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April 30, 1942 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T IV MIC:HIIAN VXII

TR'UPSD.,iY; APRTL 10; 1W

TI MC GN1VTT HUSAY ARL G014

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS,

May 20 to May 26, 1942

Time of Exercise Time of Examination
it 8:00 Friday, May 22 2-4
it 9:00 Wednesday, May 20 2-4
MONDAY )it 10:00 Friday, May 22 8-10
at 11:00 Thursday, May 21 10:30-12:30
t 1:00 Monday, May 25 2-4
at 2:00 Wednesday, May 20 8-10
it 3:00 Thursday, May 21 8-10
at 8:00 Tuesday, May 26 8.10
at 9:00 Thursday, May 21 2-4
TUESDAY at 10:00 Saturday, May 23 8-10
Tat 11:00 Saturday, May 23 2-4
at 1:00 Tuesday, May 26 10:30-12:30
at 2:00 Saturday, May 23 10:30-12:30
at 3:00 Monday, May 25 10:30-12:30

SPECIAL

PERIODS

:I

German 1, 2, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32.
Music 32.
Zoology 1
Botany 1..............
Music 2.
Speech 31, 32 .
French 1, 2, 31, 32, 51, 52,
61, 62, 91, 92, 153
Political Science 1, 2, 51, 5
,English 1, 2.
Psychology 31 ..
Economics 51, 52, 54,
Sociology 51
Physics 25.

.. Friday, May 22
Friday, May 22
Friday, May 22
Tuesday, May 26
Tuesday, May 26
Tuesday, May 26
Wednesday, May 20
Wednesday, May 20
2 ..Monday, May 25
Wednesday, May 20
Wednesday, May 20
Monday, May 25
Thursday, May 21
Friday, May 22

10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
2:00- 4:00
10:30-12:30
10:30-12:30
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00
10:30-12:30
8:00-10:00
8:00-10:00

Honor Work
Interviews
To Be Held
Designed to develop critical and
analytical abilities in students, the
Degree Program for Honors in Liberal
Arts is now accepting applicants to
the program.
Students interested in taking the
course, which has as its main purpose
the provision of standards for living,
will be interviewed from 3 to 4:30
p.m. tomorow in Room 1204 Angell
Hall.
Four students studying "Recent
Trends in Social Science" under the
tutelage of Prof. Mischa Titiev, of
the anthropology department, are do-
ing work illustrative of that carried
on under the honors program in three
fields-science, social science and lit-
erature.
Emphasizing the fact that students
are urged to express their own opin-
ions and are never bullied into ac-
cepting ideas, Professor Titiev as-
serted that the purpose of the course
was to study trends in social sciences
by developing the modern back-
ground through investigation of
works since Compte, and by analyzing
the generalized fields of sociology,
social psychology and cultural an-
thropology.
New tendencies are stressed in the
course of study, and factors, such as
the tendency in sociology to reduce
problems to mathematical formulas,
are discussed.
Senate To Hold
MeetingToday
Administrative Plans Set
For Discussion Topic
The new student senate will take
another step in its organization when
it holds a meeting at 4 p.m. today in
the Union to discuss plans for setting
up its administrative branch.
The administrative organization of
the senate hasbeen set up toput into
practice the decisions of the nine-
man policy-forming branch, which is
elected by the campus at large. The
administrative branch will be or-
ganized in approximately the same
way as the Union and Daily staffs,
consisting of freshman, sophomore
and junior staffs and headed by a
senior administrator. As in the other
organizations, appointments to jun-
ior and senior positions will be made
each spring.
All students interested in working
on the administrative branch of the
senate are urged to attend today's
meeting, it was emphasized by Wil-
liam F. Ager, '43, president pro tem.
A committee has also been appointed
to report on the new constitution of
the senate at the meeting.
The date of appointments for the
coming school year has not as yet
been determined, Ager explained, but
more specific plans are expected to
result from today's meeting.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

'

POCTURE

N-EWVS

.I

I.

r'

M A D E T 0 M E A S U R E F O R A B 0 M B I N C-At the Midland Army Flying School in Texas, there's this bomb dump where
100-pound practice bombs used by U.S. Army bombardier cadets.on their training flights are loaded. Here, the bombs get 90 pounds of
sand and five pounds of powder inserted at the fin end of projectile. This school is one of the world's largest training centers for bom-
bardiers. and the bombing range covers an area about 80 miles in diameter. Cadets are sturdy fellows, 18 to 26 years old.

314-
17,18 9 IO 11
12 t3 14 Is 18 17 is
r 19 d 21 2- 23 + 25
1 f
.r

GREYHOUND TERMINAL
116 WEST HURON STREET
Phone 2-5511

GREYHOUND
LINES

REM EM B E R?-Few traces
of his recent grave illness remain
on the broad face of Babe Ruth,
king of swat, who's recovered
from his pneumonia attack.

S P R I N C C A R 0 L-Carol Jean Kirby, 8, grins happily from
a frame of white Iris, in full spring bloom for the third annual iris
show at the Hollywood Garden club in California. There were
thousands of flowers on display.

R E P O R T-Recent new photo
of Gen. George C. Marshall, chief
of staff of the U.S. Army, shows
him at the White House, for a
report to F.D.R. on his con-
ferences in Britain.

#44
FARMS, like factories, are being converted: Instead of produc-
ing for the market they are producing for war.
To wiN a war, food and fiber are as important as steel, and
tremendous quotas have been set up for 1942 farm production:
More than a hundred billion pounds of milk, more than four
billion dozen eggs, nearly a hundred million hogs, more vege-
tables than ever before.
STHIS hattle of nroduetion. our Farm Service Division stands

TURNCOAT-Pierre Laval, new
power behind Vichy's aging De-
tain, is reportedly so crafty that he
can spell his own name backwards
without anyone knowing the dif-
ference.

" . ' -- :->- -' ' ?ka: '"aa....aatw _M J C'vW.'' BGJF.... MIN 0Y. ' : "l 4::'". ,.- "tame . . ...,...". ..... W ::S'

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