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January 20, 1943 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1943-01-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

44

-
, . .. . . . :. . .I.- ,1 .ice .lei i .. ;:

OL' MAN WINTER BLITZES CITY:
Fifteen Inches of Snow Block'
eets in Record Fl res

Ann Arbor's whistling January
snow blizzards have broken a Weather
Bureau record, pr'esented Buildings
and Grounds Supt. Edward C. Pardon
with a major headache, and paradox-
ically reduced the city's automobile
New under-arm ft
Cream Deodorant
safely
Stops Perspiration
ARRiD r
1. Does not rot dresses or meV's
shirts. Does not irritate skin.
2. No waiting to dry. Can be used
right after shaving.
3. Instantly stops perspiration for
1 to 3 days. Prevents odor.
4. A pure, white, greaseless,
.sailes vanishing cream.
American Institute of Launder-
igfor being harmless to
3ta jar
nato eA also in 10¢ and s9f jars
Good Housekeeping
% P l iA6l R

accident rate, wind-whipped students
were finding yesterday.
Tuesday morning's snowfall helped
to pile an even 15" of powdery snow
on the ground, the Weather Bureau's
cooperative station at the Observa-
tory reported as of 7 a.m. yesterday,
a record to as far back as 1910 where
present files begin.
20.1" of snow that has fallen since.
January 1 has all the earmarks of
another record according to Miss
Mary E. Lindsey, Bureau statistician.
"Heavy snowfall may suddenly cease,"
Miss Lindsey said, "but the volume
so far is certainly a record for this
time of year."
Buildings and Grounds crewmen
have worked furiously to clear student
pathways on campus, the office re-
ported, but a scarcity of labor makes
the work slow.
The department has concentrated
first on essential locations such as
the Hospital with their sweeper-
trucks before turning to campus side-
walks.

British Eighth
Continues Push
n urTripoli
(Contiri ed from Page 1)
Itali ns out of the Sahara and cap-
turi g Gat, Serdeles and Ubari.)
Among front line troops leading
the cleanup- of the last shred of Mus-
solini's "Roman Empire" were the
British armored units, artillery and
infantry and New Zealand infantry.
Most clashes of the advancing
army were notwith Italian defenders
of the empire but with the Germans.
Rommel already had sent most of
the Italian elements on ahead.
It was considered likely that he
would leave a large part of the Italian
civil population behind. This was
considerable for at the start of the
war 35,000 Italians were living in
Tripoli and many more were in agri-
cultural colonies. Some of these have
left for Italy but other Italians have
come from Cirenaica ahead of the
British.
Rommel, it was thought, will leave
most of these to confront the British
with a new feeding problem.

Ii
l
1
.]
7
1
1

Highligghh'
On Campus
Third and last day of the Fourth
Annual Michigan Pastors' Conference
will be highlighted by the lectures of
Lieut.-Col. Thomas W. Carter, chap-
lain at St. Louis, Mo., and Prof. Nels
F. S. Ferre of Andover-Newton Sem-
inary.
Colonel Carter, who is stationed at
the District Chaplain Headquarters,
St. Louis, will speak on "The Ameri-
can Soldier and the Army Chaplain"
at 10 a.m. today in the Rackham
Building.
. .
Technic Banquet
Prof. Hugh E. Keeler, of the
Mechanical engineering department
will address the annual Technic
staff banquet tomorrow at the Un-
ion when the new editors for next
semester will be appointed.
sem e * api *
Organ Soloist
The University music school will
present E. Power Biggs, who is con-
sidered to be one of the country's
fading organists, as guest soloist on
the weekly organ program at 4:15
p.m. today in Hill Auditorium.
Among the selections which Biggs
will present is the "Concerto No. 2
in B flat" of Handel, a prelude and
toccata of Bach, and an air with vari-
ations by Haydn.

Smithies to Go
to Washington
P~f, WiljardI§
Called to Lasi Vegas,
Most recent faculty member to be
added to the ranks in Washington is;
Prof. Arthur Smithies of the econom-
ics department, who will leave the
University at the close of the semes-
ter to work in the Bureau of the Bud-
get on inflationary problems.
The official title of his position is
Principal Fiscal Analyst, but Prof.
Smithies said yesterday, "I might be
just a glorified office boy."
Prof. Smithies, who is originally
from Australia, worked for the OPA
last summer as an analyst and au-
thority on Australian industries. He
will continue to work in an advisory
capacity forthe OPA.
Prof. Herbert H. Willard, University
magnesium expert, is leaving Ann
Arbor tomorrow bound for the world's
largest magnesium plant in Las Ve-
gas, Nevada, on a government assign-
ment, the Chemistry Department re-
vealed today.
Although the exact details of Prof.
Willard's mission are not known, he
announced that he expects to return
to the University by the beginning of
the new semester in February.
The men's personnel committee
of the Intercooperative Council
will hold interviews at 7:30 today
in the Union for men interested in
living in a Cooperative house next
semester.

Anew shrll-tned air raid siren
has become a temporary Impossibility
for Ann Arbor due to a War Produc-
tion Board ruling, Mayor .leigh 4
Young told the city council last night.
The city's priority application for
a Chrysler-Bell siren was refused by
the WPB with the statement that for
the time being at least these sirens
mill

City Denied Air Raid Siren

7111 be reseryed for use in iarger n-
dustrial comm unit e-
in the letter to the mayor refusing
the application, the board said, "You
probably know that the Victory siren
is capable of adequately covering ap-
proximately a nine square mile area.
Therefore, the comparatively few re-
maining should not be utilized in any
community *vhich does not exceed six
square miles."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 2)
The 10 o'clock section will meet as
usual.
Students in the Tuesda3 quiz sec-
tion will attend either one of the sec-
tions above. -John F. Shepard

h

I

History 11, Final examination of
lecture group 2 of History 11: Discus-
sion sections of De Vries, Monks and
Slosson in C Haven Hall; discussion
sections of Long, Meier and Scholes,
including those formerly taken by
Hansen, in Natural Science Auditor-
ium, Friday, Jan. 29, 2-4 p.m.
P. W. Slosson
English I and II Final Examination
Schedule for Monday, Jan. 25, 2-4
p.m.
English I: Bertram, W Phys Lect;
Boys, W Phys Lect; Bredvold, C Ha-
ven; Calver, 2003 AH; Cooley, 2203
AH; Davis, G Haven; Eisinger, G Ha-
ven; Engel, C Haven; Faust, 205 MH;
Fletcher, 2225 AH; Fogle, 3017 AH;
Greenhut, 2235 AH; Haugh, 2219 AH;
Hawkins, 2215 AH; Helm, C Haven;
Helmers, 225 AH; McClennen, 229
AH; Means, 2029 AH; Schenk, 205
MH; Taylor, E Haven; Thein, 1035
AH; Traver, 2203 AH; Walker, 35
AH; Walsh, 3209 AH; Warner, D Ha-
ven; Wells, D Haven.
English II: Everett, 3231 AH; Nel-
son, B Haven; Ogden, 18 AH; Ohlsen,
1020 AH; Schroeder, B Haven;
Thorpe, 1018 AH.
Doctoral Examination for Chad
Walsh, English Language & Litera-
ture; thesis: "The Preposition at the
End of a Clause in Early Middle Eng-
lish," will be held today in West
Council Room, Rackham, at 2:30 p.m.
Chairman, C. C. Fries.
By action of the Executive Board,
the Chairman may invite members of
the faculties and advanced doctoral
candidates to attend the examination
and he may grant permission to those
who for sufficient reason might wish
to be present. -C. S. Yoakum
Doctoral Examination for Frank
Cavan Fowler, Chemical Engineering;
thesis: "Mixing of Fluids by Succes-
sive Flow through Pipes," will be held
today in 3201 East Engineering, at
1:30 p.m. Chairman, G. G. Brown.
By action of the Executive Board,
the Chairman may invite members of
the faculties and advanced doctoral
candidates to attend the examination
and he may grant permission td those
who for sufficient reason might wish
to be present. -C. S. Yoakum
Concerts
Chamber Music Festival: The Roth
String Quartet: Feri Roth and Sam-
uel Siegel, violin; Julius Shaier, viola;
and Oliver Edel, Violoncello; will give

a series of three concerts in the Rack-
ham Auditorium on January 22 and
23, as follows :
Friday at 8:30: Quartet in D by
Haydn; Quartet in D-flat by Dohnan-
yi; and Beethoven's Quartet in F ni-
nor.
Saturday at 2:30: Quartet in D by
Borodin; Quartet No. 4 by Quincy
Porter; and Mozart's Quartet iri B-
flat.
Saturday at 8:30: Quartet in F, No.
1 by Beethoven; Quartet in C by
Shostakovich; and Quartet in F by
Dvorak.
Series tickets (including tax): $2.75,
$2.20 and $1.10; and tickets for single
concerts: $1.10 and 55c each--may be
purchased at the Offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton
Memorial Tower; and one hour before
each program in the main lobby of
the Rackham Builoing.
-Charles A. Sink, President
Organ Recital: Mr. F. Power Biggs,
one of today's foremost organists and
a Victor record artist, will appear as
guest organist at 4:15 p.m, today in
Hill Auditorium. He has acted as solo-
ist with the Boston, Chicago and Cin-
cinnati Symphony Orchestras and is
appearing in Ann Arbor through the
sponsorship of the School of Music.
The recital is open to the public.
Student Recital: Roberta Chatkin
and- Beverly Solorow, pianists, will
appear in a joint recital at 8:15 to-
night in Room 305, School of Music
Building on Maynard Street. In addi-
tion to compositions by Bach, Beetho-
ven, Schumann and Chopin, Misses
Chatkin and Solorow will play Aren-
sky's Romance and Valse for two pi-
anos. The students are pupils of Miss
Nell Stockwell and the recital will be
open to the general public.
Organ Recital: Arnold Blackburn,
organist, will give a recital in partial
fulfillment of the requirements for
the degree of Master of Music at 8:30
p.m. Thursday, Jan. 21, in Hill Audi-
torium. Mr. Blackburn is a pupil of
Palmer Christian and Organist and
Choirmaster of the Congregational
Church, Ann Arbor.
The recital is open to the publiq.
Exhibitions
Exhibition- Rackham Galleries-
Mezzanine Floor. The Horace H.

i

Rackham School of Graduate Studies
presents "Tunisia and the Mediter-
ranean in Water Colors" by Mrs.
Alice Reischer. The opening is tonight
at 7:00 and the galleries will be open
thereafter daily, except Sundays, 2-5
and 7-10.
The Research Club will meet in the
Amphitheatre of the Rackham Build-
ing tonight at 8 o'clock. The following
papers will be read, "The Damaged
Blueprints of Solomon's Temple" by
Professor Leroy Waterman and "The
Petroleum Age" by Professor George
G. Brown.
Inter-Guild Worship Committee
will meet in Larle Hall this afternoon
at 4:10. It is important that each
Guild have a representative at this
meeting.
Three Original One-Act Plays will
be presented at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre by the Hopwood Committee
and the Department of Speech to-
night at 8:00. Admission free to all.
Division of the Social Sciences:
There is to be an important meeting
of the entire Division on Thursday,
Jan. 21, at 8:00 p.m. in the fackham
Amphitheatre. All members are urged
to attend.
Episcopal Students: Holy Commun-
ion will be celebrated in Bishop Wil-
liams Chapel, Harris Hall, Thursday
morning at 7.30. Breakfast will be
served following the service.
Avukah, Student Zionist Federa-
tion, announces a seminar on Zion-
ism and related problems at Hillel
Foundation on Feb. 5, 6 and 7, during
the mornings and afternoons with
social activities in the evenings. All
are welcome.

ROTH

STRING QUARTET

FOUR DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS
IN THREE PROGRAMS
FERI RQTH, Violin JULIUS SHAlER,, Viola
S MUEL SIEGEL, Violin OLIVER EDEL, 'Cello
THIRD ANNUAL CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
LECTURE HALL --RACKHAM BUILDING
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JAN. 22-23
PROGRAMS
Friday Evening at 8:30:
Quartet in D major, Op. 76, No. 5 ..,.......Haydn
Quartet in D-flat major, No. 2............Dohnanyi
Quartet in F minor, Op. 95.............Beethoven

III

I

Continuing Our January
with BIG SAVINGS
THE PICK of our "good" coats, suits, dresses-all
priced to clear. Such "buys" will be snapped up
immediately! Hurry in and pick yourself a few "fash-
ion plums". Wear them now thru spring, and again
next year.

Saturday
Quartet
Quartet
Quartet
Saturday
Quarteti
Quartet
Quartet

Afternoon at 2:30:
in D major, No. 2 ..................Borodin
No. 4 ...... ................Quincy Porter
in B-flat major .....................Mozart
Evening at 8:30:
in F major, Op. 18, No. 1 ........,Beethoven
in C major, Op. 49............Shostakovich
in F major .........................Dvorak

Season tickets, tax incl. (three concerts4 $1.10-$2.20-$2.75
Single concerts, tax included, 55c-$1.10
On sale at Offices of University Musical Society,
Burton Memorial Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan

a-

The COATS

,nt f"
e
'" ,
! ..
/ _
f

This ai't
Ito jive-

Button in, zip-in lining coats, and also
carnels hair; shetlands, and untrimnied
1995 2500 29"s
Were 29.95 to 49.95
Sizes 10-44

dressy 'tweed,
reefers.
3995

The SUITS
PLAIDS . . . TWEEDS . . . SHETLANDS

1000

1495

1995

aN
t
°t iANNISM'SSIRTS
Man-Tailored Shirt
Celanese Pique . . . Short Sleeves

Old, Broken, and Worn-out

11W

I

I

is

cause

we need

I

I

Were 16.95 to 29.95
Sizes 9-20

I

We must have these old records
in order to get new recordings
for you

The DRESSES

1000

149

One- and two-piece crepes, wools, gabardines.
evening and dinner dresses at 5.00 and 7.00

Also

We will
pay YO

2 2c'

for each record
that you bring in

White only

Sizes 32-40

One- and two-piece crepes, wool mixtures, and also

I

1 11

11 III 1

II II 1*Excep La~t minated Reords

I

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