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October 28, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-28

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CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

THE MICHIGAN. DAILY rAea
Gridders Prepare For Hard Strech Drive

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISING
RATES
Non-Contract
$ .40 per 15-word insertion for
one or two days. (In-
crease of 10c for each
additional 5 words.)
$1.00 per 15-word insertion for
3 or more days. (Increase
of $.25 for each additional
5 words.)
Contract Rates on Request
Our Want-Ad Department
will be happy to assist you in
composing your ad. Stop at the
Michigan Daily Business Of-
fice, 420 Maynard Street.
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING to Buffalo, N. Y., Friday
afternoon, returning Sunday night.
Can take 1-2 passengers. Call
2-3868.
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY -2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price.
MICHIGAN
I .I
* *CHARLES BOYER
* RITA HAYWORTH
* GINGER ROGERS,
* HENRY FONDA
CHARLES LAUGHTON
* EDWARD G. ROBINSON.
* PAUL ROBESON
* ETHEL WATERS
*'ROCHESTER'
STICRRINHO IN
TALES OF
MANHATTAN,
wift THOMAS MITCHELL " EUCENE PALtflTE
CETSAR ROMEO * GAIL PATRICi
ROLAND YOUNG . ESA LACESTER
GEORGE SANO JAMESCUMS
md THE HALL JOHNSON CHOIR
Mats. 25c Eves. fc'
Sunday Del Courtney on Stage

FOR SALE
=PERSONAL STATIONERY. - 100
sheets and envelopes, $1.00. Printed
with your name and address-
The Craft Press, 305 Maynard St.
FOR RENT
FOR RENT:Halfof large front suite
to girl student. One-half block
from campus. Mrs. Wood, 725
Haven Ave., phone 5938.
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING-Thesis binding.
Brumfield and Brumfield, 308 S.
State.
MAKE MONEY-on your used cloth-
ing by phoning Claude H. Brown,
2-2736, 512 S. Main.
WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL-
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Co., phone 7112.
LOST and FOUND
LOST: Glasses; dark horn; rimmed
in black; Health Service case.
Call 2-4514.
REWARD OFFERED for copy Shaf-
tesbury's Characteristics lost in
Angell Hall. English Office, 3221.
LOST and desperately needed! Brown
saddle zipper ,notebook. Around
Waterman Gym-Reward. Moore,
917 E. Ann.
WILL PERSON who took Season
Skipper coat from ladies' lounge
of Michigan League Friday evening,
by mistake, please return to League
Desk and take their own.
'HELP WANTED
STUDENTS for part-time employ-
ment. Beer Vault, 303 North Fifth
Avenue. Phone 8200.
TYPIST. Male or Female. Accurate
with fair degree of speed. High
School oreCommercial College
trained preferred, Permanent full:
or part time position with long
established State Street Store, An-
swer fully. Box 38 Michigan Daily.
HELP WANTED-FEMALE
WANTED-Student waitresses for
main dining room. Apply to man-
ager, Michigan Union.
HELP WANTED-MALE
YOUNG MAN WANTED with bicycle
for messenger and inside work, 6
to 10 p.m. Apply Postal Telegraph,
112 East Huron.

Illini Are First
Of Dangerous
Michigan Foes
Expect 'Seven Oak Posts'
To Be Ready For Clash
With Orange Saturday
By BUD LOW
The Minnesota game is a thing of
the past, and the entire Wolverine
grid squad is buckling down to the
job of preparing for the stretch drive.
With five games left in a ten game
schedule, the present Michigan team
faces the most gruelling task that
any Maize and Blue squad has been
confronted with since the days of
Fielding H. Yost's "point-a-minute"
elevens at the beginning of the cen-
tury.
Many teams throughout the nation
play ten or more games, but very few
if any come up against the high
calibre opposition that the Varsity
faces week after week. Of the five
contests left, three are with teams
ranked above Michigan in the AP
poll, and all three have shown that
the Midwest is the football center
of the nation by bowling over oppo-
sition right and left. The Harvard
tilt is the only one that can be con-
sidered a breather.
The Illini are the foe this week.
Beaten only by an amazing Notre
Dame squad last Saturday, the Or-
ange and Blue hold victories over
South Dakota, Butler, Iowa, and
Minnesota. The Irish downed them
last week 21 to 14, but only after
Illinois had yielded under the pres-
sure of carrying the battle all the
way. Ray Eliot has done wonders
with his team this year-a team that
undoubtedly is the best that has
come out of Champaign in eight
years.
So far the Wolverines have lost
two out of five contests, and if at
all possible they don't want any more
tilts on the wrong side of the ledger.
The Varsity will be fighting mad, in
addition to being determined to stay
in the Conference race at all costs.
On the other hand, the Illini have
won two Big Ten contests and they
will be out to protect their lead.
Coach Fritz Crisler sent his charges
through a light scrimmage and drill
yesterday after giving them a two
day lay-oft following the Gopher
game last Saturday. Every man on
the team was in uniform, but several
of them were far from being in the
best of condition.
Don Robinson still is nursing a
badly bruised shoulder and may see
only limited service against Illinois,
but should be ready to go if badly
needed. Bob Wiese was limping
around, and although he may not
start the game, he too should see
action. The other injured back, "T"
Wardley, has a bruised hip but it is
nothing serious.
Strangely enough the line is intact,
and with the exception of Elmer Ma-
dar, no one was more than shaken

Mort Qoper NOTICE
aile U. of M. golf course will close for
arns ward the season Sunday, Nov. 1. Those
persons who have clubs in the lkck-
B -ECUJEik I k 1 IRj~ ers at the links are requested to
Card Hurler Named NL's remove them before above date.
Most Valuable Plaver H. T. Rogus Manarer

By BIUD JENREL
Daily Sports Editor
THIS MICHIGAN-MINNESOTA situation is becoming amusing.
Nobody has anything to say except the newspapers.
Michigan is being acclaimed for its good sportsmanship. Fritz
Crisler hasn't filed any protest and he doesn't intend to. Minnesota,
on the other hand, is doing a fumbling bit of hedging. The Gophers
don't know what to do.
R. GEORGE HAUSER said yesterday when he was talked to over the
long distance wire that he didn't know if Minnesota had already ex-
hausted its three time-outs when the substitution took place. He said, "I'm
not sure . . ." That's hard to believe, but we won't call the good doctor a
liar. Maybe he doesn't know what's going on in a game his team plays.
Maybe he was so afraid his team would lose that he honestly didn't know
if Minnesota had taken three time-outs. We hereby advise the good doctor
to pay more attention to these Saturday football games. He might learn
something valuable to help Minnesota the next Saturday.
Hauser told The Daily that Major Griffith was the man to talk to, that
he himself didn't know a thing about the whole thing. Wonderful interest
he evidences in his team, wonderful. Until we reached him yesterday, Hauser
hadn't spoken to a single reporter. News services have been trying to con-
tact him since the game, but he wouldn't see anybody. I wonder what the
good doctor has to fear. After all, Minnesota did win.
Or maybe the good doctor doesn't honestly think so. Maybe he too
thinks Michigan was the real winner. If he were sure Minnesota de-
served its victory, he would have been equally as sure referee Masker
acted correctly on the disputed drop-kick play. But the good doctor
merely said when asked, "I hgave no comment."
AND REFEREE MASKER'S REMARKS also show an admirable quality
of not knowing what to do when placed on the hot spot. Said Masker,
"I don't know how many time-outs Minnesota had." It might be a good
idea for him to watch those things more closely. He's only the head official
on the field during a game. He almost dodged us last night, though. But
we tricked him. He wouldn't answer a person to person call, but he did
answer one station to station when the operator didn't say, "Ann Arbor
calling."
I wonder what he's worrying about.. He is considered a competent offi-
cial and one mistake won't ruin him. In fact, he's going to work the
Michigan-Harvard tussle. Not more than two years ago, Red Friesell
admitted that he gave Cornell five downs against Dartmouth in a touch-
down drive, and Cornell awarded the game to Dartmouth after Friesell ad-
mitted his mistake. And Friesell is still considered one of the finest in the
nation.
Masker is inpocent until proved guilty, but what more proof is
needed? I wish he'd come out with a statement that he did make a
mistake and clear the whole mess up.
Over Hill, Over Dale:
Cross-Country Runs Combine
FuExercise For Track men'

Last Times
Today !

Fibber McGee and Molly
"HERE WE G0 AGAIN"

TOMORROW!
Starts Thursday -

.O W3S ',MYf 1Y~lj

up.

T

Added Attractions
Famous Royal!I Our Last I World
Jury Trial Araby Frontier News
Coming E cd
Sunday! SONYA H EN IE celand"

BIG TEN STANDINGS
Ohio State ......3 0 0 78 27
Illinois .........2 0 0 32 20
Wisconsin .......1 0 0 13 0
MICHIGAN .....1 1 0 48 32
Iowa ...........1 1 0 21 25
Minnesota....... 1 0 29 34
Purdue .........1 2 0 7 45
Indiana .........0 2 0 34 46
Northwestern .. .0 3 0 28 61
FRESHMAN BASKETBALL
Freshmen interested in trying
out for the freshman basketball
squad are invited to come out for
practice at 7:30 p. m. on Monday,
Nov. 2, in Waterman Gymnasium.

By DES HOWARTH
Cross country is a run-for-the-fun.
sport these days, combining work with
pleasure, and those out for the dis,-
tance comment that they are really
enjoying it.
Instead of the usual daily grind
over a certain distance day after day,
the dalemen this seasoi have a vary-
ing system. Some days they run hard,
some days they play volleyball before
taking a workout and other times.
they run against time.
Coach Ken Doherty explains that
there is method to his scheme, how-
ever, for the new procedure has a
definite aim. "Conditioning is of
prime importance these days, and I
don't know of any better sport than
cross-country to condition a fellow"
That the sport is actually fun may
be testified by the fact that there
are over 50 fellows out for this aut-
umn sport about half of whom are
varsity trackmen. The other half are
transfers from P. E. M.
The Varsity men have a double pur-
pose in their conditioning, however,
for they are getting in shape for next
year's track competition. Led by Capt.
Dave Matthews, they include distance
men Willis Glas, John Ingersoll, John

Roxborough, Ernie Leonardi, and Jim
Conant. Art Upton, Ross and Bob
Hume, and Roy Currie are among the
promising sophomore distance men
on the squad.
Since the track season is a long way
off, it is difficult to keepathe interest
in track if the routine is a continuous
grind; but the fellows nevertheless
must be in condition when the season
rolls around. By adding obstacle races,
handicap races, and treasure hunts,
in the latter where the emphasis is
upon brains and running ability, the
interest is enlivened. The initiation
of volleyball this fall makes cross-
country even more interesting.

WARTIME TELEPHONE TIPS

/1ere TeAe e &'

i

The 1942-43 Social

Season

Scotch Plaid and Solid
Colors - Cotton Flan-
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opens

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Shirts!

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J Write ... . don't call, particularly to points in other
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Be brief on all calls! Know what you want to say and
keep pencil and paper handy beside the telephone.

They're all the Go -
2.50 - 3.50 -5*00*-5.95

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ELEPHONE 'LINES today are carrying a bigger load than ever
'before, and they must be used efficiently to give maximum
service to the war effort. The nation's armed forces and war indus-
- 0 '31' * 1 ' *1. l* I1

I - 1111 A/Ith -the

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