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April 15, 1942 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1942-04-15

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0:

TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1913

TWO WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1942

Interfraternity
Campus Sing'
Will Be May 4
Final Contest Will Be Held
On Main Library Steps;
Cups To Be Presented
Fraternities are urged to get their
pianos tuned and their voices in
shape, because the seventh annual
Interfraternity Sing is scheduled for
Monday, May 4.
This year as before, finals will be
held on the steps of the main library.
Three cups will be awarded plus a
rotating cup which the winner also
receives.
Eliminations will be held Thurs-
day, April 30, in the Union. James
Weinstein, '44, in charge of publicity,
pointed out that houses must re-
member to keep the volume of their
voices down because the room at the
Union is small. Last year several
fraternities ran into difficulty as
they sang too loudly for the size of
the room.
Contestants are not held down to
singing only fraternity songs. "Out-
side" songs are equally acceptable;
Last year's winner, Kappa Sigma,
received the first place award sing-
ing "All Through the Night."
Each fraternity entered will have a
sorority backer to cheer them on with
planned and spontaneous noises.
Details of the contest, such as the
exact time, and the naming of the
person to present the awards have
not been announced, but participants
and spectators of last year's Sing will
doubtlessly recall that Miss Lynn
Kendall, blonde actress in "The Sky-
lark," added a touch to the occasion.
Phi kappa Phi
Books Hayden
Political Scientist To Talk
At BanquetApril 23
Prof. Joseph R. Hayden, chairman
of the Department of Political Sci-
ence, will return from Washington to
be the speaker at the Phi Kappa
Phi initiation dinner, to be held
Thursday, April 23, in the Michigan
League Ballroom.
He has chosen "Portents of the
East" as his discussion topic.
At present in the office of the
Coordinator of Information in Wash-
ington, Professor Hayden is on leave
for the year 1941-42 from the Uni-
versity. On previous leaves from the
University he taught as an exchange
professor in the Philippine Islands,
in 1922-23, and as a Carnegie visit-
ing professor in 1930-31, During
these periods in the Islands he was
a special correspondent for the Chris-
tian Science Monitor, as well as in
1926.
From 1933 to 1935 he held the office
of vice-governor of the Philippine
Islands. Drawing on his extensive
knowledge of the Philippines and
of the Far East, Professor Hayden
has written a number of books and
articles on the Islands. His latest,
published this year, is "The Philip-
pines: A Study in National Develop-
ment."
After the dinner, the ballroom will
be opened to the general public for
Professor Hayden's speech.
Coast Guard On Alert
ST. LOUIS, April 14.-(P)-The
United States Coast Guard isn't tak-
ing any chances, even with a Negro
sharecropper's story of seeing an Axis
submarine in the Mississippi River

near Cairo, Ill. The Negro, living in
southeast Missouri, said he boarded
the craft and talked to the crew. Two
Coast Guard cutters were sent to
investigate. Then the sharecropper
admitted the story was untrue.
MICHIGAN
Ending Today!
A GLAMOUR-DISH IS ON
THE BLITZ FOR GARYI
*A/If6

Honor Work

Flew' Fortress' From JavaI

Applcations
May Be Filed
Students intending to enroll in the
University Honors Program will be
able to file applications and gain fur-
ther information on the program
every Monday, Wednesday and Fri-
day from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in
Room 1204 Angell Hall until the May
1 deadline.
Sophomores with a B average are
eligible for this course of study which
was inaugurated four years ago by
the University as a major education-
al experiment. Covering the fields of
science, social science and literature,
the program will admit approximate-
ly 40 students.
Tutor Board
Honors work, which involves five
credit hours per semester and re-
places the traditional concentration
program, is given under an eight-man
board of tutors headed by Dr. John
Arthos of the English department.
Five groups now offered to juniors
will be carried over into next year
for the same students.
Illustrative of Honors Program is'
the group studying "The Transition
from Feudal Individualism to Capi-
talism and the Trend Toward Col-
lectivism." Prof. H. B. Calderwood
of the political science department
is tutor for this group.
Three students under Professor
Calderwood have been following a
year's study of the ideas and insti-
tutions which have formed the basis
of society's organization since the
period of feudalism. Religious, poli-
tical, social and economical aspects
of this subject are taken up in read-
ings and weekly discussions.
Thinking Analyzed
This particular group covers nearly
half a millenium as it analyzes the'
trends in society's thinking up to the
present day. According to Profes-
sor Calderwood the group is given,
work which is not handled by any
University department in a specific
course.
In addition to its one-year length,
an honors group also differs from
the regulation University course in
the nature of its examinations. Pro-
fessor Calderwood, for example, has
given one written final examination
and probably will employ an oral one
at the end of this semester.
One of the main purposes of the
Honors Program is to lessen the dan-
ger of ultra-practical education that
would deter training individuals
skilled in thinking along with their
highly-specific proficiencies.
This follows from America's pres-
ent predicament which has been
caused, according to some quarters,
more by a lack of will-power and
foresight than by a deficiency in
technical skills.
NIROTC To Begn
PhysicalProgram
Coincident with the announcement
that a physical fitness program will
be inaugurated before the end of the
semester, the Naval ROTC an-
nounced yesterday that changes in
its schedule will make possible a
summer training cruise.
The physical fitness program will
be coordinated with regular drill pe-
riods for the rest of the semester,
Lieut. K. S. Shook, Executive Officer
of the unit, declared. The program
will be under the supervision of R. B.
Branham, Chief Specialist for Physi-
cal Education, Naval Reserve, who
came to the unit this week from the
Physical Instructors' School at Nor-
folk, Va.
The summer training cruise will
be held from May 28 to June 10 and
will be voluntary for the entire unit.
A recent survey of NROTC cadets
revealed that over 90 would make the
cruise if it were offered.

BOMBER
SCHOLARSHIPS
The following is a list of all organ-
izations that have contributed funds,
pledged funds or promised support to
the Bomber-Scholarship Fund.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

I

Master Sergeant Harry M. Hayes
(above) of San Antonio, Tex.,, and
Capt.. Gerald Cherrmisin of Alta-
loma, Calif., had never taken up a
Flying Fortress before, but they
patched one up from parts of three
damaged ones, and with child refu..
gees stowed in the bomb bay made
a flight from Bandoeng, Java, to
Australia.
Four'To Attend
SpeeehParley
University Staff Members
Depart For Convention
Representing the Department of
Speech, four members of the staff
will participate in the program of
the convention of the Central States
Speech Association which will be held
April 16, 17 and 18 at Des Moines,
Iowa.
The four who will attend this con-
vention are Prof. Kenneth G. Hance,
Donald Hargis, assistant in speech,
Dr. Glen E. Mills and Dr. Arthur
Secord.
Dr. Mills will speak before two
sessions. In the first he will discuss
"Recent Michigan Studies in Rhet-
oric and Oratory" and in the second
on "The Role of Discussion in the
Civilian Defense Program.
Dr. Secord will also participate in
two sessions: Integration of Speech
and the Natural Sciences, and Re-
ports of State Organizations. In the
former he will speak on "Research
and Advances in Biology of Impor-
tance to the Student and Teacher of
Speech." As president of the Michi-
gan Association of Teachers of
Speech, he will speak in the latter
session on "The Speech Education
Program in Michigan."
Donald Hargis will take part in
sessions on Discussion and on Con-
temporary Practice in Public Ad-
dress. In the first he will discuss
"An Extra-Curricular Discussion Pro-
gram" and in the second on "Con-
temporary Practice in Radio Speak-
ing."

Organizations Prom*
Abe Lincoln Co-op. $
Adelia Cheever .....
Allen-Rumsey Dorm.
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Alpha Gamma Delta
Alpha Phi
Alpha Sigma Phi
Alpha Xi Delta
Architectural So-
ciety ............
Chicago House .....
Chi Omega
Collegiate Sorosis
Congress Co-op
Delta Delta Delta
Delta Gamma
Fletcher Hall .......
Graduate Council,.
Greene House.....
Hillel Foundation
Japanese-American
Student Club .,...
Jordan Hall
Kappa Delta
Kappa Kappa
Gamma ..........50.00
Karl Marx Society
Lloyd House.......
Martha Cook Dorm..200.00
Michigan Co-op
Michigan Union ....
Mosher Hall Coun-
cil ..............
Muriel Lester Co-op
Phi Delta Phi ......
Phi Epsilon Phi
Phi Gamma Delta
Pi Lambda Phi .....
Robert Owen Co-op
Rochdale Co-op
Scabbard & Blade.~
Sigma Alpha Epsilon
Sigma Phi
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Slosson, Preston ....
Sphinx
Student League of
America
Theta Delta Chi
West Quad Council . .
Wyvern
Zeta Beta Tau ..... 50.00
J-Hop Committee
Soph Prom Com-
mittee ..........
Michigan Alumnae
Club ............
Senior Supper ......
Lloyd House Honor
Students .........

Con**
$ 12.87
10.00
50.00
10.00
3.83
10.00
5.00
15.00

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15, 1942 c
VOL. LII. No. 145f
Publication in the Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University.
Notices'
Student Tea: President and Mrs.
Ruthven will be at home to students1
this afternoon from 4 to 6 o'clock.
Note to Seniors, May Graduates,
and Graduate Students: Please file
application for degrees or any special
certificates (i.e. Geology Certificate,
Journalism Certificate, etc.) at once
if you expect to receive a degree or
certificate at Commencement on May
30, 1942. We cannot guarantee that
the University will tonfer a degree
or certificate at Commencement up-
on any student who fails to file such
application before the close of busi-
ness on Thursday, April 30. If ap-
plication is received later than April
30, your degree or certificate may not
be awarded until next fall.
Candidates for degrees or certifi-
cates may fill out cards at once at
the office of the secretary or record-
er of their own school or college (stu-
dents enrolled in the College of Lit-
erature, Science, and the Arts, School
of Music, School of Education, and
School of Public Health, please note
that application blanks may be ob-
tained and filed in the Registrar's
Office, Room 4, University Hall).
Please do not delay until the last
day, as more than 2500 diplomas and
certificates must be lettered, signed,
and sealed and we shall be greatly
helped in this work by the early fil-
ing of applications and the resulting
longer period for preparation.
The filing of these applications

does not involve the payment of any
fee whatsoever.
Shirley W. Smith
Staff Travel by Automobile: As a
measure of economy it is requested
that faculty and staff members who
have occasion to travel on Univer-
sity business by personally owned or
University owned automobile report

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

their plans in advance to the office
of Dr. Frank E. Robbins, Assistant to
the President (Campus telephone
328), in order that when feasible,
persons going 'to the same place at
the same time may ride in the same
car and save both tires and expense.
A record of such plans will be kept
in the President's Office, and those
(Continued on Page 4)

4.50

WANT ED TO BUY
WANTED-Bike. Will pay well for a
good bike. Call Sid, 2-1682, be-
tween 7-8 p.m. 319c
CASH for used clothing; men and
ladies. Claude H. Brown, 512 S.
Main St. Phone 2-2736. 5c
CLOTHES BOUGHT AND SOLD-
Ben the Tailor, 122 East Washing-
ton. Phone after 6 o'clock, 5387.
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER desired
-Good condition; reasonable price.
Marjorie Taylor, 1503 Washtenaw,
2-3159. 311c
MEN'S AND LADIES' CLOTHING,
suits, overcoats, typewriters, musi-
cal instruments, ladies' furs, Per-
sian lamb, mink, watches, dia-
monds, Pay from $5 to $500. Phone
Sam, 5300. 229c
MISCELLANEOUS
MIMEOGRAPHING - Thesis bind-
ing. Brumfield and Brumfield, 308
S. State. 6c

10.00
1,000.00
25.00
113.00
18.75
25.00
10.00
50.00
1,950.00
85.00
50.00
2.41

LOST and FOUND
LOST-Black Wahl Eversharp pen.
Initials L. W. H. Reward. Call
Larry Hayes. 2-4401. 319c
LOST-Wardflex camera in brown
case Sunday night on S. University.
Call Betty, 4759. Reward. 313c
LOST-White gold Bulova watch and
band between Main Library and
Liberty. Call 2-3241. Reward.
3118c
GILT LEATHER EVENING BAG
containing wrist watch and glasses.
Saturday night, vicinity of League.
Reward. 7392. 314c
LAUNDERING
LAUNDRY - 2-1044. Sox darned.
Careful work at low price. 2c
STUDENTS' BUNDLES WANTED-
6c per lb., rough dry. Shirts extra
10ceach. Handkerchiefs, 1ce eah.
Phone 25-8441. 295c
TYPING
L. M. HEYWOOD, experienced typist,
414 Maynard Street, phone 5689.
MISS ALLEN-Experienced typist.
408 S.^Fifth Ave. Phone 2-2935.
HELP WANTED
GERMAN TRANSLATOR WANTED
-Call 3590 and ask for Bill. 308c

i

25.00

I

ASCE Will Hear Alt
Tell Of Raid Protection

Group To Send
Two Engineers
To Anntual Met
The student chapter of the Ameri-
can Society of Civil Engineers will
send two official delegates and sev-
eral other members to tche, annual
midwestern conference of ASCE
groups which will be held in Cleve-
land tomorrow and Friday.
The conference, which brings to-
gether representatives of student
ASCE groups from 12 midwestern
schools, will be centered around the
theme of National defense and the
duty of civil engineers in the emerg-
ency. Discussion groups and lectures
by prominent practicing engineers
will also be held.
Jim Howard, '43E. and John Au-
feroth, '43E, are being sent as the
representatives of the Ann Arbor
student ASCE organization, but Fred
Elmiger, '42E, Hank Sterngold, '44E,
Campbell Fisher, '43E, Paul Erick-
son, '43E Walter Williams, '43E, San-
for Stone, '43E, and Robert Brewer,
'43E, have also indicated their in-
tentions to attend.
Although no means of organized
group transportation has been ar-
ranged and expenses of attending
members except for the official dele-
gates will not be paid by the group,
bus and train ratcs and connections
havc been investigated and travel
information can be secured, by mem-
bers, from ASCE offwiers. Ann Arbor
delegates and urnof icia I members
plan to meet in Cleveland shortly be-
fore the registration deadline at 1
p.m. on Thursday, and to attend
meetings together.
-- --

Totals..........$300.00 $3,485.36
*Promises of contributions
* Actual contributions.
Drive For Donors
Far Short Of Goal
With only 52 donors registered at
the close of the second day of the
campus-wide Red Cross blood drive,
Union officials conducting the drive
were far short of their goal of 1,000
registrants.
Seeking to build up a large reserve
list for future donations, registration
of donors will continue from 2 to 5:301
p.m. every day through Friday, in the
lobby of the Union.
Group registration of fraternities,
sorori ties, dormitories and coopera-
tives is especially urged by drive
officials. More than 2,000 persons
indicated, in the defense survey taken
earlier in the year, that they would
be willing to donate blood, and these
persons are asked now to register,
for the reserve list.
Not all students registering this
week will be called upon to give
blood when the actual donations are
taken for the present drive from 1 to
5 p.m. Friday at the Women's Ath-
letic Building. Those who are not
called upon in this drive will be
placed upon the standing reserve list
of donors.
BONUS NIGHT Thursday
for holders of Art Cinema
League series tickets.
1 C%
Ali*s NAKIWirt
Also

Emergency
Fund Offers
Aid To Grad
(Editor's Note: This is the fourth in
a series of articles on the benefits of
the Emergency Fund for Foreign Stu-
dents. The International Ball, which
will be held Friday in the Union Ball-
room, will donate all of its proceeds to
the Fund.)
The Emergency Fund for foreign
students never stops benefiting Uni-
versity students-even after they've
graduated.
Recently one University student
completed his studies here and left
the city for his homeland. His de-
parture occurred around the time of
the Pacific crisis before Pearl Har-
bor. Shortly after the Japanese at-
tack on the Hawaiian Islands word
was received by the International
Center that the student was strand-
ed on the West Coast.
His ship had been torpedoed and
he had lost all of his baggage, in-
cluding his instruments and library,
and he was about to be placed in cus-
tody as an alien without status in
this country. The Center wired the
student that it would intercede with
the United States Immigration Serv-
ice. The Emergency Fund for For-
eign Students sent him sufficient
funds for his immediate needs.
Latest information is that his stat-
us has been legalized, and he has
been provided with a job until he
(,ll go home.
Colorful Exhibit Shown
Decorating fabrics together with
color schemes and arrangements
which were assembled by the Depart-
ment of Interior Design are being
currently displayed in the ground
floor show cases of the Architecture
Building.
- Last Times Today -
GENE TIERNEY
SHOWS DAILY at
1 --3---7--9 P.M.
STARTS THURSDAY
WHAT FUN!

d

I

Ak!that' A
~jBest Meal
in Tow-

....

1I

I

Good Food
is the pride of THE TAVERN.
Try it, you'll enjoy it.
37IY TAVERNA
338 MAYNARD

T
.
s
i/
rai :-,,.

II

*--

*

r3I
__1

WASHED SAND AND GRAVEL -
Driveway gravel, washed pebbles.
Killins Gravel Company, phone
7112. 7c
FOR SALE
BOOK SALE: 25th Anniversary. Bid-
dle's Bookstore, 11 Niichols Arcade.
309c

Members of the student chapter of
the American Society of Civil Engi-
neers will meet at 7:30 p.m. tomor-
row in the Union to hear Prof. Glenn
L. Alt, of the Civil Engineering de-
partment speak on the "Engineering
Aspects of Air Raid Protection."
Professor Alt, who recently at-
tended a national conference on air
raid protection in New York City will
describe methods which he learned
there,
Tax Evader Explains
DES MOINES, Ia., April 14.--P-
The Iowa Tax Commission received
this response to one of its notices
concerning overdue state income
taxes: "I can't do much for you
right now as I am tied up here for
a while; In fact, I won't be able to
do anything about it until after
1946."." The writer is an inmate of
the Fort Madison Penitentiary.
FORDHAM UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
NEW YORK
Case System
Three-Year Day Course

Colorful costumes -
international beauties
'I t

i 4ilk
These strong, purposeful men who are flyng our planes
in combt need the finest body fuel to insure freedom
from nervous strain and strength to cope with unex-
pected situations. For them MILK is a part of their
U IIIf

NIGHT MAIL
Comnilatary by

1)1.111 1:1.ADlE.N
Inter n~"itiooia I W.111 ADEON

S.AMM UA[9W[N ni5CNT5 ,s

I

I

" .s---- - " r^ .:. ~yam

11

i

II

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