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September 29, 1942 - Image 14

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-09-29

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1"GE TWO

40

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TVES., SEPT. 29, 1942

Judiciary Qroup
Governs Many
League Projects
To act as a disciplinary board in
xcases of infraction of University
"house rules, to accept petitions and
*interviewing for League positions, to
work with the Office of the Dean of
,Women in formulating house rules-
'these are the duties of the Judiciary
,Committee.
Headed by Lorraine Judson, the
a}oard also includes as senior mem-
tbers, Jane Schermerhorn and Ruth
NWood, while the juniors are Marilyn
Mayer and Ann MacMillan. This
group has complete jurisdiction over
.the violating of general residence
!regulations as well as campus regula-
,tions, which are referred to the com-
t Mittee by the Office of the Dean of
!Women. In addition to these powers
41he group also makes all recommen-
dations for League offices, standing
'committee chairmen of the Under-
graduate Council, central commit-
'tees for all class projects and the
;Orientation Advisors.
: A booklet of all the house rules,
vprepared by the Judiciary Committee,
.will be distributed to the new women
,on campus. The booklet includes
!rules on the government of houses,
:functions of officers, guests, closing
hours, late permission for campus
Kfunctions, and penalties for lateness-
,es. It is required that all women on
campus become familiar with these
:rules.

Class Of '46 Will Remember
Today's Trials, Tribulations
By PHYLLIS PRESENT that Orientation advisor's help
Dateline:-Someday-a long time though.
A. H. (after Hitler). across the bridge One night we stumbled through a
table, or will it still be gin rummy? line in the League ballroom, shaking.
hands with all the B. W. O. C.s on
Why, yes, I remember that bleak campus.Pretended boredom and ac-
October in '42, when I finally found ated blase, but come to think of it I
a room in Ann Arbor just two days recall feeling rather insignificant.
before school started. Of course, you That year was the "last of the
see, I always expected to go to Vassar, Turn To Page 5, Col. 4
but with depression-oh no, it was the
war, well, Dad decided Michigan
would be better. I r U ion
I was spoiled-I guess. Came to I

Dean Of Women

Rushing Pitfalls
To Be Alleviated
By Recent Rule
By JANET VEENBOER
For those freshmen who are still
(Icnfused by the whirl of orientation
week and for those returning upper-
classmen who are still not convinced
of the advisability of the new system
of deferred rushing. Virginia Morse,
'43, president of Panhellenic Associa-
tion, ha released a list of reasons for.
this unprecedented action of thei

Assembly To Offer
Variety Of Act-vities
To Women Students
(Continued from Page 1)
Ann Arbor, are the third; and the
last is Beta Kappa Rho which is corn-
S-osed of unaffiliated women students
who come from out of town, but who
work and live in Ann Arbor.
Executive officers of the entire As-
sembly group are Betty Newman,
president; Dorothy Schloss, vice-
president; Mary Moore, secretary:
and Roberta Holland, treasurer.
Social functions tentatively plan-
ned by the group for this year will be
Assembly Ball and Banquet. At the
Lanquet held during the first semester
for all independent women on cam-
pus, awards are given representatives
of the sophomore, junior and senior
classes having the highest scholastic
record for the previous year.

PERFUME
Cosmetic
Creations
You'll find all your
favorites at our spec-
ial counter.
Marshall's
235 So. State
Next to State Theatre

school with absolutely everything
"Mademoiselle" had to suggest. Re-
member those skimpy skirts and short
sweaters were just coming in. We
must have looked silly, but it was
"all out for the war effort", and we
took it with a grin.
Nylons Are Precious
That was the fall after the summer
we first used leg makeup and kept
cur nylons under lock and key. The
summer when we all were humming,
"He Wears a Pair of Silver Wings"
and dying to see "This Is the Army".
That first week at school was a
nightmare! They "oriented" us, or
something. All I remember is that we
kept meeting a serene looking senior
woman at 7:55 a. m. in front of Hill
Auditorium, and she kept us filling
out blanks and more blanks. How was
I supposed to know whether my
great-aunt Sally was anemic or not?
Don't know how I would have moved
into the University legally without

i1"

To Bring Noted,
Feminine Star
(Continued from Page 1)
work. All of her native energy had to
be summoned to the impossible task
of learning every major role in her
vocal range, a total of twenty-three ;
a task which would have stunned the
majority of would-be vocal artists.
During all periods of intense study,
Miss Swarthout has remembered a
rule given to her by Mary Garden,
that of learning by observing others.
"Listen to other singers with a broad
point of view and an open mind.
Young students are too critical. A
little humility will go a long way to-
wards opening new paths and
smoothing old ones."
Miss Swarthout has been able to
gain reknown in four fields of enter-
tainment; opera, concert, radio, and
sound films. She occupies a foremost
place at the Metropolitan Opera and
has taken part in practically all of
,the more important American opera
companies.
The singer's success in the above
fields has been mainly attributed to
her belief in the statement that, "a
young opera singer today has to be
a little of everything. Once you need-
ed a voice and little else. Now you
must have a face, figure and acting
ability to match the voice. You must
j have the technique of radio, the light
touch of musical comedy or operetta,
the sincerity aid dramatic intensity
of real opera, the poise and authority
of the concert hall."

ALICE C. LLOYD

SALLY WALSH...
WOMEN
and the WAR

Ir
"bGreene's,
Michigan's Favorite Drycleaner
Dial23-23-1

"WOMEN AND THE WAR" takes
great pleasure in presenting Sally
Walsh, '43, who has shown outstand-
ing work in her contribution to the
War 'effort as well as her activities
on the University campus.
Manifesting her immediate interest
in the emergency since her brother
John Andrew Walsh, '42, is now a Lt.,
junior grade, in active duty on the
Pacific, Sally has done volunteer
work at the surgery clinic of the Uni-
versity hospital this last year in every
free moment she could spare, and
took First Aid courses, while at the
same time doing noted work in cam-
pus activities.
-Now president of Scroll, senior
women's honor society, Sally was ap-
pointed stage manager for Theater
Arts, for which project she has serv-
ed as book-holder. During the past
year she has acted as secretary of
the Student Senate and is now rush-
ing chairman of her sorority. In ad-
dition Sally has assisted in the stage
committee of JGP, the Ruthven teas
and on the patron's committee for
Pan-Hellenic Ball.

F

board.
In the first place, from the stand-
point of the University deferred rush-
ing will probably lessen the number
cf students who enter the University
for purely social reasons, for it will
put the first emphasis upon the aca-
demic side of University of life. More-
over, the sororities themselves will
be given a chance to base invitation
to membership on real acquaintance
or friendship rather than on first ap-
pearance.
Freshmen Have Advantage
A sorority will also be safeguarded
from having pledges who cannot be
initiated on account of low grades,
for membership will now be some-
thing to be achieved through the test
of intellectual ability and through
observation of a girl's social worth
over a .period of time. The chances
of missing many fine girls and of tak-
ing "poor risks" will be avoided, for
selection will no longer be made on
superficial grounds with insufficient
acquaintance.
Advantages for the individual
freshman are manifold. In the first
place, she will be given an opportun-
ity to know the University as a whole
and to become somewhat oriented to
it before focusing attention upon a
smaller group. Shewill, moreover,
have a chance to have wide know-
ledge of all sororities on campus and
thus be able to make an intelligent
choice.
Authorities Back Opinions
The confusion of rushing will no
longer be added to the problems of
the freshman, who is surrounded with
a bevy of new experiences, a new en-
vironment, and new associates. In-
stead of feeling that the important
thing is to "make" a sorority, she will
be able to concentrate on her work.
Last, but not least, the colds and ex-
cessive fatigue which invariably re-
sult from rushing at the beginning of
school will be avoided under the new
system.
Three successive Panhellenic rush-
ing secretaries, academic advisors,
and members of the Health Service
staff all back these opinions. The
1threat of dirty rushing and bad feel-
ing developing between the sororities
need not be carried out if the sorori-
ties will be honorable. It will be a
test of the fineness and the character
training of each group.

302 South State Street
"al iiy wadService"

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I I I

Good News

Women Adjust To War Needs
With Short Jackets, Slim Lines,

YOU

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know someplacre where you can
buy smart clothes that are mod-
erately priced. Kay-Jay is the
downtown shopping center for

WE
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Kay-Jay Shop
221 South Moin

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Flexible-Cover Zipper 1

By BETTY HARVEY
Although a general furor greeted
the WPB decrees last spring, the
famed "adaptability" of the Ameri-
can woman seems to havehadjusted
the current tastes to the current war,
needs.
Short jackets, pencil-slim skirts,
and generally straight lines have
made the theme of the fall clothes
"trimness", "efficiency", and "ready,
for work". Except for the bitter
groans of the wide-hipped miss, (who
just can't seem to find a jacket long
enough to do the trick), the fall col-
lection of college garb is attractive as
well as practical, if wisdom is used
in the selection of a wardrobe.
Fewer But Better Wools
Woolens and tweeds are getting
fewer and more expensive! The smart
thing is to get FEWER but BETTER.
For instance, one good tweed suit
will give the wearer far more pleas-
ure and wear than three pairt wool
skirts and a jacket, all of which will
lose their shape and "pep" after some
hard wear. Look carefully for the la-
lotebooks
ingfolio
ets for pencils, papers, etc.
)nal Ringfolio.
of room for what have you?
5c -$1.85

bel "100% Wool", and if it's there,
you are assured of a good buy.
The same can be said foi dwoolen
dresses. If the purchase is made with
an eye to the future, there will be
fewer good wools in the college girl's
wardrobe, but they will be staunch
standbys throughout the four years.
If they're classics, they'll be in style
in 1946, too.
Brighten Wardrobe
Conservativeness can be forgotten
in choosing a date dress. Something
bright and flattering is called for and
accessories can well depart from the
"tried and true' Unusual blouses,
colorful dickies, and the like will be
a welcome relief from an overdose of
the "classics" but don't be fooled by
all the tricky stuff put on the market.
You'll tire of them quickly and will
shove them in back of your closet
very soon.
As for formals, they will shortly be
non-existent so bring what evening
dresses you have and don't invest in
one until you definitely find you'1
need it.
Ann Arbor Necessities
Necessities for braving Ann Arbor
weather include a warm winter coat
a raincoat, mittens, scarfs, boots and
kerchiefs. Ankle socks are also in-
cluded in this category-and the new
nylon spun variety are recommendec
for warmth, wear and looks.
This year's wardrobe must be ready
for work, ready for fun and ready for
the future.

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Young . . . high-spirited . . .
versatile! Wear it in several of
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GAGE LINEN SH OP

10 NICKELS ARCADE

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