100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 28, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TRnE

PORTFOLIO
" Editor's Swan Song
* Greeting To The New Staff
By HAL WILSON
Daily Sports Editor

FINAL columnar efforts always fall
into the same pattern. In the
first graph retiring sports editors de-
cry sentimentality. In the second
they plunge immediately into a sea
of it,
This is the second graph-and I
am sentimental tonight. Not the
dripping, maudlin, tear-jerking
type of sentiment. Not that at all.
But there stands out a sincere
regret that it is all over. After
tonight the book will be closed
This column will be relegated to
the southeast corner of the Publi-
cations Building-the Daily mor-
gue-wherein repose its lofty pred-
ecessors, the Bill Reeds, the Pete
Lisagors, the Bud Benjamins.
REMAINING are the memories, the
vivid recollections of the past
four years at the University of Michi-
gan, the happiest of my life. They
stem from the rich associations with
the publications gang, the coaching
staff, the hundreds of athletes, with
Michigan tradition itself.
Remaining are the memories of
the Bill Watsons, the Jim Raes, the
Tom Harmons, the Dick Wake-
fields. The athletic trips-to Min-
neapolis for that rain-soaked 7-6
heartbreaker, to Columbia, to Illi-
nois, to Northwestern, to grid-
crazed Columbus, to Des Moines
for the famed Drake Relays, to
Purdue, to Chicago, down South
with the baseball team--and on
and on and on.
THE PAST FOUR YEARS have
seen this University experience
a remarkable gridiron renaissance.
Under the coaching wizardry gen-
erated by Herbert O. Crisler and his
highly capable aides, Michigan moved
in high gear from a succession of sev-
eral lean years into the fourth great
era of Wolverine football fortunes.
Since that day four years ago when
five thousand eager victory-starved
students poured into Hill Auditorium
to hear their new coach, Fritz Cris-
ler, declare with firm determination:
"This will be the fightingest team you
have ever seen," the Wolverines have
swept to25victories and two ties in
their last 32 games against the na-
tion's toughest competition.
When Fritz Crisler came to
Michigan he was established as a
good coach, a very good coach.
Today after four years here he is
a truly great one. There was the
night last winter when Ed Frutig,
ace Wolverine end under Crisler
for three years, ventured the state-
ment: "I knew that Fritz is a mar-
velous coach, but I never really
realized how limitless his talents
are until I finished at Michigan.
I went on to play under Bierman
and Kerr in the East-West game,
under Snavely in the All-Star game
and under Curly Lambeau with
the Green Bay Packers. But Fritz
has them all beat in every way."
BUT far more than this. Crisler is
a great administrator. He is a
leader-a policy-maker. No man in
the nation's collegiate athletic circles
today holds opinions more respected,
more highly valued. If you doubt,
name another. Crisler stands at the
top.
Michigan has many other fine
coaches. To single a few out would
be unfair. Errors of omission would
be as injudicious as errors of com-
mission. Suffice it to say merely that
Michigan is fortunate to be repre-
sented by as finely-rounded and cap-

able a group of coac hin talent as
can be found at any institution in the
entire country.
And now the athletes. For the
most part they are a great bunch.
Most part is the proper phrase-
for a very few, unfortunately, are
not. They are not worth the space
it would take to discuss them. The
majority are swell guys, good com-
petitors who pour all their energy
into the job before them. To say
more would be redundant.
THERE is a lot more to athletics
than merely what the catcher
tells the pitcher and what the quar-
terback says in the huddle. It is tied
up in the academic and psychological
side of the situation. But final col-
umns are far inadequate a place to
deal with this phase.
Through this channel-which is
serving as a catch-all for all dis-
jointed thoughts tonight-I'd like to
express my appreciation to everyone
with whom I've worked at The Daily
for their fine cooperation, and es-
pecially to my staff for its unflagging
spirit and unselfish effort throughout
the year.
So much for the goodbye. Now
for a brief hello. I'm sure Bud Ien-I
del and Mike Dann, you who will
head the sports staff for the com-
ing year, will turn in a capable job,
a very capable job. You probably
won't realize just how important
your job is until you get ready to
leave. You are the final word in
campus athletics. You are at once
a sports analyst, a critic, a booster
and all-around interpreter.
You will feel perhaps, and rightly
so, that a public performer is sub-
ject to fair and honest criticism.
But be sure it is fair and honest.
Remember a boost is worth a thou-
sand knocks. You have it in your
power to make or break athletic
teams or individuals. Use it dis-
creetly and wisely and always to
the best interests of the University.
THERE'LL be times when you'll b-
asked to withhold publication of
certain facts or stories. And these
are tremendously difficult times
when your journalistic conscience
will struggle with your desire to see
Iuman feelings spared. Right now
I could disclose facts never before
publicized which would perhaps rock
several elements in the athletic ad-
ministration. They would make ex-
cellent reading. They would be the
truth. But the ill effects therefrom
would outweigh the advantages to be
gained fromh journalistic expose. You
will have similar probles ti face.
Judge them with all the foresight and
wisdom at your disposal.
Above all, be fair. Be represcu-
tative. Give an accurate picture of
University athletics as a whole.
Do not play up certain groups to
the exclusion of others. I have
purposely skirted the entire war-
time problem. It is bound to make
your task more difficult. Face its
various phases as they arise. Good
luck and thanks again to everyone.
This is about all.

Baseball
Golfers Shine
In Third Meet
Michigan Gains First Win
By healing__Siartais
In scoring their first victory of
the yet young season, the Wolverine
golf squad looked very impressive as
it took the measure of the Michi-
gan State linksmen by a score of
17-7 Saturday.
Having only one week of warm
weather during which to practice for
the Kentucky and Ohio State match-
es, the varsity was far from midsea-
son form in those matches. It seems,
however, that the southern trip and
the added week in which to get in
shape was just what Ray Courtright's
charges needed to start things rolling.
Bob Fife Stars
In the match against State every-
one with the exception of Captain
John Leidy, who shot an even 80,
carded scores in the seventies. Bob
Fife, medalist with a one over par
73, was by far the most improved
golfer of the lot.
Dave Osler's 76 was his best round
so far this season, and if he contin-
ues the good work he will be a con-
stant threat in any' match. Even at
that, Dave had several bad holes
when he got himself into difficulty in
addition to three-putting three
greens.
Smith Gets 74
Ben Smith had a little tough luck
and his 74 might easily have been a
sub-par 70 with a few lucky breaks
going his way. Leidy also had a cou-
ple of bad holes. Usually a late start-
er, John has come along much faster
this year and Courtright expects him
to gain many valuable points for the
Wolverine cause.
Phil Marcellus looked extremely
good in shooting a 77, while three
other newcomers to the team-Chan
Simonds, Bill Courtright, and Bill
Stewart-scored 78's.
, ,
I-M To HolAd Links
tlotii'ieysSatuw(ay
The annual I-M Golf Tourneys1
make their one day appearance Sat-
urday with approximately 320 en-
trants expected to compete. All in-
tramural divisions will be repre-
sen ted--fraternity, graduate, resi-
dence halls, independent, and faculty,
and each team will enter five men.
Play begins at 7:30 in the morningR
and foursomes will be sent out about
every seven minutes if possible, the
last leaving around 4:30.
Tn order to arrange the foursomes
as evenly as possible all team en-
trants will be numbered in order of
importance and allocated accord-
ingly. The four best individual scores
wil be taken to make 1Ip the team
All entries for this meet mi st have
their blanks in to the Sports Build-
ing by 6:00 tomorrow evening.
An added incentive to entrants is
the presentation of a gold medal to
the one making the longest drive of
the clay from the first tee. Trophies
will be awarded to winners in each
of the respective I-M divisions.
All matches will be played off re-
gardless of weather conditions.

quad

Conquers

Varsity Hits Four Home
Runs In Easy Trium ph

Dick Savage Stars
Chamberlain,

In Relief Role, Socks Itom icRun;
Holman, While Also Coiiiiect

By BOB SHOPOFF
YPSILANTI, April 27-Michigan's
powerful baseball team teed off on
three Michigan Normal pitchers for
four home runs this afternoon at
Briggs Park which aided the Wolver-
ines in winning an easy 13-4 victory.
The Wolverines had little trouble
taking their fifth consecutive win
after their batters found the range
of the short fences of the Teachers'
j park.= Coach Ray Fisher threw 16
players into the fray and they col-
lected a total of 12 hits to completely
swamp the Hurons.
Dick Savage Stars
Coupled with the slugging of the
Michigan hitters was the excellent
relief pitching of Dick Savage. Dick
hurled five complete innings allow-
ing only three hits and no runs. He
was credited with the victory, his
first of the season. He also hit one
of the homers.
Normal scored first in the game
as Capt. John Shada started with a
triple off the pitching of Don Smith,
Michigan's first pitcher. After Char-
lie Oxley grounded out from Bud
Chamberlain to Art Bergesen, Char-
Michigan's baseball team meets
Michigan State this afternoon at
4 p.m. at Ferry Field. Coach Ray
Fisher will start Irv "Pro" Boim
for the Wolverines.
les Nemeth successfully worked the
squeeze play totscore Shada. Marion
Henry flied out to Don Holman in
left field, but Alan Hutchins dropped,
a single in center, Nemeth going to!
third.
With the double steal on, Nemeth
was safe at home when Capt. George
Harms dropped the ball as Nemeth's
cleats gashed him in the right hand.
Harms had to leave the game and
was replaced by Bud Jessop. GeorgeI
will be ready tomorrow.I
Shower Of Homers
In the fourth frame Michigan tied
the tilt up as the home runs started.
After Wayne Christenson singled,
slugging Paul White caught hold of
one of Ed Gilday's pitches and blast-
ed it over the right field fence, 360
feet away, to drive in Christenson
ahead of him.
The Hurons came right, back in
their half of the fourth to score their
last two runs when Clair Krawczak,
center fielder, hit the hardest homer
of the day as the ball cleared the,
center field fence by thirty fIct. Bob
Harvey, who had walked, scored on
the hit. This was all for Smith.
Besides stopping the Hurons, Dick

Savage was plenty busy with the bat.
Inthe fifth inning he led off with
a solid homer over the center field
fence. Davey Nelson, who was hit-
ting the ball hard all day, tripled to
the corner in left field and scored

Drake Results
Please Coach
Thiin ciads' Balance Makes
Keni DohertyOptimnistic
Michigan's track team garnered
only one first place at the annual
Drake Relays this past weekend, but
Coach Ken Doherty returned to Ann
Arbor in his most optimistic mood of
the year.
The genial cinder mentor was well
pleased at the team performance as
a whole, and he made the broad
statement that he was now more
hopeful about the Wolverine pros-
pects than at any other time this
season.
In all, the Maize and Blue thin-
clads captured one first, one second,
two thirds, five fourths, and two
fifths while placing in every univer-
sity relay on the program.
Best Michigan Event
According to Doherty, Michigan's
most outstanding single display of
speed came in Friday's sprint medley
relay, where the Wolverine quartet of
Bob Ufer, Capt. Al Piel, Len Alkon
and Dave Matthews finished second
to Oklahoma A&M's record-breaking
outfit. The Aggies zoomed around
the track in the world-record time
of 3:23, with Michigan just seven-
tenths of a second behind them for1
a new Wolverine standard. Ufer
streaked his 440 leg in 47.5, the best
of his life. Piel and Alkon followed
with identical 21.5 220 yard stints,
and Matthews anchored the crew
with the fastest 880 of his career,
1:53.2.
Perennial Michigan Balance
With balance its greatest forte, the
Doherty-coached machine took first
place only in the two-mile relay. The
winning time was 7:43.2, better than
a 1:56 average half-mile for the
quartet of Johnny Kautz, John Rox-
borough, Matthews and Ufer.
The lone casualty was quarter-
miler Buel Morley. Spiked on his left
calf at the start of his 440, the lanky
junior courageously poured it on to
turn in his best performance, 49.6.
Morley's injury makes it improbable
that he will be available against Illi-
nois this Saturday.
NOTICE
Checrleading practice will- be
held behind the Union at 4:30
every night this week,
-Lincoln Aldrich,
Head Cheerleader

MICHIGAN AB
Nelson, cf. ...... 5
Holman, If......4
Cartmill, If. .....1
Robinson, ss, .... 4
Erpelding, ss .... 0
Chamberlain, 3b.. 5
Christenson, 2b. . 2
Stenberg, 2b. .. .. 2
White, rf........ 3
Bergesen, 1b .... 4
Harms, c.........0
eJessp), C . .. .. . . .4
Smith, p........1
Savage, p. ...... 3
Higgins, 3b .... 1
Parr, p. ......... 0
Totals .......39

R
2
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
3
0
0
2
0
2
0
0
13

H
3
2
0
Q
0
1
1
0
2
0
0
0
2
0
0
12

0
3
1
0
2
1
3
2
1
1
10
0
3
0
0
0
0
27

Burst Of Power!

A
1
0
0
1
0
2
1
0
0
0
1
3
3
3
0
0
15

Hurons,

13-4

E
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2

MICH. NORMAL AB

Shada, 2b.
Oxley, lf.......
Nemeth, lb..
Henry, rf.......
Hutchins, 3b. .
Piche, ss.....
Harvey, c. .....
Krawczak, cf. ..
Hobbs, p. ......
Gilday, p. ......
Carakostas, p. ..

4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
1
2
1

I
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0

H
3
0
2
1
1
0
0
2
0
1
0
10

O
3
4
14
2
2
0
2
1
0
0
0
27

A
3
0
0
0
2
3
0
0
2
2
1
13

E
0
1
U
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2

Totals..... .35 4
Score by Innings:
MICHIGAN ......0..,00
MICH. NORMAL . 200

223 141-13
200 000- 4

DON HOLMAN
with the tying rin when Don Hol-
man hit a long fly to right.
Michigan was given a couple runs
in the sixth inning as Normal's pitch-
er lost his range of the plate. Five
walks and a single gave Michigan
three tallys.
Five More Runs
A single by White in the seventh
and a two-base error plus Jessop's
long fly added another run, to the
Wolverines' total. In the eighth Hol-
man and Chamberlain both knocked
the ball out of the park, each time
the hit coming with a man on base.
After Holman's blow, Gilday took
cover and left, 1e pitching duties to
Ken Carakostas.
In the final frame Michigan scored
one run as ,Jessop smacked a double
to left field and scored on Nelson's
third hit of the day.

Tigers Release Meyer;
Open Series With Hose
DETROIT, April 27. -(P)- The
Detroit Tigers today released second
baseman L. D. (Dutch) Meyer under
option to Buffalo of the Internation-
al League. Hs is subject to immedi-
ate recall.
The Tigers, only a half-game out:
of first place due to sume excellent
pitching and timely hitting from a
flock of recruits, opened the Eastern
swing tomorrow at Boston.
Tommy Bridges was the Detroit
pitching choice for the opening game
against the Red Sox.
Chicago ... 000 210 000 01-4 11 1
Cincinnati .. 000 002 010 00-3 8 2
Bithorn, Erickson and Hernandez;
Vandermeer and Lamanno.
LET'S SPRUCE UP!
Try one of our Scalp Treatments -
Facials - Personality Hair. Styles.
5 Barbers - No waiting, air-cooled.
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Between State and Mich. Theatre

s

pring

1

Ili 1

9p' ELLBONHDE D
HOUSE
,PADIT
0 IPRINT

* good Itagrordla!'
to p roduce IA
.nperlo r YP ' beerat
portioningq,,.l ,mportafl r,,th
port I ~ w,& U Lght Lager

Its Wonderful!
"I
7A.1
-7

5

iwhat maIeCSuW, 4W
A L L "~ ~ tN b e e .. . so jjf f c r e '4

C'te a4
~~tt
a
Re a.
PAT,
We fix orders
to tok out,
too.

1

utmostI's ROS b dt ,.oo l
Which yield the u~I~~pl4 rh
ilavor With floe.ito e't ratca 0aoi

I

A I-M altul'ost 11 " ", - ",-

4

_ .., ~l-iwatif4. Of all "tiOY'

I

I

t

Try BOYDELL'S 2-COAT SYSTEM
[or the fiast coat uie o kt Pd Fintl
Primer; itspreak s eenly with fal U
coverage. Then apply a se ond coat-
this one of Boydell Bonded House
aint-for a smooth, durable inishl as good, if not
better, than three c(ots of ordlinary paints,.f i is a
tried-and-proven system that gives good reults!

O rrn, Wth , e jquitI td with the itrue
h t jl4 ' avor f thiSau

An gsdves yo wthft
Arid so doe,--) smoke with ornc of ouw

I

pipes,

Pick out a new pipe from our

choice collection and add
Spring smoking enjoyment.

to your

1

I

I

U ~ v^ EaII1 Fhk E3FV, I AFb 'iIA A F DE d*I

i i

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan