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September 29, 1942 - Image 22

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-09-29

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUES., SEPT. t9, 1942

TWO TUES., SEPT. 29, 1942

hanks

Face

Cards

In

World

Series

Play

All Conference-1941
FIRST TEAM

Cliff Keen's Departure Upsets
UniversityWrestling Program

Yankee Power Versus
Ca rdina iPitch ing AStaf
New York Backstops, infield, and Outfield Stronger;
Young Hurlers To Bear Brunt For St. Louis

The departure of the Wolverinel
wrestling coach, Cliff Keen, after 17,
years service as the mentor of Michi-;
gan wrestling teams, leaves the Ath-t
letic Department with an as yet un-
solved problem. In a recent inter-
view, Athletic Director Fritz Crisler
said, "Nothing definite has yet beenl
done to fill the vacancy, but you may
rest assured that we will find a cap-
able man to take the place of Coach.
Keen, while he is serving in the
Navy."
In spite of the departure of their
coach at the end of the season,
Michigan's matmen finished the sea-.
son in a more than creditable fash-
ion under the apt tutelage of Ray
Courtright, coach of the golf team.
Second in Conference
The team finished in a tie with
Illinois for second pace in the Big
Ten finals and finished fourth be-
hind a strong Oklahoma A&M in the
National Tourney.
The team lost but four lettermen
to graduation includ$ing last year's
captain, Jim Galles. The others who
received their diplomas last June
are Herb Barnett, at 135 pounds,
Morris Anderson, at 128 pounds, and
Eddie White, in the 135 pound class.
Anderson was ineligible the second
semester, due to scholastic difficul-
ties.
The personnel of next year's grap-
pling squad is very indefinite. Mary
Bec1ker, at 155 pounds, and Ray

Deane, 136 pounds, have applied for
entrance in Uncle Sam's Air Forces,
although it is uncertain when they
intend to enter. Deane took a second
place in the Big Ten tournament,
when he lost by a referee's decision
after two overtime periods. Becker
had passed his peak after a fine rec-
ord in dual meet competition and did
not live up to expectations in the two
tourneys. Tom Coffield has said that
he wanted to enlist in the Navy, but
as yet has done nothing about it.
Five Lettermen Return
Unless the, draft interferes there
will be five returning lettermen. Out-
standing among these is Manley
Johnson, who won the Big Ten title
in the 145 pound class and fnished
second in the Nationals. Johnson is
expected to attain new peaks during
next year's season.
Big Al Wistert and Johnny Greene,i
both heavyweights, will . also he
around next year. Wistert improved
greatly during the last part of the
season and is a possibility to cop both
Big Teri and National laurels. He
took fourth place in the Big Ten
matches.
Bill Courtright, cantein-elect for
this year, by finishing third in both
the Big Ten and Nationals, shows
promise of being Michiy'n's leaderl
next year. Junior Dick Kopel, al
121 pounder, also will provide plenty
of opposition for Michigan's foes on
the mat.

By CLARK BAKER
National unity will be tossed to the
winds, thousands of Americans will
be at each other's throats, and some
forty-odd diamond stars will battle
it cut for baseball's throne of honor
beginning tomorrow when New York
City's battlin' Yankees invade old
St. Louis to clash with Billy South-
worth's redoubtable Cardinals in the
opener of baseball's annual classic,
the World Series.
Who'll win? Ah, that's a secret that
even we are not fortunate enough to
be in on. But in the next few para-

Hassett, Joe Gordon, Phil Rizzuto
and Red Rolfe is unquestionably the
better of the two infields. The onlyy
weak spot is at third where the Cards'
George Kurowski must be rated over
the aging Rolfe. But even then it was
Rolfe who sparked the Yanks when
they threatened to collapse at mid-
season. On the whole, therefore, the
Cardinal quartet of Johnny Hopp,
Jimmy Brown, Marty Marion and?
Kurowski, while rating with the best,
must take a back seat to the Yank
inner defenders on both offense and
defense.
Not within memory, however, have
the Yankee outer' gardeners faced
such a formidable crew of outfielders
as the Cards boast. Joe Di Maggio,E
the Bronx Bombers' great centerfiel-
der, has had a bad year and cannot!
be rated much better than the
smooth-fielding Terry Moore. Moore
is not quite up to his usual hitting
standard, either, but his fly-chasing
ability hasn't fallen cff in the least.
Over in left field only the run-pro-
ducing ability of the Yank's Charley!
Keller gives him an cdge over the1
Cards' surprising rookic-of-the-yeaip,1
Stan Musial. The latter, though, tops
his Newr York foe by some 30 points
in batting and has been one of the
main cogs in the Westerners, pennant
surge.
Slaughter Has Edge
The right field situation more than
evens things up for tho St. L juis
club. Their Country Slaughter must
be given a big nod over the -Yanks'

In [en oriani
Michigan students were dis-
mayed to learn last July that Dr.
Elmer R. Townsley, of the Physi-
cal Education Department, had
I'r pze1 dead froni a heart attaek
while conducting a PEM class. V
1r. Townsley was the key man
it the University's Physical fitness
rrograin and acting head of the
Men's Physical Education.
His death comes not only as a
severe sheek to all who knew him
but a!o as a definite setback to
the University's physical education
program.
Dr. Townsley was considered a
cs der in new types cf physical ed-
uca tien instruction. His . aim was
to establish co-recreational work
as much as possible. Some time
bak, Townsley told the writer,
"Just as the boys and girls study,
go to shows and eat together, so
should they have the privilege of
rarticipating in a d.iversified
hci iuth program together."
His latest achievement was the
ph nned recreaticn program for
a4r raid shelters. Along with his
coslcague Miss Marie Hartwig, Dr.
Tc vnsley worked feverishly to
m ie this a successful course. And
it wras. When hec had completed it,
teioalsthe nation over were copy-
itg it. T ::.ay his students az c c:L-
z.; hi- t ci a al over the
Unxt d Nai in attempt to
U trs thoutled minds of those
Swh spr weary hcjes wating
'or the air raids to cnd.
Er. Tcvnsley s main aim in life
sjwi' , to give rorleproper enter-
tru7)ment and at the same time
wc'k in a sound physical educa-
tici progran, and you may be
.u- the iaj r cart of Dr. Towas-
7e,'s plans will not renain unno-
Heead.
This fall he was to succeed Dr.
Geerge May as head of the physi-
cal edutcation department. Since
his freshman yeax in cv liege Dr.
Townsley had hoped for the day
w1.en he would have this honor.
His chance came too late.
udenis have lost a real friend
in 'he passing of Dr. Townsley. It
was for them that he lived and as
Dr. Warren Forsythe paints out,
"It was for them that he died."
If Dr. Townsley had anything
sp ecial to say to students before
he died the sentences wculd have
contained the same words he used
in his classes.
"Have a whale of a good time
and l;e sure that you take care of
yourself so there can be many
mere."
By following these words Michi-
gan men and women can best re-
member Dr. Townsley.
-Mike Dann

Pc.
E.
T.
G.
C.
G.
T.
E.
jr'.
fi.

Player, School, Class Home
Bob Motl, Northwestern, Jr. ................................Chicago
Dick Wildung, Minnesota, Jr......................... Luverne, Minn.
Len Levy, Minnesota, Sr................................Minneapolis
]ab Ingalls, Michigan, Sr. .......................Marblehead, Mass.
Torn Milton, Purdue, Sr . ..........................Cedar Lake, Ind.
Alf Bauman, Northwestern, Sr.................. . ..........Chicago
Dave Schreiner, Wisconsin, Jr . ....... .............Lancaster, Wis.
Bill Hillenbrand, Indiana, Soph . .................... Evansville, Ind-
Bruce Smith, Minnesota, Sr................ .....Faibault, Minn.
Bill Daley, Minnesota, Jr..........................St. Cloud, Minn.
Bob Westfall, Michigan, Sr.......... .................Ann Arbnr-
- --- - --- - - - -

w

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FIG~URE OIJ
WHAT YOU .NLFJ
t~n u M es

nlew

Sqj/e

.7iiia

Utta;~L

341

141111

FOR YOUR BOUBLE-DUTY LIVE
- .
CASUAL, COMFORTABLE FOR
YOUR LEISURE WEAR

I

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I

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So, it's Bar Harbor Jacket
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Stripes, Overplaids, and
Bold Yarn Tweeds.

ee
WIIA MAN

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