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April 19, 1942 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AlW ICI XG . ?AJILYa

Nine

Defeated By

Hoyas; Irish

Vanquish Netters

I

_. A

Sen ors

Georgetown'~s
Rally InEighth
Nets_7-5 Win
Victors Score Four Runs
In Late Splurge; Boim
Issues 11 Free Passes'
(Continued from Page 1)
the Wolverines had trouble gearing
their swings to the portly character's
whip. After Harms had walked in
the third frame and Boim struck out,
Davie Nelson blasted a hit into left
center which the Hoya fielder mis-
judged slightly. The ball rolled far
away and Davie churned all the way
around for a home run without too
much difficulty.
In the sixth large Mr. Dieckelman
lost his stuff while Michigan pounded
home three .more runs. Nelson and
Holman singled into left. Don Rob-
inson, fairly well recovered from his
ankle injury, struck out. Then Bud
Chamberlain singled, filling the bas-
es. Wayne Christenson connected
solidly driving the ball far into cen-
ter field. He circled the bases after
his three mates, but was called out
for failing to touch third. The hit
went for a double.
That ended the Michigan scoring.
Dieckelman, whom the Wolverines
had treated rudely last year by
knocking him out, maintained pretty
good control of things behind flaw-
less fielding the rest of the route, only
one Michigan man reaching second
and one third in the other seven in-
nings. The Wolverines went out in
order in the ninth although it took
two marvelous outfield catches to
stop them from threatening.
The Wild Way

,.

ANF

ISPORTFOLIO
" Jupiter Pluvius Refrains-
i Dixie College Life
By HAL WILSON
Daily Sports Editor

MICHIGAN AB
Nelson, cf .............. 3
Holman, lf............. 4
Robinson, ss ...........4
Chamberlain, 3b ..... 4
Christenson, 3b .........4
Cartmill, rf ............ 4
Boor, lb .............. 4
Harms, c ..... . ........2
Boim, p ..... . ..3
Savage, p ........... ... 0
Erpelding*......... ...1
Totals ............ 33

H
2
1
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
8

O
4
2
1
2
5
0
7
3
0
0
0
24

A
1
0
5
1
2
0
0
3
2
0
0
14

WASHINGTON, D.C., April 18.-
Today's game with Georgetown
on the Hoyas' high plateau diamond
under cloudless skies makes the sec-
ond straight Southern trip that
Michigan's rambling Wolverines have
completed with perfect weather. Last
spring the club eased through an
eight-game Dixie slate without being
washed out.
Sophomore Bill Cain, the bespec-
tacled right-hander who fashioned
Michigan's five-hit win over Mary-
land without allowing a walk, stands
ready to drag down $9 for the per-
formance-unless his dad reneges.
Mr. Cain came down to College Park
from Forest Hills, N. Y., in order to
see his son work the game and of-
fered Bill a dollar for every strikeout,
whereupon young William promptly
set down nine Terrapins via the fan-
ning route.
West Virginia's baseball team is
also making a swing around the
Washington area this week and
stopped at Maryland for a game
following Michigan's. Wolverine
mentor Ray Fisher and Coach Rog-
ers of the Mountaineers sat around
in an informal bull session for a
couple hours. Both have piloted
college teams for 21 years. One of
the less pertinent facts which came
to light is that Rogers, a two-time
AI-American football player for
West Virginia, never went to high
school.
MOST of the nation's sports pages
carried the somewhat startling
story to the effect that some 55,000
paid attendance was registered for
Jersey City's International League
opener the other day, which is better
than any major loop team drew.
Far more interesting than the cold
statistics, however, is the fact that
the Jersey City park holds only 24,500
people. The discrepancy stems di-
rectly back to Mayor Hague, Jersey
City's pseudo-dictator. Some time
ago he interested theNew York Gi-
ants in sponsoring an International
League ball club in his city-but had
to promise an annual opening day
capacity attendance to persuade
I them. And that's the simplest part
of the entire deal for Hague, who
simply warns his city employes that
they all must take a warm interest in
baseball that one day of the year or
perhaps they won't be city employes.
Obvious net result: they all buy open-
U.S. Unable To Coupete
In Pan-American Games
CHICAGO. April 18. -(P)- The
war today cancelled U.S. participa-
tion in the first Pan-American Games
at Buenos Aires, Argentina's big
1942 sports show arranged to take
the place of the suspended Olympics.
The decision to withdraw the U.S.
team, reached "with great reluctance"
after consultation with Federal au-
thorities. was announced by Avery
Brundage, chairman of the U.S. Pan-
American Games committee.
This country joined Canada in
withdrawing its team. Virtually all
the South Amei'ican republics have
signified intention to compete.

ing day
payroll.

The Wolverine ball club read I
with considerable surprise and
pleasure at the breakfast table this
morning of the double defeat
handed Iowa and Illinois, strongest
contenders for Michigan's Big Ten
diamond crown on Friday. That
leaves the race wide open.
IF George Washington never slept in
Charlottesville, Va., during Easter
Week, it's only because he didn't
know about it. One Southern Virginia
gentleman complained "That it isn't
like the old days though. Why I can
remember," he declared bitterly,
"when they used to post a bugler on
the edge of the campus overlooking
town proper. And whenever a stu-
dent started down the grade, the
bugler would blow a warning to the
townspeople who immediately rushed
out and formed civilian defense units.
But now a person doesn't have the
freedom he used to. Thomas Jeffer-
son never meant it to be like this."
The incident which motivated the
speaker to give out on this tirade was
a recent administrative motion to
the effect that all fraternities must
keep their liquor supply in the houses.
Formerly they had elaborate lawn
parties. Nor is this any exaggeration.
One-armed bandits are common in
the fraternities-they take and spit
real coins.
Georgetown is coached by Joe
Judge, former Washington Senator
first baseman. The Hoyas play
freshmen, and possess some good
ones at that. Six of the 14 squad-
men are newcomers. Such names
as Gyorgydeak, Mylnarski, Kuli-
kowski and Dieckelman dot the
Hoya roster. An outfielder named
John Smith also sneaked into
school. William Hassett, George-
town freshman infielder, is a broth-
er of Major Leaguer Buddy Has-
sett. Clark Griffith, Washington
Senator owner, attended the game.

tickets and remain on the

Varsity Loses
Hard Struggle
By 6-3 Score
Canale Conquers Hammett
In Day's Featured Tilt;
Porter Defeats Parks
(Continued from Page 1)
at 3-4, add in, but missed a baseline
shot by inches. Faught broke through
on the next two points and then
went on to win the set and match, 6-3.
Johnson Wins Agains
The fourth and sixth singles bat-
tIles were taken in straight set by
Notre Dame and Michigan, respec-
tively. Although the scores were
quite decisive, almost every game
went to deuce three or four times
before somebody could win out. Mich-
igan's Gerry Schaflander went down
before the racquet-wielding of Bud
Ford, 6-2, 6-1, in the fourth singles
spot, while "Jinx" Johnson tripped
Notre Dame's Artie Hoffman, 6-0. 6-3.
Tom Gamon fought like a tiger,
but just couldn't quite match George
Biittner in the fifth division. Tom
dropped the first set, 6-2, and was
behind 4-0 before he got his strokes
working. He brought the score to
4-all, and then got the lead for the
first time, only to have his opponent
tie it up again. Again Tom turned
on the heat and won the set 7-5. But
after the Michigan senior took the
first three games of the next set,
Biitner became the master of the
situation and ran off six games in a
row to win, 6-3.
Win Third Doubles
All the doubles matches were bit-
terly fought struggles. Stille and
Schaflander, playing in the top spot,
lost the opening set, 6-1, but after
being down match point, 3-5, the
Wolverine netters dug in and pulled
it out of the fire, 7-5. In the last
set, they were down again, 3-5,
match point, and again they came
through to make the score 4-5. It
all went to naught, however, for!
Faught held his service and the Irish
put the battle away in the victory
bag, 6-4.
Porter and Hammett dropped a
tough three set match to Parks and
Ford in second doubles, 1-6, 6-4, 6-2,
while Gamon and Johnson picked
up the Wolverines' lone point in
doubles as they defeated Hoffman
and Fred Doutel in the final match
of the afternoon, 6-4. 6-4.

TORONTO, April 18.-UP)-Tor-
onto scored three times in the final
period to defeat Detroit, 3 to 1, to-
night and gain the Stanley Cup,
emblematic of world hockey suprem-
acy.
Sweeney Schriner got two of the
goals that enabled the Maple Leafs
to become the first team in Nationall
League history to win the cup after'
losing the first three games of the
best-of-seven playoffs.
A capacity crowd of 16,218 watched
the Leafs regain possession of the
trophy they last won in 1932.
Schriner and Syl Apps had perfect
scoring chances as the game opened
when they moved in on Mowers but
the Detroit goalie made great saves.
Schriner was chased for cross check
ing in the eleventh minute but the
Leafs checked the Wings to a stand-
still until he returned.
The Wings forced much of the
play in the early exchanges and on
one occasion the Toronto goalie lost
his stick but blocked a blow shot by
Grosso with his gloves.
With less than two minutes to go,
the Wings suffered two quick pen-
alties, McCraig and Orlando going
off for tripping. They finished the
period two short but held the Leafs
scoreless.
The Wings were still two men short
when the second period opened but
with all players available the Leafs
were trapped down the ice and the
Wings broke away, three abreast, to
open the scoring. Howe fired a back-
hand shot from the right side of the
Toronto net that beat, Broda. He
In The Majors
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Detroit 4, St. Louis 0
Cleveland 1, Chicago 0
Washington 10, Philadelphia 6
Boston 5, New York 1
NATIONAL LEAGUE
New York 8, Boston 5
Philadelphia 2, Brooklyn 1
Pittsburgh 3, St. Louis 0
Cincinnati at Chicago-post-
poned because of cold weather

Toronto !Viakes Hockey itory,
Wins_3-i In Last Period Surge

took a direct pass from Orlando. Abel
started the play.
The Leafs ganged as Wings took
four penalties to two for the Toronto
team but they kept their net clearn
When Orlando was sent off for
holding, Toronto countered by send-
ing on four wings and just as the
Detroiter stepped back on the rink
the Leafs tied the score on a tally by
Schriner.
Two minutes later the home team
went out in front on Langelle's shot
and as the end neared Schriner con-
nected for the third Leaf tally of the
period.
H ELP!
Bring My Watch Back!
Spare piy explaining to my folks.
Finder assured generous reward.
It's a Hamilton lady's watch,
square, white gold, 6 diamonds.
Lost on Lincoln, Forest or Hill.
Return watch to Brown ,Jug.
DELICIOUS!
That's the only word that we can
think of to describe the way in
which we prepare all your favorite
dishes. It's real home-cooking! You
will be delighted at the quiet, at-
tractive surroundings. Main dining
room up the stairs in the UNIVER-
SITY GRILL.
Just Redecorated
University Grill
.6 15 1Fast William

Van Boven
offers a
complete
CAP and
GOWN
SERVICE.

and

Graduate
Students

IyI

I]

0

Place

*Erpelding; for Savage in ninth.

U

i

I

GEORGETOWN AB H
Smith, rf .............4 0
Mylnarski, ss .......... 4 1
Kulikowski, 3b ........4 1
Hines, cf .............. 4 0
Dieckelman, p .....,.... 3 2
Gyorgydeak, 2b .........2 0
Bulvin, if.............2 1
Costello, c............. 2 0
Murphy, lb............1 0

0
3
0
2
1
0
2
2
7
10

A
0
31
3
0
1
21
0
1
0

Totals ............ 26 5 27 10
MICHIGAN ... 002 003 000-5 8 2
GEORGETOWN 020 010 04x-7 5 0
Runs: Smith, Mylnarski, Kuliko -
ski, Dieckelman 2, Bulvins, Murphy,
Nelson 2, Harms, Holman, Cham-
berlain. Errors: Harms, Chamber-
lain. Runs batted in: Nelson 2,
Christenson 3. Two base hits: Kuli-
kowski, Christenson. Home run: Nel-
son. Stolen base: Nelson. Sacrifices:
Murphy. Double plays: Nelson to
Christenson, Kulikowski to Gyorgy-
deak to Murphy. Left on bases:
Michigan 4, Georgetown 9. Bases
on balls: off Biom 3, Dieckelman 8.
Hits: off Boim 5 in 7 1-3 innings,
Savage 0 in 2-3. Hit by pitcher: by
Boim (Gyorgydeak). Wild pitches:
Boim 2. Losing pitcher: Boim. Um-
pire, Joseph Nilats.

"-I
SUNDAY SUPPER
Served in the Main Dining Room--6:00 until 7:30 o'clock
Grilled Veal Chop, Spiced Pear Golden Brown Waffle, Syrup
Potatoes au Gratin Grilled Bacon
Glaced Baby Carrots Lemon Meringue Pie
Peppermint Candy Ice Cream or Orange Sherbet
or Walnut Laver CakeoROan r e

Michigan Golfers L.ose, Ii -6 1,/
To Kentucky In Opening Match
(Spcial to The Daily) consistently good golf lately, tied his;
LEXINGTON, Ky., April 18.-In- opponent, Carlisle Myers, to give eachj
augurating their 1942 season, the team 1/ points. In the final indi-
Wolverine golfers absorbed a 11!?2 to
6% beating at the hands of the Uni- vidual match Meade Ferris scored 24
versity of Kentucky today. points for Kentucky by beating Dave
Playing at the AshlandgCountry Osler who garnered ; point for the
Club just outside of Lexington, both Wolverines.
teams were somewhat hampered by Michigan Loses Best Ball
high winds which made wod shots In the best ball matches the south-
difficult. Blazing Ben Smith paced ern gentlemen took Michigan to the
Michigan by carding the lowest score tune of 4 to 2. Smith and Fife teamed
of the match, a 75. In individual up against Ramsey and Allen in the
play, Smith was the only varsity number one slot, while Simonds and
member to win his match by beating Osler played against Ferris and,
Lloyd Ramsey of Kentucky. 2' to 1/2 Myer~s.
Ramsey, who is Kentucky state The match was even less decisive
amateur champ, tied Chan Simonds than thescore indicated, for three
of Michgan and Ermal Allen of rounds were decided on the last green.
Kentucky for runner-up individual From Lexington the squad travels
scoring honors by shooting a 76.- to Columbus, Ohio, where they play
Fife Off Form the Buckeyes on Monday. Meeting
In the number two spot, varsity Ohio State in an eight man match
linksman Bob Fife shot a mediocre the Wolverines will have the services
82 which didn't even come close to of Capt. John Leidy, Fred Brewer,
Allen's 76., Score: Allen 3, Fife 0. Phil Marcellus, Bill Stewart, and
Simonds, who has been shooting Bill Ludolph.
Kiefer Sets Mark In DAC Meet
(Special to The Daily)
DETROIT, April 18.-Adolf Kiefer of Chicago added another record to
his collection in the DAC Invitational Exhibition Meet here tonight, clipping
two full seconds off his own world mark in the 100 meter backstroke by
swimming the distance in 1:02.8.
Eclipsing the standard he established in the same pool six years ago,
Kiefer beat Harry Holiday, Michigan's freshman star, by more than a full
second. Holiday, however, also cracked the former world record, his time
being 1:03.9.
In a special match 100 yard freestyle race, Wolverine Jack Patten and
Bill Prew finished in a dead heat at 52 seconds. Just two weeks ago Prew
tied the world mark of 51 seconds, but tonight he was unable to approach
that clocking. Otto Jaretz of Chicago was third.
Walt Tomski, former Michigan great, proved tonight that he still could
speed through the water, winning the 50 yard freestyle in 23.1. Wolverine
Gus Sharemet was-second, the watches clicking at 23.2 for him while Dobby
Burton finished third, a full second behind Sharemet.
Sunday at the Wolverine
209 SOUTH STATE
Cream of Mushroom Soup . . . or . .. juice
Celery Pickles Olives
ROAST CHICKEN, Dressing, Cranberry Sauce
or GRILLED STEAK, Chili Sauce
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WAR COMMENTATOR for the Detroit News
Speaking on

t4'eaefttift.. .
Mr. S. L. A. MARSHALL

~Our ('lace hathe WNIP Toddy~i

and

P)

Rackham Auditorium 8:15 P.M. Tues., April 21
Proceeds to Women's Field Army for Control of Cancer
Tickets 50c (tax included)
On Sale at
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