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November 03, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-11-03

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TUSDN.I THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Bill Ludoiph Is
Trueblood Golf
Troph Wimner
Bill' Ludolph won over Mort Cohn,
in the finals of the annual Trueblood
Golf Tournament in a match played:
Sunday at the University Course.:
There was a cold, bitter wind which'
hampered both players until finally
Cohn had to forfeit the match at the'
end of the fourteenth hole after he
had won the first and lost the next
thirteen holes. :
Ludoph had previously beaten
Howard Wikel, four up and three {to
go;. Cohn was victorious over .lenn
Jorn, 2 and 1.
This tournament, emblematic of the
all-campus champion, is held each
fall to encourage those linksmen who
show exceptional promise to display
their talents. It is open only to scho-
lastically eligible undergraduates who
have never won a major award in
golf.
All students who want refunds-
for their Great Lakes game tickets,
are requested to call for them at;
the Athletic Administration bul4-
ding by November 5. No refunds
will be made after that time. The
Administration building is open
from 8:00 a. m. to 9:00 p. m.
Harry Tillotson

WISTERT SPELLS TROUBLE:
Wolverines' Great Tackle Bids
for All-American Recognition

i

1ENCHCOMBER

Number eleven may belucky for
some people but it has meant nothing
but bad luck for Michigan's oppo-
nents this fall. That number on the
shirt of Michigan's great tackle, Al
Wistert, has been popping up at too
many inopportune moments for op-
posing coaches..
To .quote once more Lynn Wal-
dorf's now famous statement after
the Northwestern - Michigan game
would probably be repeating what ev-
eryone has already heard, but no
story on, Wistert .would. be complete
without it. Quoth the Wildcat men-
tor: "He's the best offensive lineman
in the Midwest. When he cuts down
a man, there's nothing left but the
stump." There you have it, and Mr.
Waldorf ought to know.
Didn't Play Before
Al didn't4 play football in high
school. In fact, his high school didn't
even have a football team. But, un-
daunted by his comparative inexperi-
enpe, the big fellow went out for the
Wolverine freshman eleven. The Wis-
tert-of 1938 played at end and, al-
though the coaches didn't go so far
as to point him out as a future All-
American, they' thought that he
showed .plenty of promise.
Al switched to tackle in 1939 but
did not play at all that fall. In a
practice session -before the opening
contest, he sustained a sprained ankle
and, rather than play only part of
the season, he elected to postpone the
start of his varsity career until the
following fall.
Starred In 1940
Tom Harmon was running wild for
Michigan in 1946, but that didn't
j stop Wistert. He started and played
his first game of organized football
against California that fall and from
then on the 240?pound tackle wasl
bnie' ofthe stalwrts of the Wolverine
foiwar& wall. On the afternoon re-
sevedfor the niich-publicized back-
field dual betweenjlarmon and Frank
-'eagan' ofPenn,. Wister-t stole the
show with;his spectacular line play.
Overshadowed by Alf ,Bauman of
*Tprthwestern- and' Urban. Odson 'of
MVinnesota, Al; nevertheless, ,hauled
down- a tackle .spot on 'the, Big Ten
second team,
With good reserves, a scarcity last
fall the ,big -lineman assumed the
roe ofta 0,-inute; man. nlaying in
all but a few minutes of Michigan's

eight contests. Althougn "the Ox"
was somewhat of a disappointment
to Wolverine fans, who had predicted
All-American for him in 1941, his
steady play and experience was an
invaluable asset to a line which in-

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Badgers y T
MADISON, Wis., Nov. 2.-(A)-Wis-
consin's Badgers had visions of their
first Big Ten football championship
in 30- years before them today but
they brushed them aside and started
pointing for their next engagement
with Iowa at Iowa City Saturday.
The players came through the Ohio
State game in fine.' shape and today
were given only a light limbering up
drill. Pat Harder, whose plunging and
defensive work against the Buckeyes
was one of the highlights, had fully
recovered from a hard bump in the
head that had him groggy for a while
Saturday.
- *
Bucks Try New Halfback
COLUMBUS, O., Nov. 2.- (I)-
Tomny James inay get his chance to
show whether'he's the "flash" runner
.Ohio State is hunting.
Coach Paul Brown, reviewing Sat-
urday's 17-7 loss to Wisconsin, said
the Badger victory convinced him the

AL WISTERT ' .
hard-charging lineman who
has become a familiar and awesome
figure to Wolverines' opponents.
cluded two first-year men. Al was
again ranked high on the list of
Conference linemen.
This fall the big tackle is taking
up where he left off in 1941 im' his
quest for .All-American honors. He
has been one of the big reasons why
Michigan's six opponents have aver-
aged only 83 yards per game through
the Maize and Blue forward wall.
Read over Lynn Waldorf's statement
about Wistert again, multiply it by
six (once for each opponent this sea-
son) and you'll have a rough idea of
Al Wistert's value to the 1942 Mich-
igan team.
Bucks need a spot runner-a player
who might break loose and be a
touchdown threat everat time he got
the ball.
"Hirsch was that kind and he fixed
us," Brown said, recalling the Badger
whose long runs kept the Bucks back
on their heels.
The Bucks rested today. They meet
Pittsburgh here next Saturday.
Gophers Take It Easy
MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 2.- (A)- It
was the usual leisure Monday after
victory for the Minnesota football
team today.
The Gophers, who defeated North-
western, 19-7, Saturday came out of
the game with but few minor bruiseq,
end Bill Baumgartner was nursing his
right shoulder while halfback Dick
Kelley took a heat treatment on his
sore ankle.
IM Volleyball Season
Begins -Monday Night
Officially opening the 1942-43 in-
tramural season, volleyball teams in
the dormitory, fraternity, indepen-
dent, and graduate leagues will play
the curtain-raisers in their respec-
tive divisions beginningnextgMonday
night at the Sports Building.
Competition in these loops will con-
tinue until after Christmas when bas-
ketball will take over. Also beginning
next Monday, the Sports Building will
remain open until 10 p. m. for the
use of all students.
TYPE W R IT E R
IN GOOD SHAPE

By BUD HENDEL
Daily Sports Editor
* * * *
ANYTHING CAN HAPPEN in football, but a strong hupch prevails
that it won't happen here Saturday. Michigan resumes gridiron
relations with ancient Harvard, and unless the venerable gentlemen of
old Crimson have rediscovered their lost touch, the Wolverines should
sweep to an easy victory before the slimmest crowd of the season.
At one time the lure of a pigskin battle between these two
luminaries of the block-an'-tackle-'em society would have attracted
the good neighbors from miles and miles around. But that time is
no more, and if Saturday's crowd soars above the 20,000 mark
somebody will slide off his bench in something much more than
mild surprise.
The Harvards, and we say this without any fear of contradiction,
have not been a howling success this season. They have won one game,
last week's 19-14 deision over Princeton, have tied one, William & Mary
7-7, and have lost four others, to North Carolina Cadets, Penn, Army'
and Dartmouth. That is not an impressive record, and it's a far cry
from the Harvard of old.
If anything, this Harvard team is an advocate of the defensive
school of strategy. Dick Marlow, who coaches the Cambridge boys,
made a move to pep up their offense when he switched to the single
wing-back form of attack last week instead of the "T" that he's em-
ployed with no success whatever all year.
Once a perennial power in grid circles, the Crimson has fallen fast.
The second largest crowd in Michigan football history thronged the
Stadium for a Harvard game, 85,042 fans making the walls bulge in 1929.
But, believe it or not, the Harvards have the advantage in their series
with the Wolverines. They won the first four games in 1881, 1883, 1895
and 1914. Since then, however, Michigan has racked up three straight
victories and barring miracles will even the count here Saturday.
This game, incidentally, almost didn't materialize. A growing
opinion took form among Harvard students that the team shouldn't
make the trip in the best interests of the war effort. Crimson Ath-
letic Director William J. Bingham soon put down the mild uprising
and scotched all rumors by saying that all arrangements had been
completed and only a government order would cancel the excursion
westward. So the Harvards, good sportsmen that they are, will be in
the Stadium at kickoff time this Saturday.
E PRINT a letter we received. It concerns that celebrated Michigan-
Minnesota Mess. It isn't very complimentary.
"Dear Sir: (Ed. note-Notice the colon-never used on friendly
letters we learned in grade school.)
"It is a peculiar coincidence that Michigan should be represented
by as excellent a sportsman as Fritz Crisler and as unsportsmanlike a
character as the Daily Sports Editor. (Ed. note-The guy means me and
I'm the kind of person who even puts the cat out at night.)
"Since when is it the responsibility of a coach to keep track of
time outs, officially? From Minnesota's record in football for the
last ten years it appears they have paid more attention to the games
than any other team in the country, including mighty Michigan.
(Ed. note--He makes concessions too.) When Dr. Hauser refused to
shoot off his mouth about the whole thing he was merely staying in,
an ethical positio.... (Ed. note-He also put himself right on the
hot spot.) Minnesota has never had to hedge from anyone, least of
all from a stellar authority like the Daily Sports Editor. (Ed. note-
Thank you.)
".... The whole matter has been officially cleared by now, however,
and if you have been reading the papers you may have noticed the vic-
tory for Minnesota stands. (Ed. note-Remarkable power of observa-
tion-yes, I have been reading the papers and I have noticed the dis-
gusting result.) . . . The Gophers have never given a game away yet
so you don't have to harbor any thoughts about being able to talk
anybody into. anything. (Ed. note-The Gophers, it seems, don't even
give them away when they lose.)
"Yours for success in the far distant future when per chance
you will have learned to quit quibbling and accept defeat in stride
the way they do in Minneapolis. (Ed. note-They accept gift vie-
tories in Minneapolis too, or am I wrong again.)
Sincerely,
W. Erickson, Minnesota '35."
And thank you, Mr. Erickson. We are glad to see you follow our
activities so closely and are such a faithful reader of The Daily. Of
course, we wouldn't think of stepping on anyone's toes again in this
column. You have taught us a lesson. And so has Minnesota-Fritz
Crisler is a great sportsman. But what about Dr. Hauser?

i

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picas

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Given a rest after the bruising bat- two different colored horses. Th
tle with Illinois Saturday, Michigan's gam it Har d Strday To
Maie ad Bue ridersspet Mn-game with Harvard Saturday doe
Maize and Blue griddersspent Mon- not appear to present much difficult
day's practice period concentrating to the gridders, as the Crimson tear
on movies, and only went through has won only one game, an upse
limbering up exercises, with no stren- last week over Princeton, and shoul
uous practice. prove no stumbling block even thoug
Although the gridders had a good the Wolverines are hampered wit
Saturday, and topped the Illini by a injuries.
respectable margin, the backfield Irish Will Be Tough
came out of the fray with several in-
juries which will probably keep it However, the battle for which th
from being at full strength for the Wolverines will be pointing is th
Harvard game Saturday. Notre Dame ga-me to be at, Souti
ThreInrd e aturBend, week after next. Unless th
Three Injured Isquad has another unfortunate da
Wolverine casualties from Satur- Saturday, it is hoped that the whol
day include Don Boor, who played a team will be in top condition agar
clever game at the fullback post un- for the Irish tilt.
til he sprained his ankle and had to If Harvard's team lacks the nee
be taken out; Tomn Kuzma, who essary strength to match the WolveJ
turned his ankle in the very first play ines Saturday, it is probable that
of the game, but played throughout will be another game marked 1
the half. He made some significant many substitutions, which will giv
yardage, even though playing under the second stringers, like stocky Bc
such a handicap, and Don Robinson, Stenberg, a chance to prove the
who entered the game and played worth as they did last weekend.
with a bruised shoulder, which was
aggravated in almost every play, and
which is still very sore. Trainer Ray MICH IGAN MEN ! !
Roberts, however, declares that this Your hair, scalp is our PROBLEM-
injury is not serious. If your hair isn't becoming to you,
Varsity Has Rest you should be coming to us.
The gridders have a two week res- -Ive brarbers to serve you---
pite from conference competition, but The ASCOLA BARBERS
these intersectional battles will be J Between state and Mich Theatre
lira : -~-- -- - -

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