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February 22, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE' SIX

TILE MICHIGAN DAILY

Heredity Tall
Will Be Given
By Dr. Snyder
Nationally Famous Scholar
Noted For Contributions
In Studies Of Genetics
One of the leading students of hu-
man genetics-Dr. Laurence H. Sny-
der of the Ohio State University
College of Medicine-will lecture on
"Heredity and Modern Life" at 8
p.m. Tuesday in Rackham Amphi-.
theatre.
Although Dr. Snyder may be ex-
pected to make reference to the ap-
plications of genetical knowledge in
medical affairs, the talk is intended
primarily for the general public. He
will clarify various of his points by
the use of lantern slides.-
The eminent scholar's chief con-
tributions to science have been large-
ly concerned with the inheritance of
human blood types and methods for
the analysis of human genetical data.
At present professor of zoology and
medical genetics at Ohio State, Dr.
Snyder recently delivered a series of
lectures to the three medical schools
in North Carolina. Since 1934 he
has served as chairman of the Com-
mittee on Human Heredity of the
National Research Council.
Dr. Snyder is the author of several
books, including "The Principles of
Heredity," and "Blood Grouping in
Relation to Legal and Clinical Medi-
cine."
The series of lectures which he de-
livered at the North Carolina schools
have also recently been compiled in
book form. Numerous of his articles
have been published in scientific
magazines.
Wesleyan Guild To Hear
BrasharesSpeak Today
The problem "Patriotism-Traitor
or Christian" will be discussed by Dr.
Charles W. Brashares before the
Wesleyan Guild at 6 p.m. today in
the Methodist Church parlors.
The Graduate Group will also
meet at 6 p.m. in the recreation room
to discuss the subject "Are You Let-
ting the War Get You Down?"
Following the meeting a joint sup-
per and fellowship hour will be held
at 7 p.m. in the basement.
Air Base Will Be Built
WASHINGTON, Feb. 21. - (AP) -
Senator Brown (Dem.-Mich.) said
today the Navy had directed the O.
W. Burke Company, Detroit, to pro-
ceed with construction of a Naval
Reserve aviation base at Grosse Ile,
pending final signing of a $1,513,700
contract.
r..
9 5
« F
FOUR WAYS TO
WINTER BEAUTY

by
helena rubinstein

White-Clad Ski Troops Pass In Parade At Fort Brady

Further War
Effort Urged
Of Fraternities
New Resolutions Adopted
As Alumni Conference
Asks Redoubled Effort
(Continued from Page 1)
Connable of Delta Kappa Epsilon,
Herbert G. Watkins of Trigon, H. H.
Upton of Phi Gamma Delta, Robert
Sinclair of Delta Tau Delta, Henry
Newman of Sigma Nu, Paul Kempf
of Phi Kappa Psi, M. W. Wheeler of
Beta Theta Pi, Dean Titus of Delta
Upsilon and Arthur Aiton of Delta
Kappa Epsilon.
The entire resolution as it was
passed by the Committee is as fol-
lows:
Whereas: At this moment when
every American is called upon to do
his utmost to help win this war, the
fraternity group, both alumni and ac-
tive, have, as in all past wars in
which their nation has been involved,
joined wholeheartedly in a maximum
endeavor to further the national ef-
fort;
And Whereas: The fraternity as
a constructive and vital part of Uni-
versity life feels that it can, as in
previous national emergencies, ren-
der effective service to the University
and to the nation;
Be It Resolved: That it is the sense
of the University of Michigan Inter-
fraternity Alumni Conference that
the fraternities should now move for-
ward with redoubled effort to place
themselves on a complete war basis,
with respect to morale and manage-
ment, and by so doing, set a high
example.
V-1, V-7 To Enlist
MoreCollegeaMen
(Continued from Page 1)

University Offers
Men Preparation
For Life In Army
(Continued from Page 1)
legitimately be called 'defense cours-
es,'" he said, "because they have
been so specified by the officials of
the armed forces.
He also pointed out that up to this
time the Army has specifically in-
sisted that they do not want another
Student Army Training Corps such
as was organized during the last war.
They would much rather give the sol-
diers their basic training either in
ROTC units or in actual army camps.
There is a possibility, however, that
some form of drill may be included-
in the physical training program; but
it would be supervised entirely by
civilians.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY-22; 192
Songs Of Freedom
To Be Sung Today
The presentation of "Battle Songs
of Freedom." the Ann Arbor Civic
Music Association's 1942 vehicle,
scheduled for 4 p.m. today in Hill
Auditorium, will mark the initial
participation of University students
in this annual event.
John Ebelke. Grad.. Sheldon Fink-
elstein, '42, and John Craig, '42, of
Prof. Kenneth C. Rowe's advanced
playwriting course, wrote the final
version of a continuity for the patri-
otic program, after classmates had
done preliminary research and writ-
ing.
The songs will be sung by the local
church choirs and the lyric men's
choir, accompanied by the Civic Or-
chestra. All students are invited to
attend and join the audience in the
singing.

Camouflaged in white, ski troops in training at Fort Brady at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich., passed in review
before commanding officers. At lower right are two snow plows powered with plane motors and propellors,
being tested over Michigan terrain prior to shipment for army use in Alaska.
City Of Shacks SpringsU In Wake,
Of Newly-Completed Bomber Plant

for Showers ...
for Weddings ,..
Linen gifts are always in order! But be-
cause such merchandise can be imported
no longer, we suggest you stock up now
before these goods become increasingly
scarce.
GAGCE LINEsN SHOP
10 NICKI-Ls ARCADE "Alivays Reasonably Priced"

(This is the fifth in a series of arti-
cles on the problems of housing an
influx of laborers in the areas around
willow Run.)
(Special to The Daily)
By ROBERT MANTHO
PLATT, Feb. 21.-Located strategi-
cally on Packard Road halfway be-
tween Ann Arbor and Ypsilanti, this
little city is a hang-over from prohi-
bition and until recently was the den
for "businessmen" with a shady past
behind them-but it has sprouted
from a tluiet population of 200 to one
that promises to reach a peak of 20001
in a few months as out-of-state lab-
orers seeking work in the huge bomb-
er plant at Willow Run move in to
take up homesteads.
Shacks Spring Up
The shacks have begun to go up.
Workers are paying $45 and $50 down
for mouse-trap lots and are busy
putting a roof over their heads as
fast as they can.
Today a trip through this section
of Platt is like walking through one
of the pre-Roosevelt "Hoover Cities."
In the little city-which was not even
listed as a corporated town in the last
census-can be seen tiny store-box
shacks with tar paper nailed on the
outside and a hole punched through
the roof. Glass has been slapped on
to serve for windows and the doorway
is so low you have to stoop to enter.
Pollution Is Prevalent
Septic tanks have been put in the
front and 25-foot wells have been dug
in the back. These feed on ground
water which is saturated with the
pollution from the septic tanks and
Robert Cameron, county sanitation
engineer, estimates that 25 percent
of the wells are already unsanitary.
(The water table in the region
around Platt is high and wells do not
have to be dug very deep to strike
ground water.)
Dr. Otto K. Engelke, director of the
county health department, and his
staff of hard-pressed assistants are
frankly worried about the sanitation
problem developing here.
The Ann Arbor Sewage Disposal
Plant stands just across the Huron
River from Platt. What is needed is
the extension of a collecting line on
the Ann' Arbor side of the river to

run into a main line on the Platt
side. This would take care of the
sewage disposal and at the same time
eliminate use of the septic tanks
which are potentially dangerous.
Platt has two primary schools with-
in two miles of each other-Platt
School and the Stone School. Over
150 grade-school-age children are be-
ing herded into the former, which is
a one-room country school. The
Stone School is somewhat larger and
has utilized a framework building
nearby as an extension but it is still
unable to meet the needs of the 150
children attending classes there.
Schools Are Crowded
In Ypsilanti there are two schools,
Spencer and Rawsonville-both about
a mile from the bomber plant-which
are so over-crowded now that the
teachers can't be paid. The influx of
migrants has made it necessary for
these schools to hire additional teach-
ers and there are no funds with
which to pay their services.
(The laborers who are sending
their children to school are out-of-
state and have not established resi-
dence in the state. Thus, they cannot
be taxed for the schooling their chil-
dren are getting at the expense of
the state of Michigan.)
The educational problem is admit-
arri ag Institute
To HoldMeetings
Sponsored by the University Ex-
tension Service, the third annual
Marriage and Family Life Institute
will hold a five-day meeting Monday
through Friday at the new Horace
Rackham Memorial Building in De-
troit.
Designed principally to help young
married people with their; problems,
the program will be headlined by Dr.
Paul Poponoe, well-known expert on
the family and Director of the Amer-
ican Institute of Family Relations.
Among the problems which he will
discuss is the education of children
in wartime.
Cooperating with the Extension
Service in the sponsorship of this
program are the Detroit Public Li-
brary and the Merrill-Palmer School.

tedly serious now. It is going to be
worse. Where are the school facilities
to be found which must take care ofj
the added burden once the bomber
plant begins to roll planes off the
assembly lines? How will the schools
be financed?
Funds Are Needed
If no community is planned to in-
clude Platt, the solution seems to be
that of building a centralized town-
ship school. To do this, funds are all-
important. But the Washtenaw
County Board of Supervisors thinks
that the Willow Run project is
strictly a matter for the townships
in the eastern part of Michigan to
cope with.
Now that the emergency is squarely
before them, the responsible local
agencies realize they have left every-
thing go too long and are trying to
make the best of a bad situation.
The fact remains that the county
board of supervisors has the potential
power of controlling the shacks and
shanties that are springing up. The
board only need exercise the power
at hand. But it is sitting tight, wait-
ing for further developments.

::
ks
t
e .
".
/ ..:

from the original V-1 class will be
selected for flight training after pass-
ing the Navy comprehensive test and
an Aviation Cadet physical examina-
tion during their second sophomore
semester. These men will be ordered
to flight trainingwhen needed after
completing two years' academic work.
The remaining 45,000 men per year
will be allowed to finish two years of
college before going on active duty at
the, Naval Training Station. Com-
pletion of this work will mean assign-
ment to the Fleet.
College students now enlisted in
V-1, V-5 and V-7 will continue under
present arrangements, the Navy also
announced. The new program will see
no change in authorized strength or
number of units in the current Naval
ROTC organization.

ti

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SMOOTH YOUR SKIN every
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KEEP SOf# LIPS un-
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Rubinstein Lip-
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by day, Red Velvet at
night. 1.00 to 2.00.
GUARD YOUR HANDS from
chapping, roughness
with fragrant APPLE
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THERE'S ONE FOR DAY, AND ONE FOR NIGHT
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FOR WORK, FOR PLAY, THROUGHOUT THE DAY,
THERE'S A LIFE TO GIVE YOU GLAMOUR.
HOW ALL THE GIRLS WILL ENVY YOU,

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