy Watermen, chair-
man of the department of Oriental
languages and literatures, Dr. W. P.
Lemon, Father John Quinn, dean of
the University of Detroit, and Dr.
Edward W. Blakeman, counselor in
religious education for the Univer-
sity.
At the afternoon session opening
at 2:15 reports on surveys made of
religion in universities and colleges
of Michigan will be presented, Insti-
tutions which will be represented
include Albion, Kalamazoo, Western
State Teachers, the University of
Michigan, the University of Detroit,
Hillsdale, Marygrove, Alma, Michi-
gan State College, and Michigan
State Normal College.
Seventy-five representatives from
Ann Arbor and other communities
are expected to attend.
Cooper Wins
Speech Con Test
Value of Daytime Rdio
Serials Is Winning Topic
Harold Cooper, '44, won the Speech
32 contest which Was held yesterday
afternoon in Hill Auditorlim.
Cooper's topic Was "What Price
Soap Operas." Hp pointed out that
although the daytime tear-erkin
serials are slightly nauseatiig an
rather ridiculous they still have a
definite value in American life.
Bernard Levine, '44, andargare
Anne Blrown, '45, tied for' second
place in the contest which was
judged by Prof. Arthur Secord, Prof.
Donald Hargis, and Prof. Iugh Nor-
ton, all of the speech departmnt
Other ,finalists were Mary AlicE
Hahn, '45, and George Morley, '45.
HUMANE WEEE NA44 ED
LANSING, April 9. .P)Oovernoi
Kelly today proclained the week
starting Monday as Humane Week
and urged public support of the pro
gram of the Michigan Federation o
Humane Societies in protection of
"children and animals from neglec
and cruelty, and the inculcation t
the minds and hearts of all our peo
t ple of a love of humanitarian prin
ciples."

A

p
Tif

Ne lect of Facts Causes Ignorance
ny, Prai, Crin techj& (igW

"'llOf f0ltrwChniCjttI Ci16 W tile
ignorance of college freshmen in the
field of American history is that of
too much emphasis on social studies
in teaching history and not enough
emphasis on an accurate learning of
the facts," Prof. Verner Crane of the
history department said yesterday.
This explanation was offered in
answer to the New York Times poll
of last week which tested 7,000
freshmen in 36 colleges throughout
the country on their knowledge of
American history. The poll showed
that only 6% could name the orig-
inal 13 states and 80% didn't know
Lincoln was responsible for the
Emancipation Proclamation. Prof.
Crane said he was not surprised in

x ir (, " Cu Ii I ,-, 1 -1 _ t&.- i ta C , . "c -,-': i ti l
1eg4' stdllnt..
"An important contributing fac-
tor," Prof. Crane said, "was the prev-
alent haphazard hiring of history
teachers without stringent require-
ments. This has led to the present
condition in which a large portion
of history teachers have had little or
no preparation to teach history."
Prof. Crane said he did not agree
with the New York Times recom-
mendation to make American his-
tory compulsory for all college stu-
dents. "The situation can be cor-
rected by improving the high school
course," he said, "and a good foun-
dation in American history is needed
for all students, not just those who
continue on to college."

--- -- --

First Methodist Church and Wesley
Foundation: Student Class at 9:30 a.m.
ary has
ed. Men Professor Kenneth Hance of the Speech
ing ac- Department will lead the discussion on
ula: "Viewimg the Results of the Congress' in
Light of the Delaware Conference Report."
tceivna Morning Worship at 10:40 o'clock. Dr.
Charles W. Brashares will preach on "Prel-
in
beginning with supper at 6 o'clock. Pro-
gram at 6:45 p.m. with a presentation
Mssud discussion on "How Much is Caesar's?"
ms .
Ms Memorial Christian Chuwch (Disciples):
10:45-Morning worship, Rev. Frederick
.l1 levels Cowin, Minister.
urses in 7:00 p.m. Guild Sunday Evening Hour.
iculture, iClarence Foster, assisted by a quintet of
plus a musicians, will present a program of Ne-
entering gre lo-ty and spirituals. This will be a
.d to in- joint meitin(,),of Congregational and Dis-
din-oved ciple students at the Congregational
Church. A social hour and refreshments
will follow the meeting.
pproved-
detailed First Presbyterian Church: 10:30 a.m.
Univers- Morning Worship-Dr. W. P. Lemon's sub-
ipletion. ject, "The God We Trust", the fourth of
irracked the Penitential Psalms.
eginning
will be Zion Lutheran Church: Church Service
at 10:30 a.m. Sermon by Rev. Elmer E.
Christiansen, "The Claim Jesus Makes for
'"rinity Lutheran Church: Church Serv-
n ice at. 10:30 am. Sermon by Rev. Henry
0. Yoder, "Man's Plotting Can Never Frus-
{opwood trate God's Purpose."
he Hop-
[all, be- Lutheran Student Association meeting
Sunday at 4:30 p.m. in the Zion Lutheran
of the Parish-Hall, 309 E. Washington St., Pro-
oned all gram arranged by Miss Ruth Berge, grad-
uate student in the School of Music. Sup-
familiar- per follows the program at 6:00 p.m.
govern-
hand in Lutheran Student Chapel: Sunday at
11:00 a.mil Lenten Service in Michigan
League Chapel. Sermon by the Rev. Al,
fred Scheips, "Christ on the Cross."
Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Lutheran Student
Club, Gamma Delta, meets at Rackhan
Building for a hike. Supper at St. Paul's
at 5:30 p.m.

Flattering as can be
.. .wearable with
everythingl (Top)
Also of Blue or Brown
Gabardine. (Below)
Also midway heel.
S\
seen in Vogue and
Mademoiselle

'Pretty Smart" Choice for Easterl

4

ANN ARBOR') S FOREMOST CLOTHIERS
FOR MEN AND BOYS
322-324 South Main Street

.

-

tV
a1L*

Unitarian Church: 11:00 a.m. Service
of Worship, Sermon by Edward H. Red-
man on "Jefferson-Religious Liberal."
8:00 p.m. Liberal Students' Union. Mrs.
Robert Hayden presenting "What Bahais
Believe."
MICHIGAN'

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