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March 18, 1943 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-03-18

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VOX.L LM, No

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1943

PRICE FIVE CENTS

Reds Gain on All
Fronts; Germans
Counterattacking
Russians Rapidly Nearing Smolensk;
Advantageous Position Retaken Near
Kharkov as Germans Mass on Donets
By The Associated Press
LONDON; March 18, Thursday- Russian troops have regained ground
at one point in the savage Donets River battle below Kharkov, captured
dozens more h.amlets in the sweep toward Smolensk, and driven new holes
in Nazi lines near Lake Ilmen, Moscow announced today.
For the first time since the Germans sprang their, great counter-offen-
siVe which retook Kharkov, the Russians told how their troops on this sector
going over to the offensive "captured advantageous positions" near Chugu-
yeV,-22 miles southeast of Kharkov, anid beat off six German counterattacks.
This was the only action mentioned on the long Donets River line
which extends from near Kharkov to a point below Voroshilovgrad, Donets
insln ind'uitrial center. Most of the' .'
Russian troops on this 170-mile
frbnt are fighting defensively on the W ork Or Fight'
uper bank - of the river against
InAssed German tanks and infantry.
ChUguyev, however, is on the lower ill Approved
bank of the river.
The midnight communique, re- By House Group
corded by' the Soviet Monitor here, y r u
said 19. German tanks were knocked
Joit, 90 trucks, and four guns de- Absenteeism Issue
stroyed. and two battalions of ap- D sL
proximately 1,600 men wiped out. iscussed; Lewis
on the central front .Red Army Attacked as 'Tyrant'
vanguards were be1evbd .to.be 40 or
5 miles from the Smolensk strong-
iodThe .commuunique s.,aid -the". SI OMrh 7()
lgd.. r he ad o t~nqe b .si h Work or igt legislation aimed at
Dnieper. Rive' headwaters had been war plant workers who habitually lay
oed agn with the Russians to ob without good cause was
Oling. several enemy strongholds and
capturlig dozenis of populated i- approved, by the House Naval Com-
cs -do
Cos."mittee today,:17 to, 9.
One Soviet unit, killed 500 Ger- 'Elsewhere on Capitol Hill there
mianani captured 10 guns, 60 z.- were these developments bearing on
-ifkeguns and 60 supply - laden the labor situation:
trus, the communu e said. 1. In the .House, Rep. Gossett
. arn.itanks and infantrymen (Den.-Tex.) denounced John L.
wxe counterattacking oil this front Lewis, head of the United Mine
without success, the Russians said. Workers, as "an economic tyrant,"
n.,rsi A -r ld L ic wmild "brhannr

-7

Volunteer Aid
To 'Hospital,
Ir_ answer to'the Manpower's ur-
gent plea for help, ten Chilean engi-
fi ts who are studying at thq Uni-
ersity for their masters under a
Zellogg grant have volunteered their
services to the corps.
'It is the least we can do," Carlos
Plaza, one of the*-students, said yen
terday., "We are vitaily interested
yiAmerica's part in the war, and we
are grateful for the little we can do
* help."
Nicanor Rojas, who is doing gen-
eral work in the Health Service with
Plaza, said, '"America is giving us an
opportunity to finish our education,
and we are simply trying to express
Vui thanks."
Three of the engineers are work-
ing as orderlies in the hospital. They
are Ernesto Gomez, Raul Cirda and
Carlos. Rodriquez. Jorge Cerda is
working in the West Quad.
The other students, Raul Vignola,
Jose MacCourtney, Luis Albarez and
Juan Dittillo, are doing general work
in the Rackham Building. All ten
students average sixteen hours' work
a week.
Each of the men has also donated
to the Red Cross 'Blood Bank. "Oh,
but that is nothing!" Plaza said.
TinCan Pickup
Will.Be today
City Trucks To Aid in
Victory Salvage Drive
Tin Can Alley might be the refrain
for the day. Warren Watts, chairman
of the C.V.D.O. of the Manpower
Corps, announced yesterday that all
fraternities and sororities and other
campus houses should pile their
ready tin cans on the curb so they
may be picked up sometime today by
City trucks.
The campus contribution is being
collected to add to the Washtenaw
County quota of 200 car loads of cans
per month in an all-out "salvage for
victry" drive.
The paper labels and ends should
be remnoved from the cans, and they
should be washed and flattened to
prepare them for their journey in a
City truck on their first trip of the

un (eciarea Lews wui -ecome
the Benedict Arnold of 1943'' if coal
miners quit work April 1. Lewis, ne-
gotiating:in New York 'for a $2 a day
wage increase, for mmiers, has de-
clared they will not work unless they
ge a new contract by. April 1.
2.:William Green, AFL president,
engaged in a sharp clash with Sena-
tor Holman (Rep.-Ore.) before the
Sehate Military Committee, with the
Sendtor describing as "balderdash"
the labor leader's arguments against
legislation' permitting drafting of
men i or women, when necessary, for
farm and factory work. Green shot
back that Holman's remarks showed
his attitude toward organized labor.
.3. The House Labor Committee,
opening hearings on absenteeism,
heard Harold J. Gibson, AFL repre-
sentative of Pacific Coast aircraft
workers, contend "dissatisfaction
with pay scales" is the principal rea-
son for workers laying off the job.
He' argued many workers would pre-
fer a military status and military
pay in the aircraft industry, saying
this would give them larger income
than they now receive.
* * *
WHY ABSENTEEISM?
Absenteeism I
Serious, Says I
By JANE FARRANT
"Absenteeism, the failure of a
worker to appear at the job he is
scheduled to do, is a matter of grow-
ing concern in war production indus-
tries," Prof. J. W. Riegel, Director of
the Bureau of Industrial Relations,
said yesterday.
"Rates of absenteeism have mark-
edly increased in the past eighteen
months," Prof. Riegel stated. "Late
in January, 1943, the absence rate in
45 Midwestern war plants was said
to range from three to more than six
per cent."
"Even an absence rate of six per
cent understates the problem," added
Prof. Riegel, "since absenteeism of
that proportion can reduce produc-
tion to a much greater degree when
the absentees are specialists and their
absences destroy the effectiveness of
working groups. Furthermore, where
operations are closely scheduled, ab-
sences which cause a decline in pro-
duction in one department may en-
force idleness on the part of workers
in other departments.
The absence rate is in general high-
IFC Council Presidency
Nntminatian. 1Du-s Jv.irlq a

Allied Planes West Quad British
Assault Jap Will House
Pacific Bases ROTC Men On Mari
Gen. MacArthur's Men LatoAdnedCrs 111
Mop Up Enemy Nearorp
Mabae ivr ouh Left CampusI Today A lie U
For Reception Centers
By The Associated Press
ALLIED HEADQUARTERS IN Allen Rumsey House of the West
AUSTRALIA, March 18. (Thursday) Quadrangle is now being prepared to Army Bom bers
-Allied airmen striking at the en-h-c
,emy's invasion bases over a broad house the Advanced Corps of the
front blasted Rabaul in New Britain ROTC when they return to campus, Attack Kiska
with 392 bombs and sowed destruc- Captain Roland Kolb of the ROTC
tion in the Kai Islands Wednesday, announced yesterday. In H eavy
while ground troops discovered an- The second group of the advanced
other elaborate sign of Japanese of- comheftoday fo rect
fensive plans, a communique said center to be processed and inducted Dawn-to-Dusk Action
today. , . into the regular army. The first group In Aleutians Is Heaviest
General MacArthurs New Gunea left yesterday. .nAetin sHevetb
ground forces mopping up the Main- e ras ince June Occupation t
bare River" mouth 50 miles above The 114 room Allen Ruisey House SneJieOcpto
conquered Buna "have come upon will be converted into regular military t
an elaborate and recently construct- barracks, and the ROTC men will WASHINGTON, March 17.-(/P)- i
ed enemy defense system, including live under strict military discipline. The accumlated fury of months of A
prepared positions, pillboxes, a hos- Their hours will be regulated as preparation by the United States Air
pital and other installations for a are those of other military detach- Command in the North Pacific burst
large force," the communique said. ments on campus. They will study over the Japanese base at Kiska Mon-
"Signs of recent hasty evacuation as a group under supervision, day, the Navy disclosed today, when
indicate a decisive blow dealt the There are 168 men in the advanced heavy and medium Army bombers
enemy on the north front by de- company and after their current pro- raided the Aleutian Islands six times
struction of the convoy in the Bis- cessing it is expected the seniors will by daylight. I
marck Sea battle," the bulletin added, return to campus with the rank of This was the greatest number of at-
"these positions having no doubt been sergeant while the rest of the men tacks delivered against Kiska in a
constructed in preparation for their will bear the rank of corporal. single dawn-to-dusk period since
coming for a probable future intend- Because the men will be permitted enemy forces occupied it last June,
ed offensive." to resume their current studies, they and indications were that the number
The Japanese were estimated to will not march to classes in military and weight of bombs dropped were
have lost 15,000 troops when the 22- fashion, Captain Kolb said. They will, considerable. A Navy communique
ship convoy bearing them in the Bis- however, drill as a group and take described the actions as "six heavy
marck Sea was sunk recently. their physical instruction as a unit. bombing attacks."
Prof. Marvin Niehuss, director of The communique also reported in-
emergency training on campus, tensified offensive actions at the b
Eddy Concert pointed out that the Allen Rumsey southern end of the long Pacific bat-
arrangement is only temporary till tlefront. On Monday night (Solo- w
June. The entire West Quadrangle is mons time) a light Naval surfacet
BestAttendbeing reserved for the Navy for their force-probably a cruiser-destroyerq
V-12 program slated to begin here task group-penetrated into enemy- A
July 1. Solomon Islands and bombed the port
Under the present Army plan the village of Vila with "good results,"
ROTC men will only remain in the Navy said. C
Nelson Expresses His school through the current semester. (
Desire To Be Back in At that time the seniors will be Laz
D r o kordered directly to Service School and Against
School After 'M' Visit the juniors will be sent to basic
training centers preparatory to being Jews Lifted r
By AL RAYMOND sent to Service School.
Besieged by autograph hunters, *
Nelson Eddy hurried from Hill Audi- Giraud Repeals Vichy
torium last night to rush to Pennsyl- fstqi-4iiAriI I
vania, and then New York, on the Force To Be Under Ganoe Retitions InI
next leg of his extended tour of '
America. Pausing long enough to talk Col. William A. Ganoe, ROTC ALGIERS, March
about Michigan, Eddy expressed a commandant, will be commander- Henri Giraud issued decrees tonight
wish to be back at school again. in-chief of all Army training units formally lifting Vichy restrictions
Smiling as he signed program after on campus except the Air Corps me-
progam, ddyremakedovertheteorology detachment, the Sixth against approximately 30,000 Jews
program, Eddy remarked over the Service Command announced yes- and restoring elective municipal as-0
pleasing and appreciative audienceterday semblies in a North African house--
in Ann Arbor, and declared it one of The ROTC unit, the language cleaning expected to resultin a uniont
the best in America. group, and the Army engineers between Giraud and the Fi1hting
Discussing his country-wide tour, scheduled to arrive here March 29 French Leader Gen. Charles De0
Eddy smiled as he spoke of the huge will be under his command. Gaulle.
audiences wherever he went. He had In conjunction with this an- (The Fighting French group in
thought, he said, "audiences would nouncement, Captain Roland Kolb London announced today that the
be smaller this year due to war bond of the ROTC revealed the organiza- two generals would meet soon in
campaigns, and higher income taxes, tional set-up that will'be instituted North Africa).
but I was surprised and pleased at on campus. As a result of "suggestions" postage
the unusual showing throughout the The ROTC men combined with stamps bearing Marshal Petain's like-
nation. More and better audiences the language group which has been ness also were being withdrawn and
seem to be attending the concerts studying here since December will pictures of the aged Vichy Chief of
this year." form the first battalion under Cap- State who brought about the French-
Besieged by women principally, tain Kolb's direction. German Armistice were being taken
Eddy signed autographs by the hand- Captain Leonard Peterson, now on down from public buildings.
fuls as he huried to catch a train out the administrative staff of the * *
of Ann Arbor. ROTC, will be placed in charge of
the engineers when they arrive. This DeGaulle, Giraud Will 1
unit will comprise the second bat- Meet for Conference0
talion. The meteorology studentsf
will remain under the command of LONDON, March 17.-(A)-The 1
s Becom inclr Captain Cullen Coil who came here breach between Gen. Charles De1
SB with the group. Gualle and Gen. Henri Giraud ap-
pearedto be closed tonight, and thev
Prof. J. Riegel two supreme commanders of Frencht
Senate Defers resistance to Germany were expectedc
er for women than for men, and for to confer shortly in Algiers on af
young men as compared to older men, F ~union pooling a potential army ofe
while on the whole absenteeism seemsFarm W orkers nearly 400,000 men and almost theI
to be concentrated among a minority entire resources of the French em-

of workers in each plant, according Vote Overrides War
to Prof. Riegel. Department, 50 to 24
"A number of recent studies of GOOD NEIGHBOR:
absenteeism in this country and in WASHINGTON, March 17.- W)-
England indicate that the following Moved to militant action by reports
causes are common," continued Prof. of imminent food shortages, the T. R. Ybarra 0
Riegel. Senate overrode War Department
The causes were listed by Prof protests today to pass, 50 to 24, aTton
Riegel as illness, lack of interest, job bill denying any more agricultural
shopping, household duties of women workers to the armed forces.
employees, the seven-day week, night The measure, which now goes to "Latin-America Tomorrow will be
work, inadequate housing and trans- the House, would direct draft boards discussed by T. R. Ybarra at 8:15
portation, the draft, ease of getting to defer all men employed substan- p.m. tonight in Hill Auditorium in
Turn to Page 2, Col. 5 tially full time in production of es- the season's last Oratorical Associa-
sential foods and fibres. It would tion lecture.
replace the so-called Tydings Am- Ybarra is best known as the author
S vcendment to the present law in which of the best-seller, "Young Man of
Ap on Sunda/Er y.' deferments are authorized but not Caracas," the story of his youth,
made mandatory, under a unit sys- spent partly in Venezuela's capital
tem which requires minimum stan- and partly in Boston.
It'll be "Strictly uG when the dards of production of essential This country should make every
eight page tabloid supplement makes crops. possible effort to maintain its influ-
its bow Sunday to a changed campus ence south of the Rio Grande, he be-
of uniforms and women. lieves, and provide the Latin-Ameri-
Designed to interest the khaki- Catholic Primateof cans with necessary markets.
clad men and the boys in blue, The Ybarra, whose father was a Vene-
Daily's newest addition will feature Great Britain Dies zuelan general, Cabinet Minister, and
pictures, cartoons, news stories, governor of six of that country's
sports yarns, and "humorful" squibs. LONDON, March 17. -(R)- The states, feels that most South Ameri-

Launch Assault
Eth Line; Major
ffensive Started
Rommel's Positions in Southeastern
Tuniisia Menaced by Tanik, Infantry
Attacks, German Radio Announces
By EDWARD D. BALL
Associated Press Correspondent
LONDON, March 17.- An assault which appears to be "a major attack"
y the British Eighth Army against Marshal Rommel's Mareth Line posi-
ions in southeastern Tunisia is under way, the German radio announced
oday while field dispatches reported that the Allied forces were getting set
[n the Tunisian North for the final coordinated blow to drive the Axis from
kfrica.

The Berlin radio, quoting militar
USO Council
Designates 3
USO Centers
YMCA To Be Clearing
Agency; Hillel, K of C
Building Are Centers
The YWCA, Knights of Columbus
building and the Hillel Foundation
were designated as official USO cen-
ers and the YMCA as USO head-
quarters at a meeting of the Ann
ArborUSO Council last night. '-
The YMCA will act as a clearing
agency for all USO activities, Mr.
Osias Zwerdling, president of the
Council, said, while the other organi-
zations will cooperate as official ac-
tivities centers.
The Council also approved the
recommendation of the planning
committee, under the chairmanship
of Rabbi Jehudah M. Cohen, to ap-
point' a committee of three- women,
'epresenting the National Council of
Catholic Women, the Jewish Welfare
Board, and the YWCA to have full
authority over all USO activities in-
volving women.
More than 450 service men were
served by the USO during the month
of February with various activities
including dormitory accommoda-
tions at the YMCA and K. of C.
buildings, councilling, dancing and
other recreational facilities.
Senate Raises
Navy Budget,
Knox Reports Warship
Production Going Well
WASHINGTON, March 17.-(P)-
The Senate passed two bills today
adding $5,557,000,000 in appropria-
tions and contract authorizations to
operate, repair and maintain a Navy
for which $64,000,000,000 had already
been spent or authorized since July
1, 1940.
Before acting on the two measures
without roll call votes and returning
them to the House for action on
changes, the Senate received a report
from its appropriations committee
disclosing testimony by Secretary
Knox that production of every type
of warship except escort ships is
ahead of schedule.

y circles, said four British tank and
infantry divisions were being used
in the assault on the Mareth Line.
Available reports, the broadcast
said, were that the British first line
was formed by the 51st British Divi-
sion with three infantry and one
tank brigade, and the 7th British
Tank Division. The second wave
was composed, it said, of the 50th
British Division, and the second New
Zealand 'Division, which together
consist of four infantry and two
tank brigades.
The Fifth British Division is being
held in reserve, the radio declared,
and other British forces were being
reinforced for possible assaults on
the German flanks along with the
frontal attack.
In another broadcast, the German
International Information Bureau,. a
propaganda agency, said British ar-
tillery had "effectively shelled the
advance field positions of the Ge*-
man-Italian Tank Army," but that
Axis forces had been "able to hold
their advanced line in heavy batUes
which inflictedlosses on the enemy."
Many reports of intensified A1lid
preparations for a North African
offensive, which must be successful
before a second front can be opened
in Europe, were met with official
silence in London., There were un-
official suggestions that the big push
was imminent.
U Men Collect
For Red Cross
Manpower Corps Will
Man 3 Booths Today
Under the direction of the Man-
power Corps, booths will be set up in
the Engineer Arch, Angell Hall and
the lobby of the Union from in a. dm.
to noon and from 1 to 3 p.m. In order
to receive contribution for the cur-
rent Red Cross Membership drive.
The men' of the University have
now collected $920 in their campaign
for $1,000 which is scheduled. A
booth will be set up from 3 to 6 p.m.
until the end of the drive by the com-
mittee working from the Union.
With a quota of $53,000, Washte-
naw County contributions have now
climbed to $49,462.09., The total
amount turned in from Ann Arbor is
$31,462.09, while out-county contri-
butions stand at $18,000.

Vill Lecture
tin America
> 1 0

'Splendid' Student
Response To Help
Shortage Praised''
Six more men registered with the
Manpower Corps yesterday to give
some of their time as orderlies and
porters at the Hospital and Health
Service.
One of these is employed at the
Health Service which now is com-
pletely staffed with workers except
for a few hours per week. The Hospit-
al still needs more men, and any stu-
dents who can should register
through Manpower and then be in-
terviewed -by Miss Katherine Walsh,
volunteer director at the Hospital.
Both institutions were "completely
grateful" for the Manpower Corps'
interest in their plight and in the
students' "splendid" response, per-
sonnel directors said yesterday.
Local Transport
Vehicles Frozen
WASHINGTON, March 17.-(A')-
The government "froze" local trans-
portation vehicles to their present

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