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February 15, 1942 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-02-15

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TIE MICHIiGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

Spanish Group
To Hear Colby
Talk On Brazil
Spanish Instructor Finds
Similarities In Spanish,
PortugueseLanguages
That Carmen Miranda is not re-
sponsible for all the increased in-
terest in Portuguese will be proved
by Mr. Leroy Colby of the Spanish
department at 4:15 p.m. Friday in
Alumni Memorial Hall in the third
lecture of La Sociedad Hispanica's
1941-42 series.
Few students, Colby asserts, real-
ize that Brazil is a Portuguese-
speaking nation and stands alone in
that capacity in South America
Stressing the need for a better rela-
tionships with Brazil, Colby will point
out the advantages of knowing the
Portuguese tongue.
Following the title of the lecture,
"Some Similarities Between Portu-
guese and Spanish," Colby will de-
scribe the points of similarity and
difference between the two lan-
guages. A point of primary consider-
ation is the fact that any person
speaking Portuguese can understand
spoken Spanish and vice versa.
The main body of the lecture will
be given in English, but linguistic
comparisons will be made by citing
examples in both languages. It is
not necessary for students wishing to
attend the lecture to understand ei-
ther Portuguese or Spanish. Special
attention will be paid to emphasizing
the ways in which students will be
able to utilize these languages.
Federa A ssistance
For Colleges Asked
At ChicagoMeeting
Back on' campus following a one-
day meeting of a sub-committee of
land grant colleges in Chicago, Prof.
Harlow J. Heneman, executive di-
rector of the University War Board,
said yesterday that proposals had
been forwarded to the U. S. Com-
missioner of Education suggesting
possible methods of federal financial
aid to colleges.
The University is not a land grant
college, but Prof. Heneman attended
the session because topics discussed
were pertinent to local acceleration
problems.
Both Prof. Heneman and President
Ruthven attended a meeting of the
Wartime Commission of the Federal
Office of Education on the previous
day to discuss plans of expediting
the training of personnel in fields
where shortages exist. Problems in
medical, dental, physics and all types
of engineering schools were dis-
cussed.

Stars To Appear In Ballet

Tomorrow

Perkins Would Give Governor
Four Year Term, Urges Unity

Coed Curfew
Even Worse

A sweeping revision of the Michi-
gan state constitution, giving the
governor a four-year term and
strong, centralized powers and mak-
ing other changes was urged yester-
day by Dr. John A. Perkins, of the
political science department.
Dr. Perkins advanced his recom-
mendations in an article prepared for
the University's Quarterly Alumni
Review.
The article called for quick enact-
ment of these changes:
1. Centralization of executive
power in the governor, together with
the power to appoint or remove all
state officers except the lieutenant-
governor and possibly the auditor
general.f
2. Legislative reapportionment-
"to insure the will of the popular ma-
jority."
3. Unification of State courts,
partly by putting the jurisdiction now
held by justices of the peace in the
hands of salaried trial justices ap-
pointed by the circuit judges.
Constitution Is 'Out-Moded'
"Our present constitution in sev-
eral respects is as out-moded as the
rag-time, brass-rail era in which it
was written," Dr. Perkins declared.
"Twentieth century business has
outgrown 18th century constitutional
theory. The Federal-State pattern
Shas changed more adically in the
past 15 years than at any time since
the Civil War. The charge of inef-
ficiency has been leveled at the states,
and if the tentacles of the Federal
octopus are to be loosened, reform
and modernization must reinvigorate
the commonwealths, making them
efficient."
Responsibility Is Unfixed
Urging new powers for the gover-
nor, Dr. Perkins attacked the present
system "which distributes executive

responsibility among six elective of- - urinu W ar I
ficers who are virtually independent
of the governor and responsible only
to the party which nominates them." Today's University coed, hysteric-
"A tour-year term," he argued, ally screaming over a clipped Friday
"should supplant the present two niglt curfew, looks like a pampered
year tenure in order to give the gov- playthiing when comnpared to her
ernor sufficient time in which to 1917 predecessor.
familiarize himself with problems of The first crusade saw a drastic
state administration and to carry out curtailment of privileges for both
a program of constructive public men and women students in the
service without weighing his decisions University. According to a World
in terms of political expediency for War I issue of the "Daily," women's
re-election." houses were required to close at 10
Other suggestions made by Dr. o'clock with a 10:30 extension on
Perkins were: the provision of an week-end nights. Gala sorority and
"adequate" salary for legislators; the dormitory affairs were granted 11
establishment of annual sessions; the o'clock permission.
! adoption of procedures to distribute In order to compensate for their
legislative activity throughout the curtailed social lives, coeds of the
session and eliminate some of the last generation were allowed to join
nfusion immediately preceding ad- the "Battalion of Death," a unit of-
journment; the creation of a fact fering them one hour per week in-
finding body along the lines of a struction in military drill. The Bat-
legislative council. talion went over the top only for
Reduced Numbers Sought men's ROTC parades.
"Finally, the late Governor Fitz- Women were also active in other
gerald's proposal that the Senate phases of the war effort. A Novem-
Sshould be reduced from 32 to 16
ber, 1917, Daily carried a fervent:

Choral Union's
Ninth Concert
To StarSzigeti
World Famous Virtuoso
Has Liking For Swing;
Admired By Goodman
Probably the only great violinist
who likes swing. Joseph Szigeti, will
be starred in a Choral Union concert
at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Hill Audi-
torium.
Szigeti, world-wide known as a vio-
lin virtuoso, is a swing music admirer.
In 1939 at Carnegie Hall before an
audience of half jitterbugs and half
musical die-hards Szigeti and Benny
Goodman played Bartok's Rhapsody
for Violin and Clarinet. Goodman
has always maintained that "Szigeti
is my musical idol."
The concert artist believes that
popular swing has made a great con-
tribution to music. He claims that
it has raised the standards of effici-
ency in playing music.
Thursday Szigeti will present Con-
certo in D minor by Tartini; Rondo
in D major by Schubert-Friedberg;
Sonata in'A major by Franck; Slav-
ohic Dance in G minor by Dvorak-
Kreisler; Study in Thirds by Scria-
bin-Szigeti; Snow by Lie-Szigeti; In-
termezzo from "Hary Janos" suite by
Kodaly-Szigeti; Maidens in the Gar-
den by Mompou-Szigeti; and Russian
Dance by Stravinsky-Dushkin.

Prima-ballerina Janina Frost and director Felix Sadowski will
head the Polish Ballet's program of classics and folk dances tomorrow
in Hill Auditoriui. Their appearances in Ann Arbor follows a highly
successful transcontinental tour.
Polithballet To Appear Here
tomorrow Ini Hill Auditorium

members and tne House from 140 to
50 members seems worthy," he said.
Admitting "there is real question
whether any modernization of the
constitution would be wrought by a!
constitutional convention, Dr. Per-
kins called for "able and forceful
leadership" to make constitutional
change acceptable to the people of
Michigan.
Summer Study Planned
To meet demands of army officials
for speeded up training and more
short terminal courses, the Commis-
sion on Junior College Terminal Edu-
cationhas decided to provide three
summer workshops for college in-
structors interested in setting up
terminal courses and -studying prob-
lems of terminal education.

coed's letter blasting the "unpatri-
otic waste" in the Union's eight-
course Thanksgiving dinner menu.
No similar protest has yet been reg-
istered in this war.
A further sacrifice came about
with the Hooverization of local
menus. Meatless, wheatless days
found liran muffins and fish on Uni-
versity dinner tables.
More serious in its implications
was the removal from the faculty of
an associate professor of German by
the Board of Regents.

The great music and dances of a
Europe-that-was will be presented
at 8:15 p.m. tomorrow in Hill Audi-
torium by the Polish Ballet in its
Ann Arbor appearances under the
sponsorship of the University Polo-
nia Society.
Under the direction of Felix Sa-
dowski, former ballet master of War-
saw Grand Opera, the company was
originally organized after Poland's
official ballet troupe had been
stranded at the New York World's
Fair with the outbreak of war.
The Hill Auditorium audience will
see a program combining Polish folk
dances with the works of Polish mas-
ter composers. First presentation
will be Chopiniana, featuring music
by Chopin and choreography by Sa-
dowski. Prelude, Polonnaise Mili-
taire, Nocturne, Mazurka No. 42 Op.
67, Mazurka No. 31, Op. 50, and Ma-
zurka No. 2 Op. 33 will be offered.
A guest artist, leading baritone
Milo Luka of the Prague National
Opera and now of the Chicago Civic
Opera Company, will be heard in
the second portion of the program.
"Country Wedding," third perform-
ance and a one-act ballet with Sa-
dowski in the lead role, will weave
ty pical national dances into a pea-
sant festival setting.
Following intermission, the Ballet
will offer "Gypsy Camp," a Brahms
work based on the carefree existence
of Hungary's nomads. Baritone Luka
will be presented again after this
performance.
A light tale of the Carpathian
mountain folk, "Tatra Mountaineer,"
will be performed with Paris-trained
Nina Juszkiewicz in a prominent role.
Umarl Maciek, Umark (Matthew
Died, He Died) has been selected as
the Ballet's finale. With a famous
Polish folk tale as its theme, this
character ballet is one of the most
stirring presentations on the pro-
gram.
Golf Trophy Is Received
By District Alumni Clubs
Michigan's Alumni Clubs of the
Ninth District, Eastern Michigan,
have received a new golf trophy from
James M. (Pat) O'Dea, of Detroit.
The first trophy which O'Dea pre-
sented in 1929 has now been filled
and is the permanent property of
the University of Michigan Alumni
Club of Ann Arbor.
Each year the trophy is awarded
to the foresome which wins a golf
match held at the time of the Ninth
District annual meeting in May. The
1942 meeting will be held in Ply-
mouth, Mich.

In addition to its emergency origin,
the Ballet is also unique in its prima-
ballerina, American-born Janina
Frost.
Tickets are still available all dayt
today at Hill Auditorium, the Union,
the League and campus bookstores.

MONDAY ONLY

r
y

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(Men born on or after Feb. 17, 1897 and on or before Dec. 31, 1921)
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