100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1942 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUVhDAY, OCT. 11, 19 ~

~~~1

Rf

I

I

IReligion, War To Be Discussed
The Religious Education Workshop Workshop will place its emphasis on
will begin its activities for the fall three principle lines of study this
semester at a meeting to be held from year. They are:
7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday at Lane Hall. 1. Religion and the War Period.
Under the direction of the Coun- This will involve a study of reports
selor in Religious Education, Dr. Ed- made to Congress on the subject.
ward W. Blakeman, the organization 2. A study of the declarations about
is open to any student who will en- war made by ecclesiastical bodies.
toll for at least a four week period. 3. Religion in Higher Education.
The reason for this four week period Under this general heading there will
is that the Workshop undertakes pro- be a consideration of religious coun-
Jects that usually require at least four seling, moral and spiritual effect of
weeks to.complete. Selective Service, and student pro-
According to Dr. Blakeman, the jects on world affairs.

M.

4& f

Craig Reports
On Foresters'
Camp Course
Robert Craig, secretary of the
School of Forestry and Conservation
and director of Camp Filibert Roth,
who returned from the camp last
week, reported a very successful sum-
mer season there.
The camp, located approximately
600 miles north of Ann Arbor just
inside the Michigan border near Wis-
consin in the Ottoman National For-
est, June 5 and closed September 25
after a fifteen week run.
The students receive fifteen hours
credit for their work done at the sum-
mer camp. During the course, they
receive instruction in forest adminis-
tration,-reconnaissance and fire pro-
tection. In this connection they twice
answered calls for volunteers and as-
sisted in putting out forest fires.
In addition to this, they were
trained in wild-life management, syl-
vies, which is the study of the char-
acteristics of individual trees, and
map-making.
Twenty students attended the fif-
teen week session this summer. They
were housed in small cabins, four
boys in each.
Because of the difficulty in obtain-
ing a physician, Prof. Craig acted as
general doctor and nurse.
Student assistants at the camp
were Robert Ohlman, Grad., Law-
rence Howard, "Grad., and Lee
Shames, Grad.
Foreign Group
To Stage Social
Wednesday Night
International Center, headquarters
of foreign students in the University,
will hold its annual open house as
a reception, 8 to 11 p.m. Wednesday.
This year it is sponsored by Prof. J.
Raleigh Nelson, director of the Cen-
ter and by the newly appointed Board
of Governors of the organization.
The primary purpose of the affair
is the presentation of an opportunity
for the advisers to foreign students
in the various colleges to meet and
become acquainted with these stu-
-ents and their friends.
In assistance at the refreshment
tables will be a committee of twelve
women, to be announced shortly.
Varsity Debaters
Will Hold Meeting
Tomorrow Night
The Varsity Men's Debate Team
will carry on intercollegiate debating
as in former years, director Arthur
Secord announced yesterday.
The topic this year deals with post-
war world organization. No definite
schedule oftdebates has been ar-
ranged as yet.
Squad members will participate in
debate clinics for high schools in var-
ious parts of the state. Plans have
also been made for them to speak for
the Ann Arbor Community Fund dur-
ing their fall drive.
The first general meeting will be
held Monday, Oct. 12 at 4 p. m. in
room 4203 Angell Hall. All returning
members and anyone interested in
trying out for the squad are urged to
attend.

i
i
I

1
A
i

i

i

Professor Back From China Speaks:

Surrendering Of U. S. Rights
In China Is Called Significant

a
ii
f
s
ei
of

A Campus
Sinoothiie.. .

The United States' willingness to
abolish her extraterritorial rights h
China "is the most significant ever
in a century in the relations of Chin;
and the United States," Esson M

.0
!t

,hould be recognized, Prof: Gale de-
;lared.
Asserting that Korea is "a neglect-
3d ally," Prof. Gale who has recently
returned from Chungking and India
on a mission for the Office of Coordi-
nator of Information said that recog-
nition of Korea would make possible
a nucleus about which the national-
istic Koreans could rally with the
"grim and determined" Chinese and
the rest of the United Nations.
The recovery of Burma "as an ave-
nue for the shipment of munitions to
China" was called a matter of "ex-
treme importance" by Prof. Gale. "It
is from China and with China that
the heart of the Japanese invasion
must be attacked," he said. "This can
only be done through the cooperation
of the United States and Great Brit-
ain with China."
Drawing on his knowledge of China
gained from living there many years,
Prof. Gale cited the Chinese peoples'
"courage and tenacity." There are "no
signs of weakening," he said.
Japanese bombings of the city of
Chungking have stopped since the
war began, he declared. He attributed
this slowing down of the Japs' war
machine to the action in the southern
Pacific and the presence of Gen.
Claire Chennault's Flying Tigers and
the American Air Force,

L
'? 1!
y wr
'w
'~
l
'!

SLIPS on a sweater n'
skirt and feels perfectly
comfortable for classes
AND for informal dates.
Our sweater collection in.
cludes shetlands, "ruffies"
and soft, soft wools.
From $3.95
.s. te've complete ac-
cessories, from belts to bags,
from ankle sox to eadker-
chief S.

The CAMPUS' SHOP

PROF. ESSON M. GALE
... he knows the (Chinese
Gale, Acting James Otis Murfin pro-
essor of political science said yester
day.
To follow up this first Americar
tep toward restoring the Chines
sense of independence and full sov
reignty", the provisional governmen
of Korea, now meeting in Chungking
Folk Songs Will Begin
Carillon Series Tonight

Subscribe to "The Michigan Doily" today!

n
e
t
r i
ar

SCAMPISH-
litter of se-

Left

With his Thursday series of con-
certs already begun, Prof. Percival
Price will present the first program
of his Sunday recitals at 7:15 p.m.
today with a group of folk songs
which have been arranged especially
for the carillon.
Prof. Price plans to play 16 con-
certs of music for the carillon on his
Sunday programs and to present for
his Thursday recital. compositions'
that have been written particularly
for the carillon. These latter pro-
grams will also begin at 7:15 p.m.
As part of the concert which will
be performed today, a group of coun-
try dance and gypsy songs will be
offered.
In order to, give students an oppor-
tunity to watch a carillon concert,
the Tower will be opened to them
every day this week at noon, and
Prof. Price will offer a short pro-
gram at this time.

. . Or the winsome appeal of
velveteen and lace, right, in sizes
9-15 at $12.95. RIGHT
Besides having glamour-appeal, our
dresses are perfect for final sorority
dinners, and League or Union dates
. . at $16.95 and $22.95-sizes
from 9.
DAZZLING ADDITIONS ...
To round off your ensemble we offer
a complete collection of accesories.

r ihe
'round the Corner an State

__________________________ _________________________ I

4

S li.
l l;

i AY GOOD
f . For afternoon teas and gay
evening parties this fall and all
through the winter. Dress it up
with an Eisenburg pin . . . exclu-
sive in Ann Arbor at Collins . .
or down with a tailored pin.
$16.95 $45

s

I
I
i
I
I

For Your Pursuit of Loveliness
$ :4
.95
f~
Rhyth m

-

i

i
'i

EXIRN

Delta Upsilon, Elec-
ted Best Dressed
Odin on Campus.
-*

I

WHY NOT GRAB THESE

when you buy dry cleaning?

IILUES

JIM KEHOE,'44

Goldman Bros. Sanitone Cleaning gives
you 3 big values at no extra cost!
1. EXTRA THOROUGH CLEANING. Unique Sari-
tone method penetrates to heart of fabric... removes more
soil, of more different kinds, than ordinary methods can.
2. EXTRA WEAR. Sanitoning restores finishing miter--
ials (such as used by textile mills) to make fabrics soft

n.
rv
,r,

and supple.

Makes garment feel new, last longer.

I

with the Sculptured Walstline

:./rousseaupreffY

slip

fit'

ing department
form-fit.

takes

extra time to restore

3. EXTRA CAREFUL FINISHING. To add to your
enjoyment in wearing your suit or dress, Goldman's fnish-

flatterng

topped by snow-drifIs of Vol type
lace and delicate embroidery. Fem.

-Iciai

I Ammmmmmlm

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan