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September 29, 1942 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUES,SEPT. 29, 1942

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

New Lectures
To Probe War,
Peace Ideals
Experts To Lead Course
Of Unique Discussions
In Post-War Problems
Fast progressing plans for a unique
course, Social Studies 93, problems
of the war and of the peace, will give
junior and senior students a compre-
hensive insight into the friction
points of maintaining permanent
peace after the war.
The course, given inter-depart-
mentally in the literary college, will
be for two hours credit, and will con-
sist of lectures. The class will meet
on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2 p.m.
in Room C, Haven Hall.
Lectures by experts on economics,
political science, geography, sociology
and history will give a balanced out-
line of the various problems which
will become important after the ces-
sation of hostilities.
The emphasis of the new course
will be on the general outlines of the
problems rather than on any specific
blueprint proposed as a solution to
the problems of peace. An integral
part of the course will be a discussion
of the broad peace aims of the bel-
ligerents.
The causes of the present war will
be outlined to give a clear view of
the problems which must be faced at
.the conclusion, of the war. From this
beginning the topics will turn to the
general ideas for maintaining peace
permanently. More specific problems
will be treated -by lecturers in spec-
ialized fields.
Designation of the chairman of the
course is yet lacking. Specific details*
will be released later.

Center To Aid
toU' Foreign
Students Here
With war separating them from
their home lands, University foreign
students will turn more and more
for advice and comfort this year to
the International Center under the
direction of Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson.
The Center provides a varied year-
ly program to aid the students from
other lands in adjusting themselves
to their new environment and in be-
coming acquainted with their fellow
American students.
An outstanding service offered by
the Center is the Counselor's Office.
It was organized by the University in
1933, even before the formal organ-
ization of the International Center
itself. Professor Nelson, director of
the Center, also acts as counselor.
The Counselor's Office helps for-
eign students with their problems of
housing and' employment, registra-
tion and classification, language, im-
migration and naturalization and
personal affairs.
In the fall of 1938, five years after
the establishment of the Counselor's
Office, the International Center was
opened. Between 1933 and 1938 a
program of activities had been de-
veloped that was of such benefit to
foreign students as to warrant a per-
manent organization. The Center
now serves not ,only as a meeting
place for foreign students but is
opened to anyone interested in in-
ternational affairs.
Of vital importance to foreign stu-
dents is the Center's' English lan-
guage service. Other language serv-
ices have also been included in the
Center's program in the past. The
German table and the French round-
table are familiar to many students
on the campus.

Union Set To Serve Michigan
Men With 'Club Like' Facilities.

Libraries Give
Study Facilities
To All Students,
More than a million books, period-'
icals and references in the huge Ltii-
versity library system await the use
of undergraduates and faculty mem-
bers this year.
From the General Library, square
in the center of the campus, and
branch libraries in Angell and Tap-
pan halls, in buildings of various col-
leges and the University Hospital,
Professor Warner G. Rice, director
of the system, can command the dis-
tribution of 1,168,612 books.
Opened in 1920, the main library
building has seats for about 1,000 per-
sons in its numerous reading and
study rooms. Through the summer
its facilities have been in constant
use. The General Library is open
from 7:45 to 10 p.m. daily and the
periodical room and the main reading
room remain open from 2 p.m. to 9
p.m. on Sunday.
Books may be drawn from, the
stacks at the delivery deskron the
second floor for use in the library
or charged at the charging desk for
home use.
Most books may be retained for
home use for a period of two weeks.
A fine of five cents a day is charged
for overdue books.
Current issues of more than 1600
different periodicals are kept for stu-
dent use in the periodical room.
The Library is maintained by an
annual appropriation of the Board of
Regents. The present General Lib-
rary building was erected at a cost of
$615,000.00.
American historical collections are
on exhibit from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. daily
in the William L. Clements Library.
Printed catalogue cards issued by
the Library of Congress in Washing-
ton are used in the library filing sys-
tem along with card publications of
the John Crerar Library of Chicago,
American Library Associates, Harvard
University and the University of Chi-
cago.

University Flying Club
Helps Toward License
The University Flying Club, a
member of the National Intercol-
legate Flying Club, is accepting non-
flying students for membership for
the first time this year, because'most
flying students have left for service
in the nation's flying services.
Operating from the Ann Arbor
Airport, the club has a program of
competitive flying with other colleges
in the vicinity, as well as building up
flying time toward getting licenses
and teaching new members to fly.
Individual members with sufficient
flying time have recently become
members of the Civil Air Patrol.
In Intercollegiate Flying Club com-
petitions, the University club won
first place two years ago, and was
second last year.

WJR Will Broadcast
Nine Programs Weekly
The University radio studios locat
ed in Morris Hall will originate nin
programs a week this fall. These pro
grams will be broadcast over statio:
WJR in Detroit and will be presente
by the students and faculty of th
University.
Tentative plans call for four of th
programs to be student written, direc
ted and acted.
Fountain Pens
R IDER'S$
302 S. State St.
Typewriters

Iif ,

EDWARD R. HOLMBERG, JR. DONALD C. WEST:

FEAN IDENTIFICATION
SCA RD CASE
Just made to hold your official U. of M.
Identification Card and Draft Card. Drop
in and get one at MARSHALL'S, 235
South State Street.

Michigan's Lwo-million-dollar in-
vestment for men only-the Michigan
Union-began another semester of
services yesterday when it became the
orientation gathering point for all
entering freshmen and transfer stu-
dents.
Aside from the guest room facili-
ties, the Union offers members the
use of the two tap-room cafeterias,
the dining room, Ann Arbor's largest
barber shop, a swimming pool, steam
bath, bowling alleys, pool room, bil-
liards and ping pong, the Pendleton
reading library, and rooms for stu-
dent offices and meetings.
To obtain membership advantages,
male students have only to present
their cashier's receipt stub at the un-
dergraduate offices between 3 and 5
p. m. any afternoon.
Offices In Union
Housed in first floor offices, the
Union staff steers many campus ac-
tivities and services and furnishes
students with any information de-
sired about the University or the
Union.;.
Donald.C. West, '43E, and Edward
R: Holmberg, Jr.,. '43, are presidenit
and secretary of the Union staff.
Members of the Junior staff, which
handles all Union social, recreatiorial
and scholastic functions, are Marvin
L. Borman, '44, David F: Striffler,
'44, Richard C. Ford, '44, Arthur J.
Geib, '44E, Burnett H. Crawford,'44,
Alan E. Brandt, '44, Robert B. Shott,
'44E, Charles M. Dotterrer, '44E, Rob-
ert L. Schwyn, '44; and Herbert S.
Heavenrich, '44E.
President West has asked that all
students secure their membership
cards before attempting to cash
checks at the Union main desk.
Some of the larger projects spon-
sored each year b- the Union include
a Union Formal, "Coke" Bars, a book
exchange, and week-end dances. War
activities such as a blood bank have

also been handled during the past
year.
Second semester freshmen are ad-
vised that they are now eligible, if
proper grades have been attained, to
"try out" for the Union staff. Offer-
ing numerous opportunities for exec-
utive and business training, the staff
provides excellent training for inter-
ested students.
The senior president and secretary,
as well as the Junior staff, receive
appointments each April for the com-
ing year..
Arch, School
Plans Mixer
One of the leading architectural
schools in the country, the Univers-
ity of Michigan's College of Architec-
ture and Design offers a full quota
of courses in all phases of architec-
ture, drawing and painting, land-
scape architecture, interior decorat-
ing and industrial design.
*A tentative schedule::of -.activities
has. been proposed for the coming
fall semester by the School. This will
include:
1)- A mixer for freshn en during
Orientation Week.
2) A student-faculty reception
during the first or second week of
school.
3) Faculty teas to which students
are invited.
4) Discussion groups and. lectures
throughout the year by promiinent
men in various fields.,
5) Design awards for outstanding
work by students.
6) The traditional Architectural
Ball to- be hld in conjuniction with
the Business Administration School.
7) Trips to points of interest for
architectural students and faculty.

Z'ranciico

0c

7114/ome to J/nnJirtor
the Campus Headquarters
for Photo Supplies
Thera may be few new cameras to be gotten these
days, but there is no rationing of picture-taking. Let
us serve your film, and photographic paper needs.
CARDS, for every occasion
We welcome you to inspect our complete selection
of greeting cards. Birthdays - Christmas cards for
friends in the service and at home - anniversaries -
for any occasion that demands a remembrance, we have
.a card to fit your needs.

11

723 North University

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=Michigan's Favorite Drycleaner
Dial 23-23=1

FO LLETT'S-
STU DENT -SUPPLIES
0 Get the Follett habit and turn the pennies into
dollars by shopping at Michigan's largest one-stop
Classroom Supply Store.

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* LOOSE LEAF
1Oc, 25c,
* NOTEBOOKE

NOTEBOOKS...
35c, 45c, 50c, $1.00,.$1.50, $1.85
PAPER, All Sizes, Ruled or Plain . lOc

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Michigan
Wolverine

" SCRATCH PADS..'. 100 Sheets Per Pad . .
" STUDY LAMPS... $1.25 to $3.45
" FOUNTAIN PENS ... All Makes from 25c
w MICHIGAN PENNANTS .. Oc to $3.00
* MICHIGAN PILLOWS... $3.00 to $5.00
* DESK BLOTTERS... 3-for 25c
* DESK PADS ... 49c and up
* ARCHITECTURAL SUPPLIES
" ENGINEERING SUPPLIES
* BIOLOGY SUPPLIES
* MICHIGAN JEWELRY
* LAUNDRY CASES. . .$1.19 to $2.25

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* GREETING CARDS FOR ALL OCCASIONS
* MICHIGAN STICKERS... 2 for 5c and up

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"the students' own dining club"
20 MEALSat5.83 (plus tax)
Or any combination of meals
at proportionate prices.

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SCRAP BOOKS ... 25c-$5.00
K&E SLIDE RULES
SPIRAL NOTEBOOKS . .. 5c-35c
COLLEGE PETS ... $1.19-$3.98
MICHIGAN BLANKETS
ENGRAVED FRATERNITY STATIONERY... 79c

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As soon as you are classified and know- your courses corn
to FOLLETT'S -
Every advance sale guaranteed to be the right book for th
right course or you receive a cash refund.

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