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January 23, 1943 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-01-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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7

EY'RE IN THE ARMY NOW

. ..,.

....

Iifmapower Demend Reduce
iNuber of College Faculty Mii

Wartime demand for trained man-
power has cut the number of college-
faculty men by seven-and-a-half per
cent in American colleges and uni-
versities, an Office of Education Sur-
vey reported this week.
Armed forces and government and
war industry jobs absorbed most of
8,000 men teachers who resigned their
jobs, between 1941-42 the survey indi-
cated. An increase- of 1.3 per cent in
women teachers was found.
Data collected from about half of
the country's institutions of higher
learning showed a number of signifi-
cant changes dues to the pinching of
the supply of faculty men.
Instructors who have remained at
their posts are working much longer
hours, the survey disclosed. Certain
courses have been entirely discon-
tinued, and 172 colleges reported re-
tention of staff members beyond the
'43 IHopwood
Entries Drop
Forty-five students submitted 50
manuscripts in the annual Freshman
Hopwood Contest, Prof. Roy W. Cow-
den, director of the Hopwood Room,
announced yesterday.
Compared to the 1942 total, there
were 14 fewer contestants and 17
fewer manuscripts. Seventeen stu-
dents are competing for the cash
awards in prose fiction, while there
were 23 last year. Twenty essays have
been submitted, compared to 13 last
year; the poetry entries have re-
mained the same at 13.
Judges for the contest are Prof.
Arno L. Bader and Prof. Louis I.
Bredvold of the English department,
College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts, and Dr. Frank E. Robbins,
director of the University of Michigan
Press.
Winners of the $50, $30, and $20
awards will be announced early in the
spring term.

usual retirement age. Some even are
calling retired professors back into
classrooms.
The increased burden on their fa-
cilities has caused some colleges to
put a stop to independent reasearch
-and other non-teaching activities-
usually carried on by faculty mem-
bers.
Men Students
Will Register
for Manpower
(Continued from Page 1)
ing semester, Dorman said, and will
be able to plan their own working
hour schedules with the restaurants.
There is still room for more who wish
to do this kind of work, he said.
Still on the tentative list, but of-
fering great potential possibilities, is
a project being planned by Mr. Ed-
ward C. Pardon, superintendent of
the Buildings and Grounds depart-
ment, in co-operation withManpower
Corps. It calls for the establishment
of a factory to turn out vital war
parts here on campus. If carried
through, Michigan would be the first
university in the country to make
such a concrete addition to the war
effort. Workers in the plant, accord-
ing to publicity agent Cole, would
require little or no experience.
While announcing the projects
scheduled for next semester, Cole also
reported on the activities of the Man-
power Corps during the first three
months of existence. Among its ac-
complishments since it was set up in
October are the' carrying out of the
largest college scrap drive in the
country, formation of the Midwest
Student War Council, sponsoring of
the 42 Finale, aiding in the sugar
beet harvest, and the removal of two
huge boilers for the Navy, Cole indi-
cated.

Ruthven Will
Serve wlIf U]
Boa vd to Plan Arm-1,-y
Religious Program
President Alexander G. Ruthven
has been elected to serve as a mem-
ber of the advisory committee of thej
Inter-Religion Council with nine
other university presidents, it was an-
nounced yesterday.
This Council, organized on a na-
tion-wide scale, will have as its aim
the creation of a minimum program
for draftees soon to enter colleges
and universities. It also will attempt
to provide a common group repre-
senting Jews, Catholics, and Protes-
tants.
The central executive responsibility
of the Council will be carried by Dr.
George Johnson, Catholic educator,
Dr. Abram Sachar, Jewish educator,
and Roland S. Elliott, International
Christian Association secretary for
students.
Presidents from Yale, North Caro-
lina, Texas, and California will also
serve on the advisory committee. The
group will confer with military au-
thorities in an attempt to provide a
religious program for soldiers who
will be sent to some 250 colleges on
Feb. 1.
Lfocal Plant
to Get Award
Ann Arbor's American Broach and
Machine Co. will receive a Bull's Eye
flag for exemplary employe purchase
of war bonds, the State War Savings
Committee announced yesterday.
Reardon Peirson, deputy adminis-
trator of the Committee, ,telegraphed
congratulations to the 98-and-a-half
per cent of Broach workers who have
subscribed to regular bond purchases.
Peirson said that 12.2 per cent of
the company's payroll now is diverted
for bond buying. American Broach
was awarded a Minute Man flag last
July for more than 90 per cent par-
ticipation in the salary savings plan.

*e - ei* oimo nnA-
Cdr's MYenoriai Cbristian Church,
who is hailed as one of America's 32
outstanding ministers, will retire this
month after 42 years in the pulpit, he
announced yesterday.
Rev. Cowin, famous as a lecturer
on Robert Burns, has been preacher
of the Memorial Church at Hill St.
and Tappan Avenue for the last 16
years.
He will continue to reside in Ann
Arbor as a lecturer and a substitute
preacher.
It was Dr. Edgar DeWitt Jones of
Detroit who included British-born
Rev. Cowin in his book of 32 "Ameri-
can Preachers Today."
University Pres. Alexander Ruthven
called the Memorial Church a "power
for good and a stabilizing influence
under the able direction of the Rev.
Cowin. I have not known an Ann Ar-

czr cit~en mnore respccted bth cn
and off the capus
Rev cowin, ioni on the Isle of
IVin, began is preaching n Qiasgow
after graduating from the College of
the Disciples in Birmingham, Eng-
land. He has preached in Africa and
Canada.
Today's Graduates
Order your Subscription
for the
Michigan Alumnus
NOW
$2.00 for 1 year

Carrier Cowpens Launched

Rev. Cowin Will Retire Soon

1

ROTH
STRING QUARTET

The Cowpens, fourth aircraft carrier launched in 20 weeks
at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation Yards at Camden, N.J.,
slides down the ways. Named for the Battle of Cowpens in the

FOUR DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS
IN THREE PROGRAMS
FERI ROTH, Violin JULIUS SHAIER, Viola
SAMUEL SIEGEL, Violin OLIVER EDEL, 'Cello
THIRD ANNUAL CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
LECTURE HALL--RACKHAM BUILDING
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JAN. 22-23

Revolutionary War, the ship was
sary of the battle.

launched on the 162nd anniver,

Women's League
to Meet Wednesday
The annual January conference of
the Ann Arbor braich of the League
of Women Voters will be held at 12:15
p.m., Wed., Jan. 27 at the League.
Mrs. Olive Haskins of Flint who is
vice-president of the L.W.V.will speak
on the "Role of the League of Women
Voters in Wartime." Dr. Helmut G.
Callis, lecturer in the economics de-
partment and consultant to the Of-
fice of Strategic Services in Washing-
ton, will speak at 3 p.m. on "Organi-
zation for Peace-Past and Future."
Men are especially invited to hear Dr.
Callis.
Luncheon reservations must be,
phoned to Mrs. William Preston at+
2-2438 by Monday afternoon, Jan, 25.

Auvikah to Sponsor
Three-Day S eminar
on Zionism, Feb 5-7
A three-day educational seminar
on "The Avukah Approach to Zion-
ism" will be held by Avukah, student
Zionist organization, Feb. 5-7, the
week end of registration.
The program of meetings is as fol-
lows: Feb. 5, 2:30 p.m., History of
Zionism; Feb. 6, 9:30 a.m,, The Avu-
kah-Z.O.A. Conflict; .2:30 p.m., The
Avukah Program; Feb. 7, 9:30 a.m.,
Palestine Today, and 3 p.m., The
Future of World Jewry.
Speakers at the meetings will in-.
clude Bill Schumer, '44, retiring presi-
dent, Isadore Singer, '45, and Max
Dresden of the physics department.
All meetings except the second are
open to the public as well as to mem-

Saturday,
Quartet
Quartet
Quartet
Saturday
Quarteti
Quarteti
Quartet

Afternoon at 2:30:
in D major, No. 2 .. ...........Borodin
No. 4...... .......... .Quincy Porter
In B-flat major....................Mozart
Evening at 8:30:
In F major, Op. 18, No. 1........Beethoven
in C major, Op. 49 .........Shostakovich
in F major. ........... ........Dvorak

PROGRAMS
Friday Evening at 8:30:
Quartet in D major, Op. 76, No. 5H.........aydn
uartet in D-fiat major, No. 2...........Dohnanyi
Quartet in F minor, Op. 95 .............. Beethoven

COME TO

r'
Season tickets tax ncl. (three concerts) $1.10-$2.20-$2.75
Single concerts, tax included, 55c-$1.10
On sale at Offices of University Musical Society,
Burton Memorial Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan

bers.

I'_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

-L

State and William Streets
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr, D.D.
Director of Music: Arnold Blackburn.
Director of Congregational and Disciples
Guilds: Rev. H. L. Pickerill.
Church School Departments: 9:30 A.M. and
10:30 A.M.,
Service of Public Worship: 10:45 A.M. Subject
of sermon by Dr. Parr: "A Door! A Door!"
Ariston League of the Pilgrim Fellowship meets
at 5:30 P.M. A. A. James will speak on
"Building a Body Fit to Live In"-with mo-
tion pictures of The Olympic Games.
At 7:00 the Student Fellowship will meet in-
formally at the Disciples Guild Houseon
Maynard St.

1

ST ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
Church: 306 N. Division St.
Student Center-State and Huron Streets.
The Rev. Henry Lewis, D.D., Rector
The Rev. John G. Dahl, Curate
George Faxon, Organist and Choirmaster.
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer and Sermon by Dr.
Lewis.
11:00 A.M.: Junior Church.
5:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and Address by Mr.
Dahl.
6:00 P.M. H-Square Club, Page Hall.
FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
(at Harris Hall)
7:30-10:00 P.M. Open House, Harris Hall.
Tea - Tuesday and Friday, 4:00 P.M.
Evening Prayer - Tuesday, 5:15 P.M., Har-
ris Hall Chapel.
Holy Communion and Breakfast - Wednes-
day and Thursday, 7:30 A.M., Chapel.
Intercessions for Peace - Friday, 12:10 noon,
Chapel. ..

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 South Division St.
Wednesday evening service at 8
Sunday morning service at 10:30.
Subject: "Truth."
Sunday School at 11:45.
Free public Reading Room at 106 E. Washington
St., open every day except Sundays and holi-
days from 11:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Saturdays
until 9 P.M..
BETHLEHEM CHURCH
(Evangelical and Reformed)
423 South Fourth Avenue.
Rev. Theodore Schmale, Pastor.
9 30 A.M. Church School- with classes for every
age group.
10:30 A.M. Morning Worship.
Sermon topic: "Compassion for Souls."
6:00 P.M. Student Guild Supper and discussion
hour.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State St.
Ministers: Charles W. Brashares and Ralph G.
Dunlop.
Music: Hardin Van Deursen, director.
Mary McCall Stubbins, organist.
10:40 A.M. Church School for Nursery, Begin-
ners and Primary Departments where young
children may be left during worship service.
10:40 A.M. Worship Service. Dr. Brashares' ser-
mon subject is "Blueprints of a New World".
This is the fifth of a series on "Men of the
Spirit thru Twenty Centuries of Church His-
tory". It is based on Saint Augustine's City
of God.
6:00 P.M. Wesleyan Guild Meeting for Univer-
sity students. In the series on "Religions of
the World", the subject "Judaism" will be
presented by Rabbi Jehudah Cohen. Fellow-
ship hour and supper follow.
7:00 P.M. Newlyweds Discussion Group meets
in Parlors.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Sponsored jointly by the Zion and Trinity
Lutheran Churches.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
E. Washington and S. Fifth Ave.
10:30 A.M. Church Worship Service.
Sermon: "Jesus, The Helper of The Helpless,"
by Rev. Elmer Christiansen.
TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH
E. William St. and S., Fifth Ave.
.10:30 A.M. Church Worship Service.
Sermon: "Responsibility Matches Possibility,"
by Rev. H. 0. Yoder.
LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSN., Zion Lutheran
Parish Hall, 309 E. Washington.
5:30 P.M. Social and fellowship hour.
6:00 P.M. Supper with program following.
Worship Service, Miss Joyce Haglund, leader.

I'

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IP-

L'ell 4/ 4'ou,'

- FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Washtenaw Avenue -
Ministers: William P. Lemon, D.D.,
Willard V. Lampe
Mark W. Bills, Director of Music
Franklin Mitchell, Organist
9:30 A.M. Church School will meet in all de-
partments. Classes for all ages. University
Student Bible Class.
10:45 A.M. Morning Worship.
"The Ways of God to Man." Sermon by Dr.
Lemon.
10:45 A.M. Nursery is conducted during the hour
of Morning Worship with Miss Lois Giles in
charge.
4:30 P.M. Vesper Communion Service. Recep-
tion .of new members.
6,00 P.M. Tuxis Society will have Roger Well-
ington for the devotional leader. Reports
finishing "The Rim of th Caribbean" will be
given by Lisbeth Hildebrandt, Alice Boughton
and Bob Brackett.
6:00 P.M. Westminster Student Guild will have
a supper meeting following the Communion
Service. There will be a service of prayer,
song and poetry.

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