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October 11, 1942 - Image 12

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-11

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PAGE FOUR.

THE ~MICHIG1(AN FDAILY

QTTITYA 1C1 11 Ifkdth

a AI Aa V A A \ N 1 y .J.

s1f Fu1 a lii. *K* alp 4N*;C

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Scene Of Annual Concerts

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a

ChIora~ lOYC

9

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20
DON COSSACK CHORUS

Cleveland Symphony Will Give
Concert Under Artur Rodzinski

...Serge Jaroff, Conductor

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29x

v

Orchestra To Make Fifth
Appearance Here Nov. 8
In 64th Annual Series
The Cleveland Symphony Orches-
tra under the baton of its distin-
guished conductor, Artur Rodzinski,
will present a concert Nov. 8 at Hill
Auditorium, as. a highlight of the
sixty-fourth annual Choral Union
Series
Ranking high among the musical
organizations of the world, the Cleve-
land Orchestra is now in its twenty-
fourtli season. In the course of its
growth to the high position it holds
today,. it. has iraveled widely over the
eatern half of the United States and
has given many concerts in Canada
and Cuba.
The coming concert will mark its
fifth appearance here.
A notable testimonial to the organ-
ization'sunflagging standards of per-
formance is the fact that season after.
season they have been reengaged in
the 'cities in which they have ap-
Piano Master
Josef Hofmann
To lay Here
Joef iofmann, "the greatest pian-
ist d our tm rs,"kasSamuel Chotzin-
oft oll theis New York Post and critics
ever,0were all him, will be presented
here; on Jan.. 18 at Hill Auditorium
as a'$ea ture of the, Choral Union Con-
cert i$erles.
In November, 1887, at the Metro-
politan Opera House in New York
City, Hofmann made his first ap-
pearance in this country as a child of
ten.',ven then he was hailed as a
musical phenomenon. Fifty years la-1
ter as a maan of sixty, he played hisa
Golden Jubilee concert to a packed1
house in the same auditorium. t
This man who is hailel as the3
greatest of living pianists was born
in Poland, but is American by adop-
tion, and \very proud of his citizen-
ship, his American wife, and threeC
typical American sons.
Hofmann who at the age of sixo
was aclaimed as the greatest musical.F
pro, since Mozart, puts disciplinea
as firstrequirement of art. "Het
who would become an artist musts
possi the single eye--have in view
thefingie goal. Every day demandse
its t611 of hours."
"|ut," Hofmann continues, "thereF
must be balance Of work and play- 1
otherwise one is in danger of dullingf
the bright edge of enthusiasm; andn
without enthusiasm the artist is lost."d
Hofmann himself is an expert me-n
chanic and proficient in most sports. N
However, in his mechanical work he h
must spare his hands so he employsw
an .assistant to help him with the
lathes and drills. His hands are un- a
usually small for a pianist, the fin- t
gers short, thick and spatulate. But m
they possess enormous latent power,
and, when clenched appear to be al- e
most twice their relaxed size, because s
of the protruding muscles. a
Remarkably efficient hands they p
are too, for not only can they crash a
out chords of thunderous power, or K
draw from the keys tones of great a
beauty, but at the dictates of his in- p
ventive genius, they make drawings c
of manifold contrivances ranging
from shock-absorbers for an automo- t
bile to an oil-burning furnace. H

peared. So great is the demand for
their concerts on tour that a fifth
week has been added to their custom-
ary four weeks of touring.
Largely responsible for the popu-
larity of the Cleveland Orchestra is
its conductor, Artur Rodzinski, who
is now in his ninth year as its leader.
There are few treasures of the orches-
tral repertory of the past or of the
present which remain unexplored by
Dr. Rodzinski's baton. His, skill 'in
assembling programs successful with
the most varied audiences is known
throughout America.
Dr. Rodzinski's eight seasons with
the Cleveland Orchestra have been
characterized by distingished
achievement. Taking:i a wholly new
lease on life, the orchestra has each-
ed such heights of? communicative
expression that it is accepted as one
of the great orchestras not only of
America but of the world.
Dr. Rodzinski is on of those con-
ductors who were invited to assist in
the celebration of the centennial sea-
son of the New York Philharmonic-
Symphony Orchestra--taking charge
of the famous organization for four
weeks in November and December,
1941.
At his disposal, Dr. Rodzinski has a
well drilled and responsive orchestra
of eighty-two virtuosos, ready and
eager to project his wishes. .The or-
chestra has traveled since its first
season. In twenty-three years it has
played 896 concerts in twenty-five
states.
Albert Spalding
To le Heard
Here Nov. 19
'The aristocrat of the violin,' Albert
Spalding, brings to the Choral Union
program November 19 the famous
violin, made by Joseph Guarnerius in
1755, that has attracted the attention
of connoisseurs for more than 100
years.
It was brought out of Italy by Tar-
isio, used by Vuillaume as a model,
has been owned by the Marquis de
Sear, the Comte d'Armaille, and by
Colonel Le Maistre.
In 1913 Spalding acquired this fam-
ous violin recognized by its very bold
F holes, rugged appearance, richness
and brilliancy of color and very deep
tone and has used it continuously
since that time.
Spalding, American born and train-
ed artist, has been a favorite visiting
artist abroad. He was first heard in
Paris at the age of sixteen and has
been honored by many command per-
formances by European royalty. A
member of the Aviation Corps abroad
during the first World War, Spalding
met Fiorello La Guardia, Mayor of
New York City. Later La Guardia was
his superior officer. In France, he
was awarded the Legion of Honor.
Spalding, clean-shaven, striking in
appearance, has done much to dispel
he old idea that a ranking muSician
nust be a long-haired foreigner.
Albert Spalding is practically an
qual virtuoso of the chafing-dish. He
ays there is an art to preparing food
nd gives us one of his favorite reci-
es entitled Strawberries flambes. To
quart of sugared strawberries add
Kirsch and brandy to taste. Heat over
slow fire about five minutes, then
our over vanilla ice cream. Add a
up of brandy and set aflame.
Season after season he travels over
he entire country on concert tours.
Terman Devries of the Chicago Her-

GLADYS SWARTHOUT

Mezzo-Soprano

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8,

ARTUR RODZINSKI, Conductor, and the
CLEVELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 19
ALBERT SPALDING Violinist
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3
ARTUR SCHpNAsBEL t
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor, and the
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
MONDAY, JANUARY 18
JOSEF HOFMANN . Pianist
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16
JASCHA HEIFETZ . Violinist
MARCH - OPEN DATE
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17
NELSON EDDY Baritone

All Concerts Begin

at 8:30 p.m.

E.W.T.

TICKETS

NOW

ON

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OVER

THE

-COUNTER

Every bay B eginning at 8:30 a m

eua'rotIN

MEMOR/1iAL'\

'rOWER

Ticket Prices Include Tax

Season

ITickets

$1320

$1100

"

$880
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